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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1999
A Baltimore County engineering firm found to be using unlicensed copies of software has agreed to contribute $135,000 to the Business Software Alliance, a lobbying group whose members include Microsoft Corp. and other software makers.The alliance said it will use the donation for its campaign to raise awareness of software piracy.Robert Kruger, president of the Washington-based Business Software Alliance, said the organization conducted an audit of software used by Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes , gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
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BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2002
A computer industry group that combats software piracy has a message for Baltimore-area businesses: Stop using illegal copies during the next month or we'll come after you. And to further its point, the alliance will announce tomorrow that two local businesses have paid $180,000 to settle claims over illegal software. Turf Valley Resort and Conference Center in Howard County paid $115,000 and e.magination, a Baltimore Internet company, paid $65,000 to the Business Software Alliance, a Washington organization created by software manufacturers to slow the bootleg use of their products.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes , gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | May 22, 1995
While piracy of computer programs declined in some Asian nations last year, the losses to producers rose because demand for software is mushrooming, an industry group says.Software theft in some countries in Asia reached their lowest levels since the launch of anti-piracy campaigns, according to estimates for 1994 by the Washington-based Business Software Alliance.Levels of piracy in Hong Kong and Taiwan fell last year, its annual report says. But the "rapid growth of the market in [Hong Kong]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
The e-mail ads couldn't be more enticing: Adobe Photoshop 7, the gold standard for professional image editing, regularly $609, now only $39.95. And Norton Systemworks 2002, a top utility package, for 90 percent off retail. There's only one problem: "If it looks too good to be true, then it is too good to be true," says Ray Campbell, senior corporate counsel for Adobe Systems. The offers come from software "pirates" who swashbuckle their way through swap meets, computer shows and the Internet, proffering fake or illegally copied programs that cost legitimate publishers $11 billion last year, according to the Business Software Alliance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Daniel Vasquez and Daniel Vasquez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 11, 2001
When police busted Anastacio Caneda in his San Jose home last year for duplicating CDs of expensive engineering and design computer programs and selling bootlegs on the Web, they also helped pioneer a new way to thwart software pirates - by going after the customers, too. In one of the first cases of its type - and according to the software industry, the largest and most successful - police and software company investigators tracked down dozens of...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - Federal agents carried out dozens of raids yesterday against a far-flung net work suspected of pirating billions of dollars worth of computer soft ware - ranging from operating systems to the latest music videos and movies - over the Internet. Agents seized computers and hard drives in at least 27 cities in 21 states in raids on businesses, university computer centers, Internet service providers and many residences. Foreign law enforcement people staged about 20 similar raids in Australia, Britain, Finland and Norway.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2002
A computer industry group that combats software piracy has a message for Baltimore-area businesses: Stop using illegal copies during the next month or we'll come after you. And to further its point, the alliance will announce tomorrow that two local businesses have paid $180,000 to settle claims over illegal software. Turf Valley Resort and Conference Center in Howard County paid $115,000 and e.magination, a Baltimore Internet company, paid $65,000 to the Business Software Alliance, a Washington organization created by software manufacturers to slow the bootleg use of their products.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
The e-mail ads couldn't be more enticing: Adobe Photoshop 7, the gold standard for professional image editing, regularly $609, now only $39.95. And Norton Systemworks 2002, a top utility package, for 90 percent off retail. There's only one problem: "If it looks too good to be true, then it is too good to be true," says Ray Campbell, senior corporate counsel for Adobe Systems. The offers come from software "pirates" who swashbuckle their way through swap meets, computer shows and the Internet, proffering fake or illegally copied programs that cost legitimate publishers $11 billion last year, according to the Business Software Alliance.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1999
A Baltimore County engineering firm found to be using unlicensed copies of software has agreed to contribute $135,000 to the Business Software Alliance, a lobbying group whose members include Microsoft Corp. and other software makers.The alliance said it will use the donation for its campaign to raise awareness of software piracy.Robert Kruger, president of the Washington-based Business Software Alliance, said the organization conducted an audit of software used by Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | May 22, 1995
While piracy of computer programs declined in some Asian nations last year, the losses to producers rose because demand for software is mushrooming, an industry group says.Software theft in some countries in Asia reached their lowest levels since the launch of anti-piracy campaigns, according to estimates for 1994 by the Washington-based Business Software Alliance.Levels of piracy in Hong Kong and Taiwan fell last year, its annual report says. But the "rapid growth of the market in [Hong Kong]
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1996
The computer software industry is turning up the heat on the Clinton administration in a bid to force liberal regulation of the export of computer encryption technology.The Business Software Alliance, a lobbying group for more than a dozen leading computer and software firms, claims that the administration is backing away from its commitment in October to liberalize the rules covering exports of strong cryptography."We seriously doubt the regulations will work, meet computer user demands, or be accepted by the private sector unless the administration radically changes its approach," BSA President Robert W. Holleyman II wrote to Vice President Al Gore this week.
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