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By Arthur Hirsch and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 9, 2010
Supporters of a business tax deduction to help private and public schools that has failed in past legislative sessions hoped this year would be different. Plans by the Archdiocese of Baltimore to close 13 schools brought attention to the bill, Gov. Martin O'Malley wrote a letter endorsing it and, for the first time, Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien made the trip to Annapolis to lobby for passage. But with only days left in the session, the legislation has again stalled in the House committee where it has died twice before.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The Annapolis City Council adopted a $96.5 million operating budget early Tuesday morning that lays off seven employees, increases a tax on businesses and increases some parking fines. The budget also eliminates the Annapolis Economic Development Corp., which was created in 2010 to attract and promote businesses in the city. The agency's funding, which was $450,000 this year, will run out at the end of the month as the fiscal year ends. Businesses could pay up to $150 more per year due to a 17 percent increase in the personal property tax, which is a tax on equipment and merchandise that's paid by all businesses, according to Brian Woodward, acting city manager.
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BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1998
The state comptroller's office is taking its tradition of innovative technology a step further, announcing today that it is the first in the nation to put registration for business tax accounts online.A partnership with Microsoft Corp. and local technology firm Dynatech Integrated Systems in Columbia will allow new Maryland business operators to use computers to set up a variety of tax accounts, including unemployment insurance, said Marvin Bond, a spokesman for the comptroller's office."It unchains the business person or accountant from paper, and it unchains us from processing paper," Bond said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
The attorney for ousted Anne Arundel County Councilman Daryl D. Jones said Monday her client made a mistake in failing to file tax returns for several years, but she said that after serving his time, Jones is "fit to be a lawyer and he is fit to be a member of the County Council. " Attorney Linda Schuett made the case for Jones in Annapolis before retired Circuit Judge Arthur Ahalt, who will determine whether Jones will get his seat on the council back. Jones, a Severn Democrat who was first elected to the County Council in 2006 and re-elected in 2010, was charged in August 2011 with failing to file several personal and business tax returns between 2002 and 2007.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | March 2, 2010
Advocates of a business tax credit that would support private and public education hope that the Archdiocese of Baltimore's plan to announce school closings this week will heighten the sense of urgency about the legislation before the General Assembly. Supporters of the tax credit bills will rally outside the State House in Annapolis on Wednesday morning as a preamble to an afternoon Senate committee hearing. The Senate and House legislation - which would give Maryland businesses a 75 percent state tax credit for donations to organizations supporting scholarships and school programs - has been introduced four times before.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
An Anne Arundel councilman was sentenced to five months in federal prison Monday on a charge that he failed to file nearly three dozen personal and business tax returns over a six-year period. Councilman Daryl D. Jones, a Democrat from Severn who is a practicing criminal defense attorney, was also sentenced to one year of supervised probation and six months of home detention during an emotionally charged hearing held in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. "This has been an extremely embarrassing and humbling experience," said Jones, speaking to the judge.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Staff Writer | November 13, 1993
Baltimore not only doesn't tax companies into running away but imposes the second-lightest total business tax burden of the country's 25 biggest cities, according to a study published yesterday.In a finding that directly contradicts a widespread perception that Baltimore and Maryland have an onerous business tax climate, the computer study ranked only Atlanta as having a tax climate more business-friendly than Baltimore's."That finding is absolutely right on the money," said Michael Conte, head of the University of Baltimore's Regional Economic Studies Program.
NEWS
February 22, 1994
Before the Carroll County commissioners agree to a tax credit for research and development equipment, they ought to consider what they would be buying for the estimated $50,000 to $70,000 in next year's tax revenue they would forgo.While this credit is not very large, it raises questions about the effectiveness of using tax breaks to lure business. Along with the credit, the commissioners are also considering waiving building permit fees and other fees for businesses. Tax abatements have proven to be only marginally effective in attracting businesses, according to published research.
EXPLORE
April 20, 2012
Thank you for your reporting and keeping the citizens aware of the General Assembly's activity in regards to taxes, fees and revenues, and subsequent speculation on how tax and fee revenues will be managed. The eyes of the nation's finance reporting were on the behavior of the Maryland governor and his proposed tax increases. While other states are developing processes to reduce citizen and business tax burdens, Maryland is the subject of reporting in financial publications. As a state, we're fortunate the General Assembly was able to hold the tax increase line and not increase taxes and fees.
