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NEWS
March 17, 2011
Today's Baltimore Sun editorial ("Good money after bad," March 17) did a good job of recapping the ongoing nastiness about who gets slots and where the machines get installed. However, as a Maryland taxpayer and horseracing fan — both for over 40 years — I am baffled by the fact that The Sun has chosen at this late date to demand a "business plan" for the operation of Laurel and Pimlico. As if that would be a vital step in saving thoroughbred racing industry! The key to any attempt to save the industry is a substantial infusion of purse money.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
A family-owned produce distributor has moved from Washington to a new base in Jessup, where its 80 employees work to package and transport more than 1 million pounds of tomatoes each week. Pete Pappas & Sons Inc., founded in 1942 in Washington as a tomato distributor, started operations in August at its 120,000-square-foot warehouse in Jessup, said Paul S. Pappas, general manager for the firm, which is in its fourth generation of family ownership. The larger property will allow the firm to expand into new types of produce from its tomato and berries, he said.
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NEWS
By Marta H. Mossburg | March 30, 2010
R olling Stone writer Matt Taibbi famously described Goldman Sachs as a "great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money." His July article detailed how the history of the financial crisis reads like a "Who's Who" of the investment bank's graduates. If Taibbi were to make the same analogy of the 50 states, Maryland could compete for top honor. The latest figures show that total direct federal expenditures grew 73 percent in Maryland from 2000 to 2008 from $45 billion to $78 billion.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College student Ethan Dietrich plans to make his idea for a technology company a reality through his energy, adaptability and passion - and a little help from mentors and investors at the TechStars Patriot Boot Camp at Goldman Sachs in New York. Dietrich, 32, of Odenton, was one of 50 veterans or active-duty military nationwide invited last month to the three-day boot camp of entrepreneurial education, mentoring and relationship building. TechStars chose Dietrich based on the business plan he submitted for SixGen LLC, a company that combines "big data," cloud computing and cybersecurity aspects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
In hip-hop, momentum matters. After the success of 2012's "The Yellow Album," Los Angeles rapper Dom Kennedy knew he had captured more ears than ever before. But the 29-year-old born Dominic Hunn refused to consider his next album, last October's "Get Home Safely," his only shot at next-level stardom. "Everything is not dependent on this project or that project. It's all an evolution of growing as a person," Kennedy said on the phone from downtown Los Angeles last week. "My mindset going into 'Get Home Safely' was making a project that I could be happy with for the rest of my life and something that will test the time.
NEWS
By Lauren Rosenblum and Lauren Rosenblum,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2003
Corey Blanton, the new owner of Howard County's Bagel Bin restaurants, wants to be evolutionary - not revolutionary. He has extended the operating hours of the four stores - which now close at 9 p.m. instead of 5 p.m., and is adding items to the menu, including soft-serve ice cream. Blanton also changed the name, tacking on "and Deli." But, he said, "Bagel Bin and Deli" reflects more what the 21-year-old chain founded by Steve Girard already is, not what it will become. "I don't want to change the business because Steve had a great company," said Blanton, 35, who lives in Clarksville with his wife, Emma, and their six children.
BUSINESS
By J. Leffall and J. Leffall,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
Long before Tim Allen made it big with his hit show "Home Improvement," it was "Tool Time" in the Enger household.As soon as Kyle Enger was able to, he helped his father, an entrepreneur who ran a bank consulting business, tackle home improvement projects around his Seattle house.Years later, Enger has come up with an entrepreneurial venture of his own, and it's enough to make any do-it-yourselfer -- or father -- proud.Enger's plan for Superbuild.com, an online resource for the purchase of home improvement products, beat out 24 other entries to win the Chief Executive Officers Club of Baltimore's third annual business plan competition.
BUSINESS
By STEPHEN L. ROSENSTEIN | May 11, 2008
A business plan is an indispensable management and operating tool for using your time, capital and energy most effectively. The plan of action for building a successful small business examines the environment where you expect your business to operate, including potential problems, cyclical trends and growth opportunities. If you plan to seek financing, it is certain that a lender will require a business plan as part of the loan application. Putting your objectives in writing as you build a business plan also forces you to think realistically about sales, expenses and short- and long-term goals.
NEWS
November 29, 1999
Chamber to give awards at membership dinnerAnnapolis and Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce will hold its first Beacon Awards Membership Dinner on Thursdayat the Radisson Hotel in Annapolis.The event will begin with a reception at 5: 30 p.m. followed by dinner at 6: 30 p.m.The chamber will present awards including business leader, entrepreneur and minority business person of the year.Entertainment will be provided by comedian Roger Mursick.Cost is $50 per person. Information: 410-268-7676, Ext. 100.SCORE seminar teaches how to make business planA one-day seminar, "Let's Prepare a Business Plan," will be presented by Service Corps of Retired Executives Chapter 390 from 8: 45 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 7 in the first-floor training room of the Heritage Office Complex at 2660 Riva Road, Annapolis.
