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NEWS
November 18, 2002
Trademarks seminar set for tomorrow The Howard County Economic Development Authority's Center for Business and Technology Development will offer a new seminar in its entrepreneurial series: "Register a Trade or Service Mark for Your Business." Attorney Daryl Caplan will explain how to protect a business name and logo to prevent costly consequences. The workshop will be held from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow at the Center for Business and Technology Development, 9250 Bendix Road North, Columbia.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2010
A person posing as a food inspector unsuccessfully tried to get a Howard County restaurant operator release sensitive information over the weekend, the latest instance in a series of similar incidents around the country in recent months, county health officials said. Saturday, the restaurant operator got a call from someone posing as a county health inspector who said the Health Department wanted to schedule an emergency food inspection at a specific date and time. The restaurateur was asked for detailed personal and business information, and when she questioned that, was given a telephone number to call to get a special code number and was then told to call back.
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BUSINESS
August 4, 1993
Business failures down nearly 10%A reviving U.S. economy is the reason why the number of U.S. business failures fell nearly 10 percent in the first half of this year, according to Dun & Bradstreet Corp. This comes after a record number of businesses failed in the United States last year. However, the rate of increase in failures peaked during 1992, and the fourth quarter saw a decline.For the first six months of 1993, business failures were down in all major industries and nearly every U.S. Census region because of the recovery, the business information company reported.
NEWS
November 18, 2002
Trademarks seminar set for tomorrow The Howard County Economic Development Authority's Center for Business and Technology Development will offer a new seminar in its entrepreneurial series: "Register a Trade or Service Mark for Your Business." Attorney Daryl Caplan will explain how to protect a business name and logo to prevent costly consequences. The workshop will be held from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow at the Center for Business and Technology Development, 9250 Bendix Road North, Columbia.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2010
A person posing as a food inspector unsuccessfully tried to get a Howard County restaurant operator release sensitive information over the weekend, the latest instance in a series of similar incidents around the country in recent months, county health officials said. Saturday, the restaurant operator got a call from someone posing as a county health inspector who said the Health Department wanted to schedule an emergency food inspection at a specific date and time. The restaurateur was asked for detailed personal and business information, and when she questioned that, was given a telephone number to call to get a special code number and was then told to call back.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | April 21, 1991
The last time W. Stephen Pindell of Dayton remembered being in a public library was during his college days in the late 1960s.But when Pindell, 46, lost his executive banking job of 7 1/2 years in February, it was the county library he turned to for help in preparing forhis job interviews."
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1996
In what it hopes to establish as an annual event, the Baltimore County Health Department held a forum yesterday to discuss public health issues with members of the business community.The program at the Towson Sheraton, "Good Public Health Is Good Business," was planned to coincide with National Public Health Week.The program included speeches by health professionals aimed at providing public health policy information for businesses.Dozens of representatives from local agencies and companies attended the meeting.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2000
RWD Technologies Inc., recovering from business it lost as companies spent their information-technology budgets on preventing the Y2K bug, reported yesterday that its first-quarter profit dropped 86 percent to $539,500, or 4 cents a share. Revenue for the three months that ended March 31 was $30.8 million, down 7 percent. "They were slightly above our revised expectations," said William Loomis, an analyst at Legg Mason Wood Walker in Baltimore, who had expected $30 million in revenue and earnings per share of 3 cents.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
Seniors provide a growing market, and the Anne Arundel Trade Council is giving local businesses an opportunity to tap into it at the third annual 55+ Expo next week in Glen Burnie, organizers say.The expo, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 18 at La Fontaine Bleu on Ritchie Highway, will include representatives from banks offering advice on estate planning and travel agents talking about getaways, said Jeanette Wessel, chief operating officer of the Anne Arundel...
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | June 5, 1991
A consultant to the company that supplies waste materials for LehighPortland Cement Co. to burn in its kilns was convicted eight years ago of conspiring to dump chemical waste in a New Jersey landfill.Residents opposed to Lehigh's plan to burn carbon waste found the information about the supplier's former chairman and chief executive officer during a computer search of newspaper stories and have given it to the Maryland Department of the Environment.Residents say they hope the information will persuade the state to deny Lehigh a permit to burn carbon waste, a non-hazardous waste, as an alternative fuel.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2000
RWD Technologies Inc., recovering from business it lost as companies spent their information-technology budgets on preventing the Y2K bug, reported yesterday that its first-quarter profit dropped 86 percent to $539,500, or 4 cents a share. Revenue for the three months that ended March 31 was $30.8 million, down 7 percent. "They were slightly above our revised expectations," said William Loomis, an analyst at Legg Mason Wood Walker in Baltimore, who had expected $30 million in revenue and earnings per share of 3 cents.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
Seniors provide a growing market, and the Anne Arundel Trade Council is giving local businesses an opportunity to tap into it at the third annual 55+ Expo next week in Glen Burnie, organizers say.The expo, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 18 at La Fontaine Bleu on Ritchie Highway, will include representatives from banks offering advice on estate planning and travel agents talking about getaways, said Jeanette Wessel, chief operating officer of the Anne Arundel...
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1996
In what it hopes to establish as an annual event, the Baltimore County Health Department held a forum yesterday to discuss public health issues with members of the business community.The program at the Towson Sheraton, "Good Public Health Is Good Business," was planned to coincide with National Public Health Week.The program included speeches by health professionals aimed at providing public health policy information for businesses.Dozens of representatives from local agencies and companies attended the meeting.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1993
Business failures down nearly 10%A reviving U.S. economy is the reason why the number of U.S. business failures fell nearly 10 percent in the first half of this year, according to Dun & Bradstreet Corp. This comes after a record number of businesses failed in the United States last year. However, the rate of increase in failures peaked during 1992, and the fourth quarter saw a decline.For the first six months of 1993, business failures were down in all major industries and nearly every U.S. Census region because of the recovery, the business information company reported.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | April 21, 1991
The last time W. Stephen Pindell of Dayton remembered being in a public library was during his college days in the late 1960s.But when Pindell, 46, lost his executive banking job of 7 1/2 years in February, it was the county library he turned to for help in preparing forhis job interviews."
BUSINESS
January 4, 1998
Cost of business: The big salaries that American executives make and the amount of taxes corporations pay make the United States the second-most expensive country for starting or operating a business, reports the Economist Intelligence Unit, a business information firm. Germany, which has high wages and taxes, is the most expensive country. Belgium is in third place, followed by Britain and France. The cheapest country for setting up or running a business was South Africa.Lease or buy? This is the golden age of auto leasing, according to Automobile magazine, which predicts leasing will account for at least 30 percent of new cars and trucks produced during 1998.
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