NEWS
June 4, 2012
The grim May employment report, only 69,000 nonfarm jobs, is the third consecutive subpar tally, replete with downward revisions for the two prior months. It's a devastating number for the American economy. The Obama "Keynesian" government-spending model has proved to be a complete failure. President Barack Obama doesn't seem to understand businesses create jobs. And firms have to be profitable in order to hire. Yet the president's rhetoric is degrading the importance of profits.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Tax-break Enterprise Zones in Baltimore and the Eastern Shore will expand after getting an OK from Maryland's economic development agency, the state said Thursday. The city's zone was altered to include Harbor Point and nearby portions of South Central Avenue and South Eden Street "to further encourage the economic development of the Harbor East community," the state Department of Business and Economic Development said in a statement. Harbor Point and the nearby streets had been removed from the zone last year as part of a broad reduction in the eligible area.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 26, 2012
The grades for the year are in,and Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has received a C- from an environmental group disillusioned with his handling of conservation issues. The Anne Arundel chapter of the Maryland League of Conservation Voters faulted Leopold, whom it had previously endorsed, for not living up to promises it said he'd made about enforcing environmental laws and regulations - and for what it called his "utter failure" to push for county funding for controlling polluted storm-water runoff.
NEWS
June 4, 2012
The grim May employment report, only 69,000 nonfarm jobs, is the third consecutive subpar tally, replete with downward revisions for the two prior months. It's a devastating number for the American economy. The Obama "Keynesian" government-spending model has proved to be a complete failure. President Barack Obama doesn't seem to understand businesses create jobs. And firms have to be profitable in order to hire. Yet the president's rhetoric is degrading the importance of profits.
EXPLORE
April 20, 2012
Thank you for your reporting and keeping the citizens aware of the General Assembly's activity in regards to taxes, fees and revenues, and subsequent speculation on how tax and fee revenues will be managed. The eyes of the nation's finance reporting were on the behavior of the Maryland governor and his proposed tax increases. While other states are developing processes to reduce citizen and business tax burdens, Maryland is the subject of reporting in financial publications. As a state, we're fortunate the General Assembly was able to hold the tax increase line and not increase taxes and fees.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
The councilman who has sponsored legislation that would allow the County Council to replace Daryl D. Jones when he reports to prison later this month is predicting the move will sail through when the panel meets Tuesday. Councilman John J. Grasso, who introduced a resolution that would declare Jones' council seat vacant, said he expects passage for either his resolution or a similar measure — an outcome that would almost certainly send the issue to court. "It's over with," said Grasso, a Glen Burnie Republican who has pushed for Jones to resign.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
An Anne Arundel councilman was sentenced to five months in federal prison Monday on a charge that he failed to file nearly three dozen personal and business tax returns over a six-year period. Councilman Daryl D. Jones, a Democrat from Severn who is a practicing criminal defense attorney, was also sentenced to one year of supervised probation and six months of home detention during an emotionally charged hearing held in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. "This has been an extremely embarrassing and humbling experience," said Jones, speaking to the judge.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | December 13, 1994
In a sign that Maryland's economy continues to creep back from recession, the state announced yesterday that revenues for fiscal year 1995 will be about $148 million more than expected.Compared with Maryland's estimated $13 billion budget for next year, the extra money is minuscule. The state government could gobble it up in four days.But, for Gov.-elect Parris N. Glendening, it may provide a little cushion as he considers selective business tax cuts in an effort to create more jobs in the state.
NEWS
By Amanda Urban and Amanda Urban,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2002
The Arc of Anne Arundel County - a nonprofit organization that provides services for people with developmental disabilities and their families - may be able to provide an extra incentive for businesses to make a donation. Last spring, The Arc was granted $50,000 in business tax credits by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development's Neighborhood Partnership Program to fund an "assistive technology" program. The funds will be used to purchase technologies - panic buttons, touch screens or a computer system - to remind individuals to go to appointments, to pay bills or to turn off the stove.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
As Anne Arundel Councilman Daryl D. Jones prepares to head to federal prison for failing to file his tax returns, a number of his constituents in his northern county district said they would like to see the Severn Democrat keep his seat — and return after he's served his time — even as his opponents clamor for his resignation. Kevin Poole, owner of Kevin's Barber / Beauty Salon, nestled in a strip mall along Telegraph Road in Severn, said as he cut hair Wednesday afternoon that he feels Jones is being treated more harshly because he's a black elected official.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
An Anne Arundel County councilman pleaded guilty in federal court Tuesday to a charge that he failed to file several personal and business tax returns over the course of six years. Councilman Daryl D. Jones, a Democrat from Severn who is serving his second four-year term on the council, entered the plea in Baltimore before U.S. District Judge Ellen L. Hollander. Assistant U.S. Attorney Gregory Bockin said in court that Jones, a defense attorney in private practice, failed to file both his personal and payroll tax between 2002 and 2007.
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