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By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | December 5, 1994
The Howard County PTA Council wants the county school board to take another look at its policy of not providing buses for elementary school pupils who live less than a mile from schools -- a policy that parents say forces some children to walk along dangerous routes.The council soon will launch a survey at all county schools to determine the safety of children's walking paths, whether the paths need to be patrolled or whether all students should be bused. Older students ride buses if they live more than 1.5 miles from schools.
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By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
More than 600 Marylanders marched with hundreds of thousands of others in New York City Sunday in support of stronger action to address climate change, according to organizers of the state effort. People boarded 13 chartered buses to join the   People's Climate March   from cities across Maryland, organizers said, including Baltimore, Annapolis, College Park, Greenbelt, Columbia, Frederick and Silver Spring. Seth Bush, coordinator of the Maryland contingent, called the level of support from the state "overwhelming.
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NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2002
Principal Stephen Gibson, Three years ago, a group of parents from the Columbia neighborhood of Clemens Crossing pooled their money to hire buses that would transport more than 100 kids from older, more diverse Wilde Lake Middle School to the newer Lime Kiln Middle in Fulton. That unusual decision sparked an angry response from many in Columbia who thought the parents were taking advantage of Howard County's open-enrollment policy to run away from the educational and social problems that came with diversity.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
This week, youngsters across Maryland will board the "big yellow cheese wagon," as it's sometimes called, and head back to school. And chances are high (aside perhaps from those teary-eyed moms and dads waving good-bye to their kindergartners for the first time), the school bus commute from home to classroom will take place without incident. But the latest survey conducted by the Maryland State Department of Education shows that the students' fate is being tempted on a regular basis by drivers who seem either unaware of the law or unwilling to follow it. Drivers are forbidden to pass a bus in either direction when its stop arm swings out and its lights are flashing, yet that happens all the time.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1998
Twenty-four years ago this spring, white parents and students picketed Baltimore's school board with signs that read "We're staying at our schools: No to busing."A generation later, some of the students who were bused to desegregate schools are now parents. And they are complaining about the issue of busing their elementary schoolchildren.But this time, it is a protest of a different sort: Some white parents in Carrollton Ridge desperately want their children to stay at the primarily black school they are being bused to, bypassing a neighborhood school.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1997
Wayne K. Curry remembers the summer 38 years ago when his father told him and his brother Daryl they would be leaving their all-black elementary school for the all-white school closer to home."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1997
After a quarter century of court-ordered busing, Prince George's County officials believe they have the evidence to persuade a federal judge to relinquish control of their school system.In their hands is a report by four education experts that concludes busing no longer serves a purpose in a school system that has gone from three-quarters white to three-quarters black.School officials have done everything possible to end discrimination against black students, the experts said. Further, busing students from their neighborhoods to someone else's is doing little to erase segregation, and in some cases may be making it worse.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1998
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS ago this winter, several of us from The Sun trooped down to Prince George's County to cover what would be the biggest Maryland education story of 1973: sweeping court-ordered busing.It was a big story because widespread busing hadn't been attempted in the suburbs of the North -- well, Prince George's is south of the Mason-Dixon Line but still a relatively sophisticated suburban district enrolling, among others, the children of many federal workers.Prince George's schools then were 75 percent white, and many white parents raised a ruckus for months, even years, after the day in late January that the buses first rolled.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 27, 2001
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - On both sides of the issue, they say the same thing: It's not about race. But with a group of white parents heading to federal court today seeking to halt busing and other school integration measures, it is perhaps more accurate to say this: It is about race, but it's not only about race. "What Charlotte is struggling with," says Ricky Woods, senior pastor of the city's oldest black Baptist congregation, "is the moral soul of its community." The parents' lawsuit has touched a deep nerve here, tapping into the city's sense of both its past and its future.