NEWS
October 30, 2008
Howard Tech Council to present awards Nov. 11 The Howard Technology Council, in partnership with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, will present the 2008 Technology Awards at an event scheduled from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 11 at APL's Kossiakoff Center, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, North Laurel. The awards program recognizes innovative companies and their contributions to the Howard County community and to the economy. The keynote speaker will be Aris Melissaratos, special adviser on enterprise development to the president of the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
At least one local business is planning to fly drones over Baltimore after a judge ruled that there is no law prohibiting the commercial use of small unmanned aircraft. Terry Kilby, who with his wife, Belinda, published a book last year of aerial photographs of the city taken by unmanned aircraft, said Friday that they would launch their "rent-a-drone" operation next week. "It's really a great day for all of us that are in this industry," he said. "We've seen lots of companies go bankrupt waiting for this to happen, and it's a nice relief now to see this.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
Susan Aplin worked behind the scenes for two decades helping run some of the biggest retail stores around - Williams-Sonoma, Sports Authority, Staples, The Gap, Banana Republic, Old Navy and Pottery Barn. But it wasn't until she and friend Carolyn Wapnick took a vacation to Alaska's Prince William Sound that she found her true calling: retail with a cause. As a result of the trip, the duo founded bambeco, an online seller of sustainable home furnishings. Since 2009, the Baltimore-based retailer has grown from two employees to nearly two dozen and attracted more than $4 million worth of investment.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | February 12, 2014
Alex. Brown Realty, Inc. a private real estate investment manager, has bought a five-acre site in Oregon with plans for a 140-room Marriott Residence Inn. ABR and its partners, Portland-based Hillsboro Hotel Development and Texas-based Huntington Hotel Group, are in the process of securing construction permits for the property, which is about 15 miles from Portland and next to a 7,000-employee Intel Corp. campus, the partners announced Tuesday. ABR Chesapeake Fund IV, a fund sponsored by ABR, expects to have spent $8 million once the Hillsboro hotel is complete, the company said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
In hip-hop, momentum matters. After the success of 2012's "The Yellow Album," Los Angeles rapper Dom Kennedy knew he had captured more ears than ever before. But the 29-year-old born Dominic Hunn refused to consider his next album, last October's "Get Home Safely," his only shot at next-level stardom. "Everything is not dependent on this project or that project. It's all an evolution of growing as a person," Kennedy said on the phone from downtown Los Angeles last week. "My mindset going into 'Get Home Safely' was making a project that I could be happy with for the rest of my life and something that will test the time.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
Letter writer Michael Saltsman is unequivocally wrong when he states that raising the minimum wage kills jobs (" Job-killer, thy name is minimum wage," Sept. 16). He opines that the editorial page of The Sun is wrong in cherry picking dates to prove their point and yet conveniently picks a date from 20 years ago to prove his. And should a number arbitrarily chosen in 1938 have any more relevance than a footnote today? When wages are too low, people simply elect not to work. They may become part of the underground economy, pursue unsavory endeavors and engage in activities that some find morally objectionable.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Recession being the bane of piano retailers, it seems wholly remarkable that Harry Cohen and his son, Lou, decided to start selling Baldwins and Wurlitzers in 1937 - the year the economy relapsed toward the end of the Great Depression. But somehow the Cohens survived the recession of 1937 and 1938. In fact, the family business, founded in Philadelphia, thrived through three generations and extended into three states. Hundreds of families in Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland bought new and used pianos from one of the Cohens over the years.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1995
At least three small new Baltimore-area firms will get a few thousand dollars each this year to help them get into business lines that serve the needs of minorities, women and local communities, AT&T Capital Corp. and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants are to announce tomorrow.The grants will be available under Partners for Growth, a program sponsored by the telephone company's lending arm and the national association of accountants, which is making Baltimore one of two U.S. cities where community-oriented start-ups will receive grants.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
Inside the former Barclay Recreation Center on Saturday, the smell of fumes filled the air as a band of volunteers spent the morning putting on a fresh coat of paint in anticipation of its reopening under new management later this year. The city's Department of Recreation and Parks shut down the center last August after 32 years and handed it over to the neighboring Barclay Elementary and Middle School. Volunteers from the area finally started working earlier this year to get the facility back up and running.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
Let's set one thing straight right away: St. Patrick's Day stereotypes to the contrary, there's nothing green about an Irish breakfast. "No, nothing will be green," pledges Chris Marquis, chef at Baltimore's Slainte Irish Pub and Restaurant, before pausing for a moment and realizing a stray vegetable might possibly find its way onto the plate. "Nothing will be artificially green, let me correct that," he says. But green may very well be the only thing not showing up on the breakfast plates being served up by Irish eateries all over the area this weekend.
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