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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
Yesterday, an evening of Charlie Chaplin. Tonight, Buster Keaton. Thank you, TCM."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The millionaire she's struggling to fall in love with buys Monica a restaurant, meaning she could finally realize her dream of becoming a head chef. But wouldn't accepting it lead poor Pete (Jon Favreau) to believe she likes him more than she does? Meanwhile, Joey and Chandler adopt an Easter chick and struggle to be the fowlest parents they can be. NBC."The World's Deadliest Volcanoes" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
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By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Hello. My name is Tim. And I'm an "I Love Lucy"-holic. Think less of me, if you must. It won't bother me. I have no intention of ever being cured, even if it means lifelong membership in The Friends of the Friendless (a "Lucy" reference, of course). It all started when I was a little boy (sorry, another "Lucy" reference). I discovered the greatest sitcom ever made - please, "Seinfeld" fans, do not even try - and that was that. Thanks to omnipresent reruns on Channel 5 in Washington, I would catch the show after school, after dinner, whenever.
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By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 1995
It's Buster Keaton's year, and it's about time.There's a good, new biography ("Buster Keaton: Cut to the Chase," by Marion Meade), Keaton's classic films have been released by Kino Video, and a sterling lineup will be shown this week during American Movie Classic's Third Annual Film Preservation Festival.This year's festival focuses on comedy, with 24-hour marathons devoted to Laurel and Hardy, Bob Hope, Jerry Lewis and to Keaton (on Wednesday), which also happens to be his 100th birthday.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
The most towering figure in Hollywood history wore ill-fitting clothes, including shoes several sizes too big, and never said a word. Beginning Saturday, he'll be spending a year at Baltimore's Charles Theatre . Charlie Chaplin, a British expatriate who became the first Hollywood superstar and made a series of films — as writer, director and star — still as astonishingly delightful today as they were in the 1920s, is the subject of a...
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 10, 1999
German composer and percussionist Steven Garling will headline a program of screenings, sneak previews and surprises on Sunday at the Charles Theatre.Garling will accompany "Berlin, Symphony of a Great City," the silent 1927 German Expressionist classic. In a similar vein, local musician Anne Watts will lead her band, Boister, in an accompaniment to Buster Keaton's classic comedy "Steamboat Bill, Jr."Baltimore filmmaker Steven Yeager ("Divine Trash") will play host at the event, which will include a trailer from Joy Lusco and Scott Kecken's coming documentary about Arabbers, and new work from Martha Colburn.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1997
If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then cable's USA network must be making NBC blush."Lassie" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- When TV Guide listed the Top 50 TV stars of all time, only one walked on all fours: a certain collie whose career dates back more than half a century. Here's the latest incarnation, a 1994 film starring Frederic Forrest, Helen Slater and Richard Farnsworth. The plot: Lassie looks out for a pair of unhappy tykes who have moved with their father and stepmother from the city back to the country farmhouse where their mother grew up. ABC."
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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2006
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire [Warner Home Video] $29 "Family" films are not strictly for the kids. A lot of adults love to watch old Disney films from their youth and rush to theaters, with kids or not, to see the newest animated film or the latest Harry Potter saga. The two-disc set of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire follows the pattern of the previous three Potter films -- games for younger viewers and documentaries on the elaborate production, plus interviews with the three stars for older viewers.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | May 11, 2007
Movies that have been key to the struggle over film censorship are planned for the next four Saturdays at the Charles Theatre, beginning tomorrow with 1933's Baby Face. Director Alfred E. Green's Baby Face (1933) stars Barbara Stanwyck as Lily, a hardened character who, after years of being pimped by her louse of a father, opportunistically sleeps her way to the top of a New York office skyscraper. The print being screened tomorrow is a recently discovered unedited version. Showtime is noon tomorrow, preceded at 11 a.m. by a preview and discussion of the film by local movie critic Mike Giuliano.
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By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1998
Now that the dust has settled, the American Film Institute's canonization of the "greatest 100 American movies of all time" has inspired a few random observations:United Artists - This studio was responsible for the most titles on the list - 18. Formed in 1919 by Charlie Chaplin, D.W. Griffith, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks Sr. as a refuge from the predations of exploitative studios, UA stayed true to its mission throughout economic busts and booms...
