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By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | August 12, 1992
Student school board member Jay Witcher fought back tears last week, speaking about the death of his Glen Burnie High School classmate, Nikki Preston."
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By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
Alexander Morris gently plated seasoned chicken pieces atop creamy risotto and garnish, while Tyler Weedon whisked a fish reduction, a brownish sauce. Nearby, Kara Lovalvo used a meat thermometer to measure the heat of a lobster tail, and Eric Orlean assembled the dessert - a banana chocolate Bavarian. Though preparing the gourmet items posed a challenge for the culinary-minded teenagers from Howard County, the kitchen conditions made Wednesday's statewide cooking contest for high-schoolers even more daunting: Teams had to make the meal in one hour using only two butane burners for heat.
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NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Donna Weaver and Kris Antonelli and Donna Weaver,Staff Writers | July 31, 1992
A 17-year-old Glen Burnie High School student died yesterday morning in a Brooklyn apartment after inhaling butane fumes from a can, Baltimore City police said.Nichelle Nicole Preston, of the 1800 block of Saunders Way in Harundale, was pronounced dead of cardiac arrest at Harbor Hospital Center shortly after 1 a.m., police and hospital officials said.The police report said that Miss Preston was spending the night at a friend's home in the 1100 block of Cambria St. when she inhaled the fumes.
NEWS
By Kristina Schurr and Kristina Schurr,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 8, 1997
County police arrested a Baltimore man on drug charges after finding him napping in his car on Ballman Court Sunday. Police said they found a brass pipe at his feet that contained residue of cocaine.Michael A. Oldaker, 32, of the 800 block of Pontiac Ave. was charged with possession and possession with intent to distribute cocaine and marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cocaine within 1,000 feet of Park Elementary School.Neighbors told police about 8: 30 a.m. that there was a suspicious car on their street.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | August 1, 1992
Nikki Preston would have been 17 Monday. Instead, the Glen Burnie girl, who died from inhaling butane gas in search of a high, will be buried Monday in Loudon Park Cemetery.Yesterday, her father, Burl, 49, pleaded for teen-agers to "break their code of silence" about sniffing butane gas and help each other."They call them friends but they let them die," he said, bursting into tears.Mr. Preston joined County Councilman Edward C. Middlebrooks, whose daughter, Jennifer, was a friend of Nikki's, in urging Anne Arundel County police to investigate the extent of butane abuse among area teen-agers.
NEWS
By Kristina Schurr and Kristina Schurr,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 8, 1997
County police arrested a Baltimore man on drug charges after finding him napping in his car on Ballman Court Sunday. Police said they found a brass pipe at his feet that contained residue of cocaine.Michael A. Oldaker, 32, of the 800 block of Pontiac Ave. was charged with possession and possession with intent to distribute cocaine and marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cocaine within 1,000 feet of Park Elementary School.Neighbors told police about 8: 30 a.m. that there was a suspicious car on their street.
NEWS
August 21, 1992
Nichelle Nicole Preston should be preparing for cheerleading practice at Glen Burnie High School. Instead, she is dead. She died a week shy of her 17th birthday, from inhaling butane fumes from a can. There are many senseless ways to die, but it is hard to imagine a greater waste than this.So far, the war on drugs has isolated the "sexy" drugs -- cocaine, heroin, marijuana -- as the enemy while ignoring cruder but equally dangerous substances like butane. That has been a mistake.Though deaths from inhalant abuse are rare, Ms. Preston's tragedy reflects what experts say is a growing trend toward abuse of cheap, easily obtained household items -- metallic spray paints, solvents, cleaning fluids, gasoline, even the "white-out" used for typewriter corrections.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer Staff writer Rafael Alvarez contributed to this article | August 1, 1992
Death by inhalant abuse is so rare in Maryland that the medical examiner's office throws it into the catch-all classification known as "other."But statistics from the state's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration indicate that the habit of sniffing butane, gasoline and other petroleum distillates has a small, but growing following.Inhalants were cited by 5.3 percent of all admissions in the state's drug and alcohol treatment programs in 1991, said the administration's director, Rick Sampson, up from 3.3 percent in 1990.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1995
Two teen-agers approached a Baltimore police officer patrolling the Eastern District last night, doused him with gasoline and unsuccessfully attempted to set him on fire, police said.Officer Erich Deiker, 30, who briefly chased his assailants before being overcome by the gasoline fumes, was taken to the Wilmer Eye Clinic at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he was examined and released, police said.Officer Deiker, who has been on the force for four years, was sitting in his patrol car in the 1500 block of Biddle St. about 6:15 p.m. with the window down when a male teen-ager on a red mountain bike rode by and squirted gasoline into the car, said Officer Sabrina V. Tapp-Harper, a police spokeswoman.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1996
Police arrested a Gambrills couple on drug charges yesterday and seized nearly $650, a police report said.The arrests took place after Officer Daniel Sereboff pulled over a car for speeding shortly after 2 a.m. in the parking lot of the 7-Eleven store at Route 3 and Waugh Chapel Road, police said.The driver appeared to be intoxicated, so the officer arrested her, police said. When he searched the woman and the car, he found the cash, a small amount of marijuana, a portable electronic scale, 40 small plastic bags and about $1,300 worth of what tested positive for crack cocaine, police said.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1996
Police arrested a Gambrills couple on drug charges yesterday and seized nearly $650, a police report said.The arrests took place after Officer Daniel Sereboff pulled over a car for speeding shortly after 2 a.m. in the parking lot of the 7-Eleven store at Route 3 and Waugh Chapel Road, police said.The driver appeared to be intoxicated, so the officer arrested her, police said. When he searched the woman and the car, he found the cash, a small amount of marijuana, a portable electronic scale, 40 small plastic bags and about $1,300 worth of what tested positive for crack cocaine, police said.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1995
Two teen-agers approached a Baltimore police officer patrolling the Eastern District last night, doused him with gasoline and unsuccessfully attempted to set him on fire, police said.Officer Erich Deiker, 30, who briefly chased his assailants before being overcome by the gasoline fumes, was taken to the Wilmer Eye Clinic at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he was examined and released, police said.Officer Deiker, who has been on the force for four years, was sitting in his patrol car in the 1500 block of Biddle St. about 6:15 p.m. with the window down when a male teen-ager on a red mountain bike rode by and squirted gasoline into the car, said Officer Sabrina V. Tapp-Harper, a police spokeswoman.
