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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Anthony Mayes was nearing age 50 when he got the first suit he ever owned, a dark gray Armani, and it seemed life, at last, would be better. He'd just been released from his latest time behind bars, making it about 22 years of his life total, for an array of charges including drugs and armed robbery. He said he's determined to make his most recent six-month stint his last, and sees the clothes - suit, shirt, tie, dress shoes - as part of that effort. "They make me feel important, like I can succeed," said Mayes, 49, who believes he's been given "an opportunity to redeem myself.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Anthony Mayes was nearing age 50 when he got the first suit he ever owned, a dark gray Armani, and it seemed life, at last, would be better. He'd just been released from his latest time behind bars, making it about 22 years of his life total, for an array of charges including drugs and armed robbery. He said he's determined to make his most recent six-month stint his last, and sees the clothes - suit, shirt, tie, dress shoes - as part of that effort. "They make me feel important, like I can succeed," said Mayes, 49, who believes he's been given "an opportunity to redeem myself.
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2009
I liked it better when my mother dressed me. I didn't have to think about whether I should attempt to match or contrast, or what shoes would look good with my selected ensemble. My mother probably didn't have to think too long about it, either, because I had only one pair of casual shoes and one pair of church shoes. And when I did put on a dress, nine times out of 10 it had a nautical theme. My parents liked navy blue and white. It's very crisp and impeccable, reminiscent of a uniform.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2009
I liked it better when my mother dressed me. I didn't have to think about whether I should attempt to match or contrast, or what shoes would look good with my selected ensemble. My mother probably didn't have to think too long about it, either, because I had only one pair of casual shoes and one pair of church shoes. And when I did put on a dress, nine times out of 10 it had a nautical theme. My parents liked navy blue and white. It's very crisp and impeccable, reminiscent of a uniform.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2000
Overlooked in the antitrust battle against the nation's software giant is this: Microsoft's complicity in the demise of the business suit. Microsoft - and its khakis-and-T-shirt cousins - have systematically untucked and short-sleeved the togs of the American workplace. They've made pinstripes obsolete. They've made ties as necessary as typewriters. And here in Baltimore, they've spoiled the Memorial Day de-mothballing of the poplin. Memorial Day weekend once delineated the shift to summer business attire.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
The 3-year-olds were jumping with excitement before the first sleigh bell jingled. Their eyes widened as Santa and Mrs. Claus entered their classroom yesterday at Carroll Child Care Centers Inc., a not-for-profit center in Westminster with more than 80 children ranging in age from 6 weeks to 10 years old. "They've known for a few weeks that Santa was coming today, so they've been planning for it," said JoAnn Goldberger, the center's executive director....
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
Robert N. Wildrick threaded his way through the sprawling headquarters plant of Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc., past tailors adjusting garments, operators taking catalog orders, warehouse workers preparing rack upon rack of perfectly creased, ready-to-ship pants.In his first week on the job as chief executive, he'd already weathered criticism for just stepping in -- mostly because the last retail chain he headed went out of business. He knew that sagging sales and stock prices clouded Bank's future.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1996
Continuing its moves away from beverages and Baltimore, Atlantic Beverage Co. said yesterday that it cemented a long-term employment deal with its Chicago-based CEO and planned to officially move its headquarters from Baltimore to Northbrook, a Chicago suburb.Atlantic has been unofficially based in the Chicago area since March, when it appointed Alan F. Sussna as chief executive and started buying up small processed meat companies in the South.Sussna, 39, lives in the Chicago area. He called the headquarters move "nothing more than a housekeeping address change" and said "there's really not going to be any impact on the beverage business in Baltimore."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 31, 1999
For years, actor Tim Grimm was typecast as "a guy in a suit -- either a slick, bumbling lawyer or an FBI or CIA agent," as he puts it. But in his most recent roles, he's turned his collar and joined the clergy. In Heather McDonald's "An Almost Holy Picture," which opens Wednesday at Center Stage, Grimm portrays an ex-Episcopal priest. And in the new CBS-TV cop series "Turks," he plays Father Tom, spiritual adviser to the wife of the show's star, William Devane."It's a pleasant change," says Grimm, 38, who spent six years in Hollywood playing roles ranging from one of Harrison Ford's FBI buddies in the movie "Clear and Present Danger" to Marlee Matlin's sleazy attorney ex- husband in the NBC-TV series "Reasonable Doubts."