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
One of the singular pleasures of watching "The Impostors," the new comedy by protean actor Stanley Tucci ("Big Night"), is the sound of the audience's laughter during the opening sequence of the movie.Tucci and Oliver Platt are engaged in a routine most often associated with the work of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton -- a comic pas de deux that involves much pantomimed confusion over tables and chairs, cigarettes and a girl, and that ends in a donnybrook of flying fists and a gothic death.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | May 11, 2007
Movies that have been key to the struggle over film censorship are planned for the next four Saturdays at the Charles Theatre, beginning tomorrow with 1933's Baby Face. Director Alfred E. Green's Baby Face (1933) stars Barbara Stanwyck as Lily, a hardened character who, after years of being pimped by her louse of a father, opportunistically sleeps her way to the top of a New York office skyscraper. The print being screened tomorrow is a recently discovered unedited version. Showtime is noon tomorrow, preceded at 11 a.m. by a preview and discussion of the film by local movie critic Mike Giuliano.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2006
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire [Warner Home Video] $29 "Family" films are not strictly for the kids. A lot of adults love to watch old Disney films from their youth and rush to theaters, with kids or not, to see the newest animated film or the latest Harry Potter saga. The two-disc set of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire follows the pattern of the previous three Potter films -- games for younger viewers and documentaries on the elaborate production, plus interviews with the three stars for older viewers.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 30, 2004
Buster Keaton's sixth feature comedy, Seven Chances, starts as a modest, chucklesome farce about a man's race to get married in one afternoon so he can inherit $7 million. It builds into a paranoid epic that induces euphoria. This often overlooked masterpiece demonstrates how beautifully Keaton, as star and as director, united comedy and moviemaking. (It plays at Creative Alliance at the Patterson tonight at 8, with live accompaniment by Anne Watts and Boister - see Carl Schoettler's feature article from yesterday's editions at www.sunspot.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 28, 2003
Many writers have soared into reverie for Greta Garbo - most famously Kenneth Tynan when he wrote, "What when drunk one sees in other women, one sees in Garbo sober." But too often that mode of praise feeds into her mystique without crediting her amazing skill. Tonight at 7:30, as part of Vivat!, the Walters Arts Museum, the Maryland Film Festival and the Johns Hopkins Film and Media Studies program will present the 1927 silent romance Love, featuring Garbo's incandescent first performance in the role of Anna Karenina (she did the more famous sound version in 1935)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 18, 2001
To jump-start Creative Alliance Movie Makers' new membership drive, the ultra-eclectic cabaret accordionist and composer Anne Watts and her group Boister will play their original score to Buster Keaton's mind-expanding silent comedy "Steamboat Bill, Jr." tonight at 9:30 at 413 S. Conkling St. Here are 10 reasons why this is a perfect night out for movie-lovers as well as an ideal event for a group that sponsors independent regional production on film, video or digital. 1. Buster Keaton was one of the great independent moviemakers, and "Steamboat Bill, Jr."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 10, 1999
German composer and percussionist Steven Garling will headline a program of screenings, sneak previews and surprises on Sunday at the Charles Theatre.Garling will accompany "Berlin, Symphony of a Great City," the silent 1927 German Expressionist classic. In a similar vein, local musician Anne Watts will lead her band, Boister, in an accompaniment to Buster Keaton's classic comedy "Steamboat Bill, Jr."Baltimore filmmaker Steven Yeager ("Divine Trash") will play host at the event, which will include a trailer from Joy Lusco and Scott Kecken's coming documentary about Arabbers, and new work from Martha Colburn.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 28, 2003
Many writers have soared into reverie for Greta Garbo - most famously Kenneth Tynan when he wrote, "What when drunk one sees in other women, one sees in Garbo sober." But too often that mode of praise feeds into her mystique without crediting her amazing skill. Tonight at 7:30, as part of Vivat!, the Walters Arts Museum, the Maryland Film Festival and the Johns Hopkins Film and Media Studies program will present the 1927 silent romance Love, featuring Garbo's incandescent first performance in the role of Anna Karenina (she did the more famous sound version in 1935)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 30, 2004
Buster Keaton's sixth feature comedy, Seven Chances, starts as a modest, chucklesome farce about a man's race to get married in one afternoon so he can inherit $7 million. It builds into a paranoid epic that induces euphoria. This often overlooked masterpiece demonstrates how beautifully Keaton, as star and as director, united comedy and moviemaking. (It plays at Creative Alliance at the Patterson tonight at 8, with live accompaniment by Anne Watts and Boister - see Carl Schoettler's feature article from yesterday's editions at www.sunspot.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
One of the singular pleasures of watching "The Impostors," the new comedy by protean actor Stanley Tucci ("Big Night"), is the sound of the audience's laughter during the opening sequence of the movie.Tucci and Oliver Platt are engaged in a routine most often associated with the work of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton -- a comic pas de deux that involves much pantomimed confusion over tables and chairs, cigarettes and a girl, and that ends in a donnybrook of flying fists and a gothic death.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1998
Now that the dust has settled, the American Film Institute's canonization of the "greatest 100 American movies of all time" has inspired a few random observations:United Artists - This studio was responsible for the most titles on the list - 18. Formed in 1919 by Charlie Chaplin, D.W. Griffith, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks Sr. as a refuge from the predations of exploitative studios, UA stayed true to its mission throughout economic busts and booms...
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