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By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1997
Anne Arundel County Councilman Thomas W. Redmond Sr. owes $11,817 in delinquent county business property taxes on his Pasadena auto parts and towing business, county officials confirmed yesterday.The revelation of the county tax debt on Redmond's Inc., a family-run car salvage business at 8226 Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd. that grosses $1.4 million a year, is the most recent bad financial news for the 50-year-old Democrat.Last week, a business partner sued the first-term county councilman from Pasadena for allegedly failing to meet a repayment schedule on a $25,000 personal loan.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Frederick J. "Jack" Beste, a retired businessman and World War II veteran, died Wednesday at Lorien Mays Chapel of complications from pneumonia. He was 88. The son of Frederick J. Beste Sr., a cemetery director, and Evelyn Bevans Beste, a homemaker, Frederick John Beste was born in Baltimore and raised on Rosalie Avenue in Hamilton. He graduated in 1943 from Polytechnic Institute and enlisted in the Army Air Forces, where he was a radar and mathematics instructor. After being discharged in 1947, he went to work as an instructor for the New York Technical Institute of Maryland and later became its director.
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SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2000
Ray Lewis' Atlanta-based defense attorney is a well-regarded trial lawyer known for defending his clients' reputations through the media and winning over juries with a likable, low-key manner. Edward T.M. Garland, 58, is also a business partner of home run king Hank Aaron, who referred the Ravens to Garland, according to sources familiar with the case. Fellow attorneys say it was a good recommendation. "Ed has tremendous trial skills. He has a wonderful way of communicating with both judges and jurors," said Wilmer "Buddy" Parker III, a defense attorney who, when serving as a federal prosecutor, faced off against Garland.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
Twice this year, the city has awarded no-bid energy consulting contracts to a Baltimore company recommended by the head of the city's energy office, who was once listed as a "special partner" in the firm. Bovaro Partners LLC has received renewable-energy analysis jobs for $25,000 and $49,000. Its website lists city energy director Theodore "Ted" Atwood as a "special partner" in the financial firm. In an interview, Atwood said that the site is outdated and that he was surprised to learn he was ever listed on it. Before he worked for the city, Atwood said, he partnered with the firm on a 2004 project that was ultimately unsuccessful.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
A disbarred Towson lawyer pleaded guilty in federal court yesterday to his role in a fraudulent property flipping scheme while a former business partner described his own flipping activities in another courtroom. Angus E. Finney, who was disbarred in 1997, pleaded guilty to one count in a 17-count indictment, admitting that his illegal activities cost lenders who financed the flips between $350,000 and $500,000. Finney was the ninth person convicted in recent months of defrauding mortgage lenders in property flips, where houses were bought and quickly resold at inflated values for a substantial profit, using falsified documents.
NEWS
By Fred Schulte and Fred Schulte,Sun reporter | July 5, 2008
Paul W. Nochumowitz, who has been one of Baltimore's biggest ground rent owners, has agreed to a $1.53 million settlement of a lawsuit that accused him of living lavishly from ground-rent income while claiming he was too poor to compensate former tenants harmed by exposure to lead paint. The settlement ends a contentious court fight between Nochumowitz and bankruptcy trustee George Liebmann, who accused the ground rent owner in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore of concealing his wealth to escape liability for lead paint injuries in rental housing he owned.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2004
The owners of Rosecroft Raceway said yesterday that they have settled a debt with a former business partner - clearing the way for the sale of the harness track to the family of Baltimore trial lawyer Peter G. Angelos. The track, located just off the Capital Beltway in Prince George's County, has been eyed as a potential site for a lucrative slot machine gambling license if the General Assembly decides to allow slots in Maryland. Rosecroft's former business partner, Northwind Racing LLC, was holding a mortgage on the track, which has struggled financially in recent years.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | October 31, 1991
If Yogi Berra were a TV critic, he would say ABC's "False Arrest" is deja vu all over again.It was just last Tuesday that we saw a blond-haired former series star tormented by a variety of darker-complexioned inmates while serving an unjust prison term. Sunday night you get to see it again.In the first one, it was Cheryl Ladd, framed on a drug rap in CBS' "Locked Up: A Mother's Rage" that eventually became a polemic on incarceration causing the sins of the mother to be visited upon her kids.
BUSINESS
By Ameet Sachdev and Ameet Sachdev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 18, 2007
CHICAGO -- A federal judge sentenced former Chicago Sun-Times publisher F. David Radler to 29 months in prison yesterday for taking millions of dollars in unauthorized payments from the tabloid's parent company. He must surrender to authorities Feb. 25. U.S. District Judge Amy J. St. Eve accepted the plea agreement between Radler and federal prosecutors that gave him a reduced sentence in exchange for pleading guilty and cooperating with government's investigation of a fraud scheme at Hollinger International Inc. He was also fined $250,000.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | July 16, 2008
GREENBELT - Jurors who are to decide the fate of former Prince George's County schools chief Andre J. Hornsby were virtually bombarded yesterday with facts, figures and entreaties by attorneys for the prosecution and the defense during closing arguments in the four-week-long corruption trial. Describing each of the 22 counts against Hornsby in federal court, Assistant U.S. Attorney Stuart A. Berman said that Hornsby "defrauded the school system of his honest services" when he tried to enrich himself through surreptitious deals with a longtime business partner and with a saleswoman for an educational materials company who was his live-in girlfriend.
