Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBusinesses
IN THE NEWS

Businesses

BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore may lose hundreds of jobs, tens of millions of dollars in economic activity and half of the port's containerized cargo following the state's decision not to build a new rail cargo transfer facility in Morrell Park. State and port officials scrambled Friday to outline alternatives to shoring up Baltimore's place in the international shipping industry ahead of the widening of the Panama Canal and the anticipated growth in Asian container traffic on the East Coast. The rail facility was meant to bring Baltimore's limited freight capacity up to par with other East Coast ports by allowing CSX Transportation to stack truck-sized shipping containers two high on trains for more efficient transportation inland.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Edith Henrietta Cooper, a retired Baltimore city public school crossing guard who was once voted the city's most popular safety officer in a newspaper contest, died of a respiratory ailment Aug 20 at Saint Agnes Medical Center. The Irvington resident was 92. Born Edith Henrietta Jackson in Blackstone, Va., she was the daughter of Purcell Jackson and Gertrude Yates Jackson, who were farmers. She moved to Baltimore with her family when she was 6 years old and lived on West Lee Street in a home near Oriole Park at Camden Yards . "We were a poor family, and my mother would have walked to classes at the old Frederick Douglass High School on Carey Street, where she graduated in 1939," said her daughter, Barbara Cooper Lee of Brooklyn, N.Y. "She was the product of a religious South Baltimore family and she received her early Christian nurturing in Leadenhall Baptist Church.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Liberty Tsakalos, a former corporate treasurer who managed the retail shop of the H&S Bakery, the Southeast Baltimore family-owned business that was co-founded by her husband, brother and father, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease complications at her Harbor East home. She was 94. "She was an anomaly of her time. She was a strong woman working in a man's world, which was especially true of the commercial baking industry in the 1950s and '60s," said her grandson Michael Tsakalos of Hunt Valley.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
When developing countries need to deepen a canal for irrigation or navigation, they frequently call on Ellicott Dredges, a 129-year-old Baltimore-based maker of dredging equipment. To sell their massive, multimillion-dollar machines abroad, Ellicott Dredges often turns to the U.S. Export-Import Bank — an obscure federal agency that facilitated more than $37 billion in exports last year. The 80-year-old bank, a New Deal-era institution that provides loans and credit guarantees, is now at the center of a debate between conservative Republicans and the rest of Congress.
NEWS
By Robert P. Giloth and Maureen Conway | August 14, 2014
Last month's enactment of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), so long in the making, is a milestone. It makes important updates to our workforce training system and demonstrates national support for the expanded use of sector strategies that forge training partnerships between employers, nonprofits, foundations and public agencies. But WIOA is still just a first step in addressing the problem of connecting people to jobs. We need to build on it to establish a true and equitable apprenticeship system in the United States.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 13, 2014
In recent weeks, the managers, employees and customers of a New England chain of supermarkets called Market Basket have joined together to oppose the board of director's decision in June to oust the chain's popular chief executive, Arthur T. Demoulas. Their demonstrations and boycotts have emptied most of the chain's 71 stores. What was so special about Arthur T., as he's known? Mainly, his business model. He kept prices lower than his competitors, paid his employees more, and gave them and his managers more authority.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
"Charge 'em for the lice, extra for the mice Two percent for looking in the mirror twice Here a little slice, there a little cut Three percent for sleeping with the window shut... " - "Master of the House," Les Miserables A business owner in Baltimore could be excused for feeling like he's living permanently in Monsieur Thénardier's inn from Les Miserables. On top of the highest income and property tax rates in the state, business owners here must contend with the Byzantine set of fees for what are known as "minor privileges" - everything from a table and chairs on the sidewalk outside a cafe to, rather famously, a papier mache flamingo suspended 20 feet above the ground.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In Baltimore, some business owners say they're constantly nagged by city fees for making improvements to their stores. Add a bike rack outside? There's a fee for that. Put up a security camera? Another fee. Add more lighting? There's a fee for that, too. That's why some are expressing disappointment that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake used her first veto since taking office in 2010 to strike down a bill aimed at reducing or eliminating many of the so-called "minor privilege" fees the city charges.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Zaleski and For The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In August 2006, Millennial Media -- a digital advertising company founded in Baltimore just two months prior -- made a move that shaped its future. The company's three co-founders took up office space inside the Emerging Technology Center (ETC), an incubator of startup technology companies that opened its doors in the Signature Building of the Can Company complex in Canton in 1999. Two years later, when Millennial Media moved out of the ETC and into the complex's adjacent Factory Building in October 2008, it was a company of 85 full-time employees.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Howard M. "Smitty" Smith, who had owned and operated a Baltimore County horse transportation business, died July 31 of heart failure at Winter Haven Hospital in Winter Haven, Fla. He was 83. The son of Howard Smith, a factory worker, and Katherine Smith, a homemaker, Howard Milton Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in a mill house on Ash Street in Hampden. He attended city public and vocational schools and went to work in 1950 as a mover for Hampden Moving and Storage Co. on Falls Road.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.