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NEWS
March 12, 2003
Today's highlights 10 a.m.Senate meets, Senate chamber. 10 a.m.House of Delegates meets, House chamber. 1 p.m.House Health and Government Operations Committee, hearing on bill to ban smoking in almost every indoor business in Maryland, Room 140, Lowe House Office Building.
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NEWS
January 31, 2014
Consider not only the good news, but the overarching theme that was conveyed in the recent editorial, "Building a more entrepreneurial Maryland" (Jan. 27): Those of us who are determined to make Maryland a top-notch home for starts-ups and businesses of all kinds are working together toward this goal like never before. We are determined. Clearly, our legislators and Gov. Martin O'Malley are making a concerted effort to bolster diverse job growth, while advocacy groups like the Greater Baltimore Committee and TEDCO have created forums to move the discussion forward.
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NEWS
July 4, 1999
Linton elected president of Md. Bankers AssociationA. Patrick Linton, president and chief executive officer of FCNB Bank, has been elected president of the Maryland Bankers Association.He has more than 26 years' experience in banking, 20 years at FCNB.The Maryland Bankers Association is the statewide trade and professional association representing 85 commercial banks conducting business in Maryland. FCNB Bank has branches in Carroll County.Pub Date: 7/04/99
NEWS
By Jay Bernstein | June 20, 2013
At a time when the election of a new, allegedly "moderate" president of Iran has created much excitement and raised many expectations, a more sober assessment of the nature of the Iranian regime is found in the annual report on terrorism issued by the State Department last month. As described in the report, terrorist activity in Iran "has reached a tempo unseen since the 1990s, with attacks plotted in Southeast Asia, Europe and Africa. " Iran provides financial, material and logistical support to the Taliban, Iraqi Shiite militant groups and Hezbollah, all of which have killed American soldiers, as well as to Hamas and other Palestinian terrorist groups that routinely target Israeli civilians.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2000
The Maryland Insurance Administration unveiled a new report yesterday on complaints against top auto insurers to help consumers shop for coverage. Called the complaint ratio report, it scores the top 20 insurers doing business in Maryland, based on the number of complaints against each in relation to the amount of premiums they write in the state. A score above 1.0, for instance, means that the percentage of complaints against an insurer is higher than its percentage of premiums, the agency said.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2008
Healing touch in short supply Although Maryland has plenty of doctors, it doesn't have enough who see patients, the head of the state medical society said last week. While the state has about 25,000 licensed physicians, nearly 40 percent are engaged in teaching, research and administrative duties. Foreclosure crisis grows Alarmed by signs that Maryland's burgeoning foreclosure problem will worsen before it gets better, 200 housing counselors, lenders and other officials packed a forum to talk about solutions.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1997
A Silver Spring company that runs games of chance over the Internet is moving out of state, bowing to Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.'s threats to prosecute the firm as an illegal gambling operation.RealTIME Network Inc. said it still believes it has not broken Maryland law because it set up its Internet site so that Maryland consumers would be unable to play its games, including blackjack and a TV trivia game.But the company said it would stop doing business in Maryland "out of a spirit of cooperation," according to a statement from the company's law firm.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1996
Maryland's attorney general settled yesterday a securities fraud case against a businessman who raised $2 million from Maryland investors to start a combination insurance agency, stock brokerage and buffalo-meat chain, but who allegedly lied about his past business record and the amount of his own money he put into the business.Invest Maryland Corp. and its founder, Dennis K. McLaughlin, agreed to settle the case but continued to deny that they broke state securities laws. Mr. McLaughlin gave up his office as chief executive and his stock in the company, which will continue to operate, and agreed to be barred from the securities business in Maryland.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2002
A company involved in the state's new $14 million "Smoking Stops Here" advertising campaign paid $4,300 in back state taxes yesterday as a step toward getting its corporate charter restored. However, it is uncertain whether Twenty-First Century Group Inc. will remain part of a team running the 17-month anti-smoking advertising campaign. Roger Gray, president and chief executive of GKV Communications, the prime contractor, said he is reviewing Twenty-First Century Group's role as a subcontractor.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 20, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- As a step toward heading off insurance failures in Maryland, the amount of capital an insurer in the state must keep would increase to as much as three times the current levels under a bill the House of Delegates passed yesterday.The House also passed yesterday bills that would:* Prevent policyholders from protesting the non-renewal of their policies if the insurance company is withdrawing from the state, has fileda plan of withdrawal and gives its customers 45 days' notice.* Prohibit physicians from being partners or a co-owner of pharmacies or employing a pharmacist to run a pharmacy.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
