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BUSINESS
May 18, 1992
The World Trade Center Institute and the Mid-Atlantic Council of International Organizations will present a series of seminars on world trade May 18-22. Here is a summary of the events. For complete registration, location and cost information, contact the Baltimore-based institute at 576-0022.Today: Europe8:30 a.m. -- Doing Business in EuropeNoon -- Luncheon1 p.m. -- European Integration -- 1992: How Can U.S. Firms Meet the Challenge?6 p.m. -- Gala dinnerTomorrow: International Business11 a.m. -- Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce Business-To-Business Trade ShowNoon -- International trade luncheon5:30 p.m. -- International business reception aboard Pride of Baltimore IIWednesday: Maryland and the Global Economy9 a.m. -- International trade seminar: Air and Freight Documentation, Title Transfer and Insurance10 a.m. -- Embassy Day (Continues until 10 p.m.)
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Racial disparities in the restaurant labor force of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport are hurting African-American employees and contributing to poverty in Baltimore, according to a study released Monday by the national labor organization Unite Here. Officials with AirMall USA, which subcontracts concessions operations at the airport for the Maryland Aviation Administration, rebutted the findings. The study, which Unite Here produced in collaboration with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, found African-American employees disproportionately work in low-wage positions at fast-food chains and in the back of airport restaurants as dishwashers and cooks, while white employees tend to fill higher-paying, front-of-house jobs as bartenders and servers.
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NEWS
April 14, 1991
Mike Fish, Small Business Development Center counselor, is availableTuesday afternoons to consult on business opportunities with CarrollCounty businesses.Fish opened the counseling center at the Winchester Building in March."Business has been wonderful in Carroll County," Fish said. "I have consulted with nearly 20 people since my first month."County business consultations have ranged from people wanting to open a restaurant to auto repair shops and furniture manufacturing."We help people write business plans, put financing packages together, even go along with them to a bank," Fish said.
NEWS
March 22, 2014
Donald Fry, president and CEO of the Greater Baltimore Committee, recently wrote that the Baltimore City Council's attempt to pass "Ban the Box" was misguided ( "'Ban the Box' law is wrong approach," March 19). "Ban the Box" is a national movement to introduce common-sense policies regarding the use of criminal records on employment applications. Since Mr. Fry's organization is primarily supported by business, it is understandable that he would write such a one-sided letter supporting the short-sighted views of a minority of the Maryland community.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1991
Good receptionOften your company's success depends on how you represent it at business receptions. Some tips for making your time most productive:* Come prepared. Sounds simple, yet many business people arrive without business cards.Be vigilant for business opportunities. Rather than saying a lot about what you do, listen to what others are saying and to needs they might be expressing.* Prepare your introduction. Adjust your clothing before you get to center stage. What you do unconsciously, everyone sees.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Racial disparities in the restaurant labor force of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport are hurting African-American employees and contributing to poverty in Baltimore, according to a study released Monday by the national labor organization Unite Here. Officials with AirMall USA, which subcontracts concessions operations at the airport for the Maryland Aviation Administration, rebutted the findings. The study, which Unite Here produced in collaboration with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, found African-American employees disproportionately work in low-wage positions at fast-food chains and in the back of airport restaurants as dishwashers and cooks, while white employees tend to fill higher-paying, front-of-house jobs as bartenders and servers.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 20, 1992
BOSTON -- Architects and construction companies in many regions of the country are showing signs of recovering from the recession, according to a national survey of design executives holding their annual convention here this weekend.Slightly more than half of the architects polled said they thought therecession had "bottomed out" as it relates to their firms, the survey by American Institute of Architects found.In addition, 44 percent of the 300 survey participants said business opportunities for design firms in their region had increased since Jan. 1. Thirty-one percent said opportunities remained the same, and 25 percent said opportunities had decreased.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
Angry communists screamed obscenities and shouted "Yankee go home." Someone even hit him over the head with a stick. But Jeff Collins returned from Russia early this week more enthusiastic than ever about business opportunities there."
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 7, 1999
Local entrepreneurs and interested individuals will be encouraged to keep Africa in mind when they consider trade and investment opportunities at a Saturdaytown meeting at Howard Community College in Columbia.The event, organized by the Constituency for Africa and the Institute of African Commerce and Culture, will introduce participants to business opportunities in Africa and discuss how to pursue them, said Melvin Foote, the constituency's executive director.Those who attend will learn how to improve the political environment for investment in Africa through contact with the U.S. and local governments, how to meet and communicate with contacts in Africa, and how to make use of federal agencies that have programs there.