TRAVEL
By Laren Hughes, For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Go big or go home.  That's the mindset of Dewey Beach businessman Alex Pires and his business partner, John Snow. As the Fourth of July approaches, the duo is busy setting the stage for a huge fireworks display - one so large it just might set a world record.  The goal is to see how many fireworks can be set off in a 10-minute period.  Zambelli Fireworks, the company that produces Rehoboth's show and 6,000 others throughout the year, will...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Adam D. Cockey Jr., a leader in the Baltimore-area real estate industry who had headed a Roland Park brokerage, died Oct. 30 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson of complications from a fall he suffered last month while on vacation in Phoenix, Ariz. He was 71 and had homes in Cockeysviile and St. Michaels. Born in Timonium, he was a member of the family that lent its name to Cockeysville. He attended Lutherville Elementary School. He was a 1959 graduate of Towson High School, where he was class president.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2011
Joan C. Moag, a family matriarch who started a successful home wallpapering business on a whim, died of complications of cancer and Alzheimer's disease Monday at the Blakehurst Retirement Community. She was 78 and had lived in Tuscany-Canterbury. Born Joan Swanson in Chicago, she attended Aquinas High School and Loyola University of Chicago. She married John Andrew Moag, a neighbor who lived on the same block, in 1953. They spent their honeymoon in Paris and lived for a year in Heidelberg, Germany, where he was stationed with the Army.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2010
Holding a little wooden toy and a pair of computer discs that she had salvaged from her desk, Denise Miller Martin was sobbing, her face lined with tears. "Your office is gone, Donna - it's burned out," she kept telling Donna Crivello, owner of the Mount Vernon restaurant that bears her given name, now closed in the aftermath of Tuesday's fire. Martin's revelation came Wednesday after she had inspected the devastated second floor of 800 N. Charles St., which housed both the law firm in which she worked and the offices Crivello shared with her business partner.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2010
Nate Foster stares across the Westminster airfield, a yellow pencil tucked behind his ear and a notepad covered in hand-scrawled flight coordinates under his arm. He just received his pilot's license on Thursday, but the Reisterstown teenager has already turned his sights to distant horizons. While fellow seniors from Friends School squeeze in last afternoons at the beach before classes start Sept. 1, Foster will be flying to California by himself in a cramped, two-seat airplane.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2008
Two years ago, Marilyn Wilhelm of Annapolis faced a difficult decision. Her husband had lost his job, and the family of six couldn't make it on the single income of a school day-care worker. Her sister suggested she look into a computer networking career, so she enrolled in the Cisco Networking Academy at Anne Arundel Community College. After two semesters of working part time and living off savings, Wilhelm became a Cisco-certified network associate. The entry-level certification ensures technicians know how to connect and manage the wiring and switches to link computers and provide Internet access.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2003
On his wedding day, the in-the-buff groom is expected to meet his partner - but not his new business partner, whom he mistakes for the masseuse he summoned for a pre-wedding massage. Bernard Slade's Romantic Comedy has cynical, successful Manhattan playwright Jason Carmichael assume that budding writer Phoebe Craddock has arrived at his apartment to administer his massage. Although she finds Jason a bit strange, Phoebe soon accepts an invitation to his wedding and his offer of a writing partnership.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
A disbarred Towson lawyer pleaded guilty in federal court yesterday to his role in a fraudulent property flipping scheme while a former business partner described his own flipping activities in another courtroom. Angus E. Finney, who was disbarred in 1997, pleaded guilty to one count in a 17-count indictment, admitting that his illegal activities cost lenders who financed the flips between $350,000 and $500,000. Finney was the ninth person convicted in recent months of defrauding mortgage lenders in property flips, where houses were bought and quickly resold at inflated values for a substantial profit, using falsified documents.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | July 16, 2008
GREENBELT - Jurors who are to decide the fate of former Prince George's County schools chief Andre J. Hornsby were virtually bombarded yesterday with facts, figures and entreaties by attorneys for the prosecution and the defense during closing arguments in the four-week-long corruption trial. Describing each of the 22 counts against Hornsby in federal court, Assistant U.S. Attorney Stuart A. Berman said that Hornsby "defrauded the school system of his honest services" when he tried to enrich himself through surreptitious deals with a longtime business partner and with a saleswoman for an educational materials company who was his live-in girlfriend.
NEWS
By Fred Schulte and Fred Schulte,Sun reporter | July 5, 2008
Paul W. Nochumowitz, who has been one of Baltimore's biggest ground rent owners, has agreed to a $1.53 million settlement of a lawsuit that accused him of living lavishly from ground-rent income while claiming he was too poor to compensate former tenants harmed by exposure to lead paint. The settlement ends a contentious court fight between Nochumowitz and bankruptcy trustee George Liebmann, who accused the ground rent owner in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore of concealing his wealth to escape liability for lead paint injuries in rental housing he owned.
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