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
Shortstop Alex Rodriguez won't be the first person to make a quarter billion dollars off Texas Rangers owner Tom Hicks. A bunch of other guys, led by a fellow named George W. Bush - yeah, that one - already took that amount from Hicks back in 1998, and all they had to do was give him their baseball team. It almost makes A-Rod's new contract - 10 seasons of work in the blazing Texas summer - seem a raw deal by comparison. Which only goes to show that even the most outrageously greedy deal in the history of professional sports ($252 million per decade!
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
The 3-year-olds were jumping with excitement before the first sleigh bell jingled. Their eyes widened as Santa and Mrs. Claus entered their classroom yesterday at Carroll Child Care Centers Inc., a not-for-profit center in Westminster with more than 80 children ranging in age from 6 weeks to 10 years old. "They've known for a few weeks that Santa was coming today, so they've been planning for it," said JoAnn Goldberger, the center's executive director....
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
Shortstop Alex Rodriguez won't be the first person to make a quarter billion dollars off Texas Rangers owner Tom Hicks. A bunch of other guys, led by a fellow named George W. Bush - yeah, that one - already took that amount from Hicks back in 1998, and all they had to do was give him their baseball team. It almost makes A-Rod's new contract - 10 seasons of work in the blazing Texas summer - seem a raw deal by comparison. Which only goes to show that even the most outrageously greedy deal in the history of professional sports ($252 million per decade!
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2000
Overlooked in the antitrust battle against the nation's software giant is this: Microsoft's complicity in the demise of the business suit. Microsoft - and its khakis-and-T-shirt cousins - have systematically untucked and short-sleeved the togs of the American workplace. They've made pinstripes obsolete. They've made ties as necessary as typewriters. And here in Baltimore, they've spoiled the Memorial Day de-mothballing of the poplin. Memorial Day weekend once delineated the shift to summer business attire.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
Robert N. Wildrick threaded his way through the sprawling headquarters plant of Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc., past tailors adjusting garments, operators taking catalog orders, warehouse workers preparing rack upon rack of perfectly creased, ready-to-ship pants.In his first week on the job as chief executive, he'd already weathered criticism for just stepping in -- mostly because the last retail chain he headed went out of business. He knew that sagging sales and stock prices clouded Bank's future.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 31, 1999
For years, actor Tim Grimm was typecast as "a guy in a suit -- either a slick, bumbling lawyer or an FBI or CIA agent," as he puts it. But in his most recent roles, he's turned his collar and joined the clergy. In Heather McDonald's "An Almost Holy Picture," which opens Wednesday at Center Stage, Grimm portrays an ex-Episcopal priest. And in the new CBS-TV cop series "Turks," he plays Father Tom, spiritual adviser to the wife of the show's star, William Devane."It's a pleasant change," says Grimm, 38, who spent six years in Hollywood playing roles ranging from one of Harrison Ford's FBI buddies in the movie "Clear and Present Danger" to Marlee Matlin's sleazy attorney ex- husband in the NBC-TV series "Reasonable Doubts."
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1996
Continuing its moves away from beverages and Baltimore, Atlantic Beverage Co. said yesterday that it cemented a long-term employment deal with its Chicago-based CEO and planned to officially move its headquarters from Baltimore to Northbrook, a Chicago suburb.Atlantic has been unofficially based in the Chicago area since March, when it appointed Alan F. Sussna as chief executive and started buying up small processed meat companies in the South.Sussna, 39, lives in the Chicago area. He called the headquarters move "nothing more than a housekeeping address change" and said "there's really not going to be any impact on the beverage business in Baltimore."
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2002
It was his big break. A former congressman gave Michael S. Steele, then a law student, a free ticket to the 1988 Prince George's County Republican Party Lincoln Day dinner. Steele, who had just moved from Washington to Largo, wanted to plunge into local partisan politics. "I got to the event, and I was all psyched to be there," said Steele, who was already a low-level volunteer for the national Republican Party. "I was thinking, `Wow. Maryland, they've got a state party, they have a county party.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2007
Men's Wearhouse Inc. Shares slumped $6.72, or 16 percent, to $34.33. The business-suit retailer whose chief executive doubles as its pitchman reported earnings yesterday that were less than analysts' estimates.
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