NEWS
August 21, 1992
Nichelle Nicole Preston should be preparing for cheerleading practice at Glen Burnie High School. Instead, she is dead. She died a week shy of her 17th birthday, from inhaling butane fumes from a can. There are many senseless ways to die, but it is hard to imagine a greater waste than this.So far, the war on drugs has isolated the "sexy" drugs -- cocaine, heroin, marijuana -- as the enemy while ignoring cruder but equally dangerous substances like butane. That has been a mistake.Though deaths from inhalant abuse are rare, Ms. Preston's tragedy reflects what experts say is a growing trend toward abuse of cheap, easily obtained household items -- metallic spray paints, solvents, cleaning fluids, gasoline, even the "white-out" used for typewriter corrections.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | August 12, 1992
Student school board member Jay Witcher fought back tears last week, speaking about the death of his Glen Burnie High School classmate, Nikki Preston."
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer Staff writer Rafael Alvarez contributed to this article | August 1, 1992
Death by inhalant abuse is so rare in Maryland that the medical examiner's office throws it into the catch-all classification known as "other."But statistics from the state's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration indicate that the habit of sniffing butane, gasoline and other petroleum distillates has a small, but growing following.Inhalants were cited by 5.3 percent of all admissions in the state's drug and alcohol treatment programs in 1991, said the administration's director, Rick Sampson, up from 3.3 percent in 1990.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | August 1, 1992
Nikki Preston would have been 17 Monday. Instead, the Glen Burnie girl, who died from inhaling butane gas in search of a high, will be buried Monday in Loudon Park Cemetery.Yesterday, her father, Burl, 49, pleaded for teen-agers to "break their code of silence" about sniffing butane gas and help each other."They call them friends but they let them die," he said, bursting into tears.Mr. Preston joined County Councilman Edward C. Middlebrooks, whose daughter, Jennifer, was a friend of Nikki's, in urging Anne Arundel County police to investigate the extent of butane abuse among area teen-agers.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
Alexander Morris gently plated seasoned chicken pieces atop creamy risotto and garnish, while Tyler Weedon whisked a fish reduction, a brownish sauce. Nearby, Kara Lovalvo used a meat thermometer to measure the heat of a lobster tail, and Eric Orlean assembled the dessert - a banana chocolate Bavarian. Though preparing the gourmet items posed a challenge for the culinary-minded teenagers from Howard County, the kitchen conditions made Wednesday's statewide cooking contest for high-schoolers even more daunting: Teams had to make the meal in one hour using only two butane burners for heat.
NEWS
July 9, 1991
Concerned about the number of recent fires involving liquefied petroleum gas in Maryland, state Fire Marshal Rocco J. Gabriele has issued a list of safety tips for citizens who use the fuel.There are two types of liquefied petroleum gas (LP-gas), propane and butane. Propane is more commonly used.LP-gas is generally odorless and invisible in its natural state, but an odorant is added to the gas to help people easily detect the presence of the gas should a leak occur.* LP-gas cylinders should be stored and used in the upright position.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Donna Weaver and Kris Antonelli and Donna Weaver,Staff Writers | July 31, 1992
A 17-year-old Glen Burnie High School student died yesterday morning in a Brooklyn apartment after inhaling butane fumes from a can, Baltimore City police said.Nichelle Nicole Preston, of the 1800 block of Saunders Way in Harundale, was pronounced dead of cardiac arrest at Harbor Hospital Center shortly after 1 a.m., police and hospital officials said.The police report said that Miss Preston was spending the night at a friend's home in the 1100 block of Cambria St. when she inhaled the fumes.
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