Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBusiness Leaders
IN THE NEWS

Business Leaders

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 3, 2012
Many successful people of today are absolutely convinced that the "virtuousness" of successful entrepreneurs and business people doing what they do creates opportunities for the benefit of all in our society. I truly don't doubt that. That is exactly how Rockefeller and Roosevelt and Kennedy and Buffett and on and on felt. These people were as capitalistic as they come. What those people had and what is missing from many today who champion this "virtuousness" is two other principles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 25, 2014
A few weeks ago I was visited in my office by the chairman of one of the country's biggest high-tech firms. He wanted to talk about the causes and consequences of widening inequality and the shrinking middle class, and what to do about it. I asked him why he was concerned. "Because the American middle class is the core of our customer base," he said. "If they can't afford our products in the years ahead, we're in deep trouble. " I'm hearing the same refrain these days from a growing number of business leaders.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
With momentum building for higher hourly pay in Maryland, Rep. John Delaney, a co-sponsor of a federal minimum wage bill and a former CEO, urged Baltimore-area business leaders Thursday to have a voice in a measure he said is long overdue. The business community's involvement in crafting a law will be key in limiting damage to businesses while lifting the standard of living for low-wage workers, the Maryland Democrat said during a round table discussion led by the Greater Baltimore Committee.
NEWS
By Larry Hogan | April 11, 2014
Few things surprise me anymore, especially when it comes to our leaders in Annapolis. Still, the brazenness demonstrated this legislative session by politicians seeking to recast themselves as "pro-business" after years of supporting anti-business policies is downright amazing. It started back in January, which Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch unveiled their "Joint Legislative Business and Economic Development Agenda" for the 2014 session of the Maryland General Assembly.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 25, 2014
A few weeks ago I was visited in my office by the chairman of one of the country's biggest high-tech firms. He wanted to talk about the causes and consequences of widening inequality and the shrinking middle class, and what to do about it. I asked him why he was concerned. "Because the American middle class is the core of our customer base," he said. "If they can't afford our products in the years ahead, we're in deep trouble. " I'm hearing the same refrain these days from a growing number of business leaders.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
As their bus rumbled through housing projects and dilapidated schools and toward Harbor East — one of the crown jewels of Baltimore's revitalized waterfront — Zion Baptist Church Pastor Marshall Prentice asked his parishioners how they felt after hearing about the millions of tax breaks given to developers there. "I'm a teacher, and I'm really upset," said Linda Jones, 62, recalling the three-inch cockroaches that scurried through her school and the library that was shut down due to budget cuts.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
For more than two decades, Chris Warner's business has taken him into a death zone 26,240 feet above sea level, where oxygen is thin, the weather is cruel and a single stumble can be fatal. A certified alpine guide, Warner has led nearly 200 international mountaineering expeditions. He is one of only nine U.S. climbers to reach the summits of Mount Everest and K2, the world's two highest peaks. Warner, 48, is the founder and owner of three Earth Treks climbing centers in Maryland, the co-author of two business books, and a teacher of leadership skills at universities and numerous corporations.