NEWS
March 25, 2002
County launching effort to recognize, retain businesses Howard County Executive James N. Robey will launch the county's annual goodwill mission to the business community at 8 a.m. today at the Executive Conference Room in the Gateway Building, 6751 Columbia Gateway Drive, Columbia. This week, designated Business Appreciation Week, teams of representatives from the Economic Development Authority, county government, state Department of Business and Economic Development, the county's Chamber of Commerce, Howard Community College and other economic development partners will visit about 100 businesses in the county.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
After 25 Preaknesses, Annette Thomas has her routine, and recipes, down pat. Thirty pounds of ribs, both pork and beef, marinated overnight in vinegar and soy sauce, then grilled in front of her house on Saturday. Fifty pounds of red-skin potatoes — "Never russets, oh no, no, no!" — boiled in her crab pots for dill whipped potato salad. "Half-and-half," or homemade sweet tea — not the bought tea, she explains — and lemonade to wash it down. For the hungry hordes heading into or out of Pimlico Race Course , sidewalk chefs like Thomas serve up a home-cooked alternative to the concessions inside.
EXPLORE
Special to The Aegis | December 11, 2012
Concerns about cutbacks in defense spending notwithstanding, there are plenty of business opportunities on the horizon connected to activities at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Last week, more than 1,100 business and economic development representatives from across the country attended the proving ground's first installation-wide Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry, where APG commands presented more than 180 potential contracts worth an estimated $19.5 billion over the next five years.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
Kirk-Habicht Co. in Essex doesn't do much business in Europe, but problems on the continent are buffeting the manufacturer all the same. Its employees rely on a heavy wire to make springs tough enough for trucks, and the only plant they know of that makes what they need is in Germany - or was. The factory shut down. Company president Mark Habicht is struggling to find an alternative. "What's going on there is definitely affecting us," he said of events in Europe. "It's causing us to scramble and search the far corners of the world to see if there's anyone who can make this material for us. " As world economies knit ever closer together, the debt woes and economic slowdown in Europe are sending ripples across the Atlantic - giving pause to Maryland companies anxious about recessionary contagion and offering business opportunities to others.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2011
Former Baltimorean Greg Wise, who moved to York eight years ago to be closer to his aging parents, says he can easily identify new Maryland transplants who have joined him in the northern migration just across the Pennsylvania line. They're called "white-taggers," he said, because they have yet to change over to Pennsylvania license plates. He estimates that about one-fourth of those commuting south on Interstate 83 with him every morning still have Maryland tags. Long considered a Baltimore exurb, York County has seen its population swell 14 percent since 2000.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN REPORTER | May 25, 2007
Maryland Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari said yesterday that he has revamped the leadership of the Minority Business Enterprise Program to bring it "more accountability and transparency" after complaints and a recent audit highlighted troubles with the state office. Porcari had determined that some companies might have been improperly certified for the program that aims to bolster companies run by women and minorities. He has said that one company was approved through a "cynical manipulation" of the process.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Allison Connolly and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Allison Connolly,Sun reporters | September 10, 2006
A video game firm. A maker of collapsible tents. A provider of office space. Who would have thought, five years ago, that this hodgepodge of Maryland companies would be doing significant business in homeland security? The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, changed not only the country but corporate America as well - particularly companies with offices near Washington. Maryland, always a big beneficiary of U.S. taxpayer money, has seen federal spending on goods and services soar. Federal contracting dollars in the state nearly doubled from fiscal 2001 to fiscal 2004, the most recent year for which Census Bureau figures are available.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN REPORTER | May 25, 2007
Maryland Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari said yesterday that he has revamped the leadership of the Minority Business Enterprise Program to bring it "more accountability and transparency" after complaints and a recent audit highlighted troubles with the state office. Porcari had determined that some companies might have been improperly certified for the program that aims to bolster companies run by women and minorities. He has said that one company was approved through a "cynical manipulation" of the process.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | September 3, 2006
When the U.S. government banned most liquids and gels on board airplanes three weeks ago, the Clearwater Lobster Shop feared that its live crustacean business might be cooked. Three-quarters of the $1 million in annual sales at the Halifax International Airport store come from the critters boxed with gel packs that keep them cool in flight. Staff biologists and retail workers brainstormed to come up with a solid alternative: frozen vegetables. A weekend of testing proved that peas, carrots and corn stay just as cold.
NEWS
March 25, 2002
County launching effort to recognize, retain businesses Howard County Executive James N. Robey will launch the county's annual goodwill mission to the business community at 8 a.m. today at the Executive Conference Room in the Gateway Building, 6751 Columbia Gateway Drive, Columbia. This week, designated Business Appreciation Week, teams of representatives from the Economic Development Authority, county government, state Department of Business and Economic Development, the county's Chamber of Commerce, Howard Community College and other economic development partners will visit about 100 businesses in the county.
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