NEWS
October 8, 1997
Rosemary Gunning,92, who parlayed activism against mandatory school busing into a leadership role in New York's fledgling Conservative Party, died Sunday in Roslyn, N.Y.Pub Date: 10/08/97
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
About a dozen schoolchildren at the Willows Apartments in Glen Burnie queued up curbside as the Anne Arundel County school bus pulled up. Some kids were flanked by parents and toddler siblings who appeared just as excited to see the bus; the moment had all the trappings of the first day of school. But that's a few weeks away. Instead, the bus had come with a mainstay for students in the area: healthy meals. School officials opened the rear of the bus and set up tables with some of the same food offered during the school year, feeding not only the schoolchildren but siblings who won't begin classes for a couple of years.
NEWS
By Randal O'Toole | July 31, 2014
Transit agencies from Baltimore to San Diego and from Seattle to St. Petersburg are planning new light-rail lines. Yet light rail is not only vastly more expensive than buses, it is slower, less comfortable, less convenient and has lower capacities than a well-designed rapid-bus system. Being expensive to build, light rail can only reach parts of a region and thus most people have to drive to a park-and-ride station or transfer from a bus to train and back, thus lengthening the time of their trip.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Users of the Maryland Transit Administration's bus system will be able to track buses in their area via their smartphones and other mobile devices starting this fall, one of many changes announced Monday as part of the agency's multiyear bus improvement plan. Riders will also see updated bus schedules, additional MTA supervisors showing up along bus routes and increased service to certain job centers, such as the rising Horseshoe Casino Baltimore on Russell Street. The changes are part of the agency's Bus Network Improvement Project, which was launched last summer with the goal of improving service using the input of local residents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The Maryland Film Festival, which for the first time this year will not be showing the majority of its films at a single location, will have shuttles transporting moviegoers among its seven venues. Free shuttles will be running about every 10 minutes, festival director Jed Dietz said. The venues include the Maryland Institute College of Art Lazarus Graduate Studio Center, 131 W. North Ave.; the Windup Space, 12 W. North Ave.; University of Baltimore Business Center, 11 W. Mount Royal Ave.; UB Langsdale Auditorium, 1420 Maryland Ave. (entrance off Oliver Street)
NEWS
August 22, 2013
Thousands of people are expected to descend on Washington this weekend to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington civil rights event. Several events are planned for the weekend and on Wednesday, Aug. 28, the anniversary of the day of the march. Baltimore-area civil rights groups are scrambling to keep up with the demand for bus reservations. Tessa Hill-Aston, president of the Baltimore chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said that "the phones are jumping off the hook" with requests for transportation to Washington.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
Imagine for a moment that you are in a hurry. It's 7:30 in the morning, and you're stuck in your car late for work on a two-lane suburban road behind a big yellow school bus that's stopping frequently to pick up kids. Might you be tempted to pass it even as its lights are flashing and the driver has the "stop" arm extended? Probably not. But then perhaps you would. Just a few months ago, Maryland school bus drivers completed their annual one-day tally of drivers who dare to pass them as they are picking up youngsters.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1995
Sociologist James S. Coleman had more than his allotted 15 minutes of fame. But when he died in Chicago 10 days ago, the news trickled out and found its way to obituary pages deep within the nation's newspapers.Had Dr. Coleman died a quarter of a century earlier, when he was head of the social relations department at the Johns Hopkins University and the chief author of the 1966 "Coleman Report," the news would have recommended itself immediately to front pages.In those days, the Hopkins professor was reviled in the South, then undergoing massive school desegregation, much of it relying on the Coleman Report as a rationale for busing to achieve racial balance.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
You probably won't hear these buses coming. If they show up as expected on the Howard Transit Green Route in the spring of 2015, they'll be the first of their kind in Maryland to run a municipal loop. They will likely be greeted with fanfare, even if they won't make much noise themselves - since they'll run entirely on electricity. "They're very quiet," said John Powell, administrator for the county's Office of Transportation. "One of the interesting aspects of the electric buses is you hear everything else" but the engine.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 5, 2013
Riders used to seeing white, Connect-A-Ride buses along the G route could be confused by red and white vehicles at bus stops this week that have a CMRT logo emblazoned on the side. Central Maryland Regional Transit (formerly CTC), which manages the local bus system in Laurel and surrounding counties, has changed the bus service's logo, and the Connect-A-Ride brand is no more. CMRT officials held a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Laurel Municipal Center April 3 to unveil the system's new logo and rolled out the first bus displaying the new design.
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