NEWS
By TRICIA BISHOP AND ANDREA K. WALKER and TRICIA BISHOP AND ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTERS | July 20, 2006
While business leaders hailed a federal court opinion striking down the so-called Wal-Mart law yesterday, they said Maryland's commercial reputation already has been damaged by the legislation. "The harm that gets done by proposing, passing and overruling a veto [of the bill] is much longer lasting than a sweet victory in court," said Aris Melissaratos, the secretary of the state's Department of Business and Economic Development. During recent sessions, the Maryland General Assembly has passed legislation that gives tax breaks and other incentives to startup companies and investors.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
After a decade of mounting alienation between the state and its business community, Gov.-elect Parris N. Glendening will ask senior business executives to take the lead in reshaping the state's drive to develop and attract jobs.He and top legislative leaders also plan to cut selected business taxes and start trimming the nation's highest real estate closing costs in this legislative session.They also promise to begin work this year toward broader tax and regulatory reform, although enactment of those would not occur until next year and later into their four-year term.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Kim Clark and Ian Johnson and Kim Clark,Staff Writers Staff Writer Jon Morgan, Mark Hyman and Ted Shelsby contributed to this article | August 11, 1993
From the worlds of banking and publishing to crab cooking and trucking, Maryland business leaders are trying to figure out what President Clinton's new budget package means to them and their companies.The plan, signed into law yesterday, was designed to slow the growth of the federal debt by $496 billion over the next five years. The bill's narrow passage was considered a crucial test of the new administration.But many of the 19 chief executives surveyed by The Sun criticized the plan, saying its higher taxes could stifle the economic recovery and slow their companies' planned expansions.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Antonio Harrell signed up to design and build competition robots at Dunbar High School because, he says, he "didn't have anything else to do. " Three years later, the 18-year-old senior has gotten so good at engineering robots, he's teaching Baltimore's business leaders how to use them. "He did a great job. Well, he did better than I expected he would do," Harrell said Sunday after Eliot Pearson, AOL's principal software engineer, finished operating a robot Harrell and two other Dunbar students built.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
The "pro-business" agenda outlined by our legislative leaders brings to mind what psychologists call the "Eddie Haskell syndrome" ( "A plan for building Maryland's economy," March 24). Named after the "Leave it to Beaver" character, this syndrome refers to the two different facets of our personalities - the person we are behind closed doors and the person we wish the public to think we are. The analogy fits Maryland's legislative leaders, who govern one way in Annapolis but pretend to have governed another way when they seek re-election.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
With momentum building for higher hourly pay in Maryland, Rep. John Delaney, a co-sponsor of a federal minimum wage bill and a former CEO, urged Baltimore-area business leaders Thursday to have a voice in a measure he said is long overdue. The business community's involvement in crafting a law will be key in limiting damage to businesses while lifting the standard of living for low-wage workers, the Maryland Democrat said during a round table discussion led by the Greater Baltimore Committee.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Only two words come to mind in response to the latest missive from the Greater Baltimore Committee wherein 52 CEOs say Maryland's highest priority for economic growth and job creation ought to be reforming the state's tax structure to make it more competitive: Good idea. That the region's business leaders think the state's tax structure is hurting the "business climate" is none too shocking. We have yet to visit the state where business leaders never grouse about taxes and the vicissitudes of government — state, federal and local.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The Greater Baltimore Committee said Wednesday that it will organize a private-sector commission to study Maryland's tax structure after dozens of local CEOs named tax reform the top priority for making the state more business friendly. The GBC, a business and civic leadership organization, said it surveyed more than 250 chief executives and conducted workshops across the region to hear business leaders' thoughts on how to increase Maryland's economic competitiveness. "Tax structure was the No. 1 - that's the one they consistently hear about, talk about, hear from others outside this state," said Donald C. Fry, the GBC's president.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke plans to step down when his term expires at the end of January - if not sooner - and President Barack Obama is expected to nominate a successor this fall. Right now, the front-runners appear to be former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers, an economic adviser to the president during his first term; and Fed Vice Chair Janet Yellen, No. 2 at the Fed but without close ties to the president. Some dark horses have emerged. Obama, for example, floated the name of Donald Kohn, Yellen's predecessor at the Fed before his retirement in 2010.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
It is not every day that a state senator objects to a business in his district receiving a state-subsidized loan to renovate or revitalize a building. Sen. James Brochin's opposition to a proposed $240,000 loan to The Greene Turtle in Towson rests on one principle - that government shouldn't be in the business of subsidizing business. "There are many other businesses in my district that are expanding and hiring people that are as worthy as Greene Turtle ," Mr. Brochin wrote in an Aug. 14 letter to two of the three members of the Board of Public Works.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Zuly Gonzalez and Beau Adkins used to work at the National Security Agency. Now they run a cybersecurity firm in Catonsville, helping companies defend against online threats. They're the embodiment of why Maryland officials call the state the nation's "epicenter" of cybersecurity: big federal installations here that focus on cyber problems, and all the private-sector growth related to it. It's no surprise then that much of the activity revolves around the government. But some groups and firms are trying to push the state's cybersecurity boundaries to grab more of the commercial market at a time of tighter federal budgets.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.