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NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1998
A leading business group says Maryland schools need to spend $400 million for computer equipment and teacher training during the next four years to give students the high-tech skills they need for the 21st century.The good news is that significant funding has been going to school system technology accounts, according to the Maryland Business Roundtable for Education's updated technology plan.The Maryland State Board of Education yesterday endorsed the four-year plan, "State of Innovation: The Maryland Plan for Technology in Education, 1999-2003."
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
The chief technology officer of the Maryland Business Roundtable for Education has been tapped to head economic development efforts in Baltimore County, where leaders say they want to put more emphasis on workforce training. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Monday he has nominated Will Anderson to the post and will introduce legislation to rename the county's economic development department the Economic and Workforce Development Department. In 2011, the county merged its Office of Workforce Development into the Department of Economic Development, and officials said the name change would underscore its goals.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2001
Maryland high school students will soon be hearing about the importance of academics from a new group of adults: the religious community. The state's religious leaders are scheduled to announce this morning that they're joining the Maryland Business Roundtable for Education's "Achievement Counts" campaign. The program -- which in the past has relied on radio campaigns and classroom speakers -- will seek to encourage ministers, priests, pastors and rabbis to talk to students about the value of working hard in school.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun reporter | September 16, 2007
A pilot program launched in Harford County four years ago has resulted in gains in students taking more challenging high school courses than the required curriculum, county school officials say. The largest increases occurred among minority students and students from lower-income households, schools officials said, promoting the Maryland Scholars program during a visit by state leaders to Harford last week. The objective of the program, which was offered as a pilot program in Harford and Frederick counties in 2003, is to encourage students to complete more rigorous math and science courses to prepare them for college and careers.
BUSINESS
By Harry Milling and Harry Milling,Special to The Evening Sun | January 6, 1992
The Maryland Business Roundtable for Education, a group of CEOs of more than 50 Maryland companies, and state officials were meeting today to discuss ways the business community can help improve the state's public schools.Programs that arise out of today's discussions might include developing better teaching methods in the maths and sciences, and management training for school board administrators and principals, organizers of the initiative said.Gov. William Donald Schaefer and Nancy S. Grasmick, superintendent of the state Department of Education, have encouraged the partnership, which would operate under the auspices of Maryland Chamber of Commerce and Maryland Economic Growth Associates (MEGA)
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 31, 2005
WASHINGTON - Former Fannie Mae Chief Executive Officer Franklin D. Raines has been removed as co-chairman of an institute for corporate ethics that he helped create at the University of Virginia's Darden business school, an institute spokesman said yesterday. Raines and Pfizer Inc. CEO Hank McKinnell, acting on behalf of the Business Roundtable of CEOs, started the institute in January 2004, enlisting faculty members from business schools at Harvard, Northwestern, Michigan and five other universities to research and promote corporate ethics.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2003
Starting in the fall, Harford and Frederick school districts will offer students more challenging high school coursework that sets higher graduation standards for those who want to participate. Maryland is one of five states chosen to take part in the State Scholars Initiative, introduced last summer by President Bush and U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige. The initiative encourages high school students to enroll in an overall course of study that requires more science, social studies and foreign language classes than are typically required to graduate.
NEWS
October 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Maryland Business Roundtable for Education received the 1997 State Coalition of the Year Award yesterday for working to ensure that all the state's students receive a quality education.Presented by the National Alliance for Business at its annual meeting here, the award recognizes the roundtable's work with the Maryland State Department of Education in helping to set high standards for students, teachers and administrators and to communicate those standards.The roundtable is a coalition of more than 80 Maryland businesses working to reform public education.
NEWS
By Sarah Merkey and Sarah Merkey,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2004
Harford County schools will begin participating next month in the State Scholars Initiative, which brings the business community into the classroom to encourage students to take courses that are more challenging. Maryland began the program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education, in the fall in Frederick County. The initiative, a partnership between the school system and the Maryland Business Round- table for Education, tries to better prepare students for higher education and the workplace.
