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December 6, 2011
Has Harford's BRAC boom gone bust? Way back when it first came to light that the U.S. Base Closure and Realignment Commission (known by the curiously jumbled acronym BRAC) would take action resulting in a net expansion at Aberdeen Proving Ground, the first reaction locally was a sigh of relief. After all, there had been concern that APG could be one of those military installations that would end up being closed. Relief gave way to near jubilation, especially in local government circles, as BRAC became synonymous with feast locally, even as it has come to mean famine in places where military installations have been mothballed.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 17, 2014
Thirty-five years ago, when the number of homeless people in Baltimore was noticeably on the rise, several reasons were given: mental illness and deinstitutionalization, the city's relatively high unemployment rate, drug addiction, family dysfunction and evictions, the lack of affordable housing and the problem of ex-offenders being released from prison without a welcoming destination. At the same time, more and more people, including children, were showing up for lunch and dinner at a growing number of soup kitchens.
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SPORTS
January 5, 2010
No. 6 Boise State uses a 30-yard pass on a fake punt from its 33-yard line to set up a tie-breaking fourth-quarter touchdown and lead the Broncos to a 17-10 victory over No. 3 Texas Christian in a battle of unbeaten teams that were denied a spot in the Bowl Championship Series title game. Article, PG 14
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
A predicted "storm" of meteors overnight turned out to be mostly a bust, though some in the Midwest U.S. got a better glimpse of the shower than in the mid-Atlantic. The Earth was expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR. Astronomers predicted anywhere from 100 to 400 "shooting stars" per hour, with a peak from 2-4 a.m. Saturday. Instead, the shower peaked at only around 5-10 meteors per hour, astronomers said.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
P rogress, outfitted with stainless steel, granite, roof decks and parking pads, marched into such working-class bastions as Canton and Locust Point. The decorator appointments cracked the neighborhoods' Formstone-encrusted hearts and lured a new breed of city dweller: younger, ambitious, professional. Longtime residents shook their heads at the endless parade of yuppies and U-Hauls and watched, bewildered, as microbrew pubs replaced corner bars and boutiques moved onto Broadway and the Avenue - our Main Streets.
NEWS
January 13, 2014
I have been duped. When I heard of Dennis Rodman's initial visit to North Korea, I held onto a sliver of hope that it would possibly open a window of diplomatic negotiations with the nation ensconced in secrecy and carefully crafted propaganda ("Rodman, in trouble over interview, blames drink," Jan. 9). I couldn't have been more wrong. Mr. Rodman is simply a self-serving man who seeks media attention, not unlike that of the Kardashian clan. Mr. Rodman knows nothing about American missionary Kenneth Bae, and proved it in during a drunken rant at a recent press conference.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 11, 2010
From Jay Hancock's blog: A column about BGE's smart meters last month had a throwaway line about how digital meters could blow the whistle on your marijuana grow lights. I hadn't thought much about it, but that's what people seem to believe will happen on a large scale in British Columbia, which is to pot what Texas is to oil. It's not that pot growers are using metered kilowatts to grow their weed. Rather, they're pirating electricity by tapping the lines and routing it, unmetered, to their nurseries.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
A predicted "storm" of meteors overnight turned out to be mostly a bust, though some in the Midwest U.S. got a better glimpse of the shower than in the mid-Atlantic. The Earth was expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR. Astronomers predicted anywhere from 100 to 400 "shooting stars" per hour, with a peak from 2-4 a.m. Saturday. Instead, the shower peaked at only around 5-10 meteors per hour, astronomers said.
FEATURES
By ELSA KLENSCH and ELSA KLENSCH,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 25, 1997
I secretly dread trying on swimsuits because I have a flat chest and heavy thighs.When I went shopping recently, the saleswoman insisted I try on a padded top to "fill me out."I left the store empty-handed. Any ideas about enhancing my bust without padding. Any ideas?There are ways to use design to your advantage. Look for suits with draping or shirring across the chest. Both give a natural roundness. Bold patterns or prints are also effective. A brilliantly colored, eye-catching pattern on the bust will visually build it up and give the illusion of fullness.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
A strong odor of marijuana in a Joppa home where Harford County sheriff's deputies had responded to settle a domestic dispute on Sunday has led to the arrests of a young couple and the seizure of about eight pounds of marijuana, the Harford County Sheriff's Office said Thursday. Deputies responded to the home in the 800 block of Chatfield Road about 12:15 p.m. for a report of a verbal altercation between Michael Allen Brandt, 26, and Julia Michele Leonard, 24, the sheriff's office said.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Two Brooklyn residents were arrested, and more than $3,200 worth of drugs were seized following a Thursday raid in Anne Arundel County, police said. At around 10 a.m., Anne Arundel County Police's Tactical Narcotics Team for the Northern District executed a narcotics search warrant at a home in the 600 block of Wood Street after receiving complaints of drug activity, according to a news release. Detectives seized 16.92 grams of heroin valued at $2,030, 13.23 grams of crack cocaine valued at $1,190, $3,142 in cash, 37 prescription pills, a 2003 Lexus 4-door vehicle, a 2001 Dodge truck and packaging materials for distribution in the operation.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Anne Arundel County police arrested several people after allegedly finding illegal drugs in a hotel room in Annapolis Carlos Dewayne Abney Jr., 25, of Annapolis; Lauren Zhane Surgeon, 18, of Annapolis; and William Hunter Hardesty, 26, of Riva were arrested in a room around 1:39 p.m. in the Extended Stay of America in the unit block of Womack Drive. Abney and Surgeon were arrested on charges including possession of controlled dangerous substances with intent to distribute, and Hardesty was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia, all according to online court records.