NEWS
August 31, 2000
ASK A GROUP of teen-agers what they want to do after high school, and, not surprisingly, some will say: live in a mansion, drive a Porsche. The surprise comes when you ask those kids what job's going to get them there, and they say ... McDonald's. What's needed here is a little Myth Moshing 101. But when parents and teachers try to break the real-world news, teens are like, "Whatever!" So the Maryland Business Roundtable for Education is giving kids a chance to hear the message from someone they're more likely to listen to. The group's Achievement Counts program puts young workers, ages 19 to 37 -- including teachers, firefighters, dot-com wizards and even a mayor -- into ninth-grade classrooms to talk about what really happens after graduation day. The volunteers lay out a few hard truths: how much it costs to keep a car, pay for an apartment, put food on the table and still have enough cash to catch a movie Friday night.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER | July 23, 2006
Orchestra seeks young musicians The Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra is seeking young musicians for its coming season. The CYSO has seven ensembles, including two all-strings orchestras, two full orchestras, a wind ensemble and two flute choirs. Musicians of any age and ability should call or e-mail to schedule an audition. Auditions will be held Aug. 29 to Sept. 1 between 5 to 9 p.m. and are by appointment only. Information: 410-263-2664, cy so@verizon.net or www.cy orchestra.org Volunteers wanted to share experience The Maryland Business Roundtable for Education needs volunteers from the Anne Arundel County business community to share their work experiences with area eighth- and ninth-graders and show them the connection between what they're learning in school and the real world.
NEWS
By KATIE WILMETH and KATIE WILMETH,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 25, 2005
A one-bedroom apartment in Maryland will run about $700 a month, the students were told - plus, there are car payments, entertainment expenses, and insurance and utility bills. "Ladies and gentlemen, I am telling you the truth. I am not lying, embellishing or exaggerating," said Magellan Westbrook, 35, ticking off living expenses to a classroom of ninth-graders at Milford Mill Academy this week. "These are true numbers, and I'm not done yet ... because we still have to eat." That's $400 more on the chalkboard list.
NEWS
June 26, 2005
Board of Education should OK reforms Very few people like change. Yet true leadership sometimes requires you to embrace change to meet challenges. That's what the high school reform proposals developed by Harford County Public School administrators are all about. The Board of Directors of the Harford Business Roundtable for Education (HBRT) has evaluated the reform proposals that the Board of Education will be considering next Monday. We support these proposals, and here's why: 1) Our students will be able to pursue their own life goals, while still being challenged to meet rigorous academic standards.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 31, 2005
WASHINGTON - Former Fannie Mae Chief Executive Officer Franklin D. Raines has been removed as co-chairman of an institute for corporate ethics that he helped create at the University of Virginia's Darden business school, an institute spokesman said yesterday. Raines and Pfizer Inc. CEO Hank McKinnell, acting on behalf of the Business Roundtable of CEOs, started the institute in January 2004, enlisting faculty members from business schools at Harvard, Northwestern, Michigan and five other universities to research and promote corporate ethics.
NEWS
By Sarah Merkey and Sarah Merkey,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2004
Harford County schools will begin participating next month in the State Scholars Initiative, which brings the business community into the classroom to encourage students to take courses that are more challenging. Maryland began the program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education, in the fall in Frederick County. The initiative, a partnership between the school system and the Maryland Business Round- table for Education, tries to better prepare students for higher education and the workplace.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Countryman and Andrew Countryman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 7, 2003
Federal regulators are poised to offer much-anticipated rules on shareholder-nominated candidates for corporate boards, but some investors say they fear the plan could impose too many impediments. The Securities and Exchange Commission is scheduled to meet tomorrow to debate a formal rule proposal to give shareholders access, in certain cases, to company proxy materials so they can put forward candidates to challenge management nominees for the board of directors. The SEC has debated several times over the years a way to modify the usual system of mere shareholder ratification of management candidates, but this is the furthest it has advanced.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic leadership of the House of Representatives is expected to make public tomorrow a substitute civil rights "package" containing a number of proposed amendments to the bill now before the House.The leadership's expectation is that while the substitute bill will be put before the House this week, it is unlikely to be debated or voted on until next week because of other congressional business.The substitute bill would replace H.R. 1, which has already gone through House committee procedures and stands ready for floor action.
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