NEWS
January 13, 2014
I have been duped. When I heard of Dennis Rodman's initial visit to North Korea, I held onto a sliver of hope that it would possibly open a window of diplomatic negotiations with the nation ensconced in secrecy and carefully crafted propaganda ("Rodman, in trouble over interview, blames drink," Jan. 9). I couldn't have been more wrong. Mr. Rodman is simply a self-serving man who seeks media attention, not unlike that of the Kardashian clan. Mr. Rodman knows nothing about American missionary Kenneth Bae, and proved it in during a drunken rant at a recent press conference.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
For half a decade, the Ravens spoiled their faithful fans. With Joe Flacco under center and John Harbaugh wearing the head coach's headset, the Ravens went to the playoffs five years in a row, the only team to accomplish that feat over that span. They played in three AFC championship games, winning one of them along with the Super Bowl in New Orleans last winter. Flacco and Harbaugh brought necessary clutch quarterback play and stability to an organization that has mined and refined talent with the best of them.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
In one of the largest drug busts at the port of Baltimore in years, U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents seized two gym bags stuffed with nearly 128 pounds of cocaine from a Panamanian shipping container. Customs agents put the estimated street value of the drugs at $4 million. "'Tis the season for giving, but sometimes it's better to just seize," the agency said Tuesday in a statement announcing the Dec. 18 bust. The last cocaine seizure of such significant weight at the port was in 2007, when 310 pounds of the drug was found in three duffel bags inside a refrigerated container arriving from Ecuador, customs officials said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Police conducting a search warrant in West Baltimore got a surprise when they encountered three alligators, a pit bull and a turtle.  On Nov. 21 police raided a second-floor apartment in the 1900 block of McCulloh St., in the Druid Heights neighborhood, where they found smoking devices, razors, and baggies with drug residue, and ammunition, police wrote in a court documents. Also in the hallway: two alligators and a turtle. A pit bull was in the kitchen, and another alligator was found in the rear second-floor bedroom.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | March 18, 2011
Former Ravens quarterback Kyle Boller never came close to touching the lofty expectations that came with being one of the team's first-round picks in the 2003 NFL draft, which is why last month I labeled him as the biggest draft bust in franchise history . Matt Zenitz, a writer for PressBox , recently tagged Boller as an all-time bust , too. But one man is willing to stand up on a soapbox and defend Boller: Joe Platania. In a response to his PressBox colleague, Platania wrote a lengthy post in defense of Boller , who is still in the NFL today as a backup quarterback for the Raiders.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
The two houses are across the street from each other on Camrose Avenue in Brooklyn Park — a two story bungalow and a one-story ranch. The lawns are mowed, flowers fill the planters and one has a plastic toy basketball hoop. The narrow street starts at a cemetery on busy Ritchie Highway, sandwiched between two used motorcycle shops. But it quickly becomes typically suburban, lined with small but comfortable and well-kept homes with neatly trimmed hedges. Anne Arundel County police announced Wednesday that two weeks ago they raided the bungalow and the ranch, along with six other homes, as part of a six-month investigation into the sale of cocaine and prescription medicines.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | November 21, 2013
Colleges Terps ' Likely named ECAC D-I special teamer of the week Maryland freshman Will Likely was named the Eastern College Athletic Conference Division I Special Teams Player of the Week. Likely returned a punt 63 yards for a touchdown for the Terps ' first score in their 27-24 overtime road win at Virginia Tech on Saturday. It was the first touchdown of Likely's career and Maryland's first punt return for a score since 2010. Likely averaged 26.5 yards on four punt returns and finished the game with 179 all-purpose yards.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun and By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
As they rushed toward a suburban Utah home with guns drawn, agents knew they were on to a significant figure in the  Silk   Road  online drug bazaar -- a major cocaine dealer, perhaps.  Message boards on  Silk   Road  -- the world's most popular online drug market -- had been buzzing about the sale that triggered this bust. Users of the encrypted website advertised drugs, forged documents and hacking tools for sale through seemingly anonymous transactions, but a kilo of pure Peruvian cocaine was something special.  Federal authorities in Baltimore had been working for a year to breach the inner circle of  Silk   Road's  kingpin, whom they knew only by the alias Dread Pirate Roberts.
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