The gay couples who've booked Rouge Fine Catering in Hunt Valley for their weddings have appreciated not only good food and stylish events, but something less tangible. "They don't want to be with a caterer that is going to be judgmental," said Jonathan Soudry, Rouge chef and owner. "There is a lot of intimacy in the relationship between the caterer and the couple. " Soudry, whose business handles about 300 weddings a year, catered more than two dozen receptions for same-sex couples last year.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
It might not seem to be a bright investment right now, after weeks of seemingly endless clouds and rain, but solar panels are popping up on rooftops all over Maryland. With government help in the form of tax credits and grants, companies making equipment available through long-term lease and economies of scale bringing prices down, the industry is seeing steady and continuing growth in demand for drawing power from the sun. And Maryland is among the states experiencing a rapid expansion, with an increasing number of companies getting into sales, installation and leasing of the panels to homeowners and businesses.
BUSINESS
By Liz Kay, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2010
Several Tennessee companies and people unlicensed to sell heath insurance in Maryland have been ordered to stop selling policies to state residents, the state Insurance Commission announced Monday. About 700 Maryland residents are believed to have been scammed by companies including American Trade Association, Real Benefits Association, Smart Data Solutions and Serve America Assurance, Ltd. These companies were not licensed by Maryland and therefore had not demonstrated that they had the financial resources to pay claims, according to the insurance commission.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
In the end, the money wasn't enough. Maryland and Montgomery County economic development officials offered Northrop Grumman $22.5 million in incentives to win the headquarters of the defense contractor — one of the most lucrative financial packages ever for a state not known for ponying up big dollars to win business. But last week, Maryland still lost out to neighboring Virginia, where state officials offered $12 million to $14 million in addition to undisclosed local incentives.
NEWS
By Dawn Green | March 9, 2010
My husband was the owner and operator of Street Auto Center in Street, Maryland, for 16 years. A few days ago, I had to watch them auction off all he had. The business started from an old, rundown "shack" of a garage that my husband found one day back in 1996. We both worked overtime shifts to try to make enough money to buy the dilapidated building. We begged, borrowed and worked as hard as we could. With the help of my parents and my former employer, we were able to put a little money down and finance the rest.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2008
Healing touch in short supply Although Maryland has plenty of doctors, it doesn't have enough who see patients, the head of the state medical society said last week. While the state has about 25,000 licensed physicians, nearly 40 percent are engaged in teaching, research and administrative duties. Foreclosure crisis grows Alarmed by signs that Maryland's burgeoning foreclosure problem will worsen before it gets better, 200 housing counselors, lenders and other officials packed a forum to talk about solutions.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1998
An Ellicott City man and his securities firm have been fined $1.75 million and ordered to stop doing business in Maryland after bilking Maryland investors out of $1.6 million in a securities operation that was "nothing more than a Ponzi scheme," Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said last night.The fines were levied against Michael P. Keating Sr. and the Keating Advisory Group of Columbia.Keating had the opportunity to contest the allegations that led to the order, but did not do so, Curran said.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
When Sridhar Kalyankotti arrived in the United States from India last year to begin an assignment teaching Baltimore schoolchildren, he got an unexpected lesson of his own in the world of international recruitment, he says. Officials of the company that brought him here insisted that he and six of his colleagues immediately sign contracts to hand over nearly a third of their annual pay for the next three years to the recruiters. Kalyankotti, 32, who had paid New York-based Teachers Placement Group Inc. $5,500 in fees before he left India, refused.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | September 5, 2007
Thousands of property owners might be getting improper tax breaks on second homes and rental properties, and more than 1,100 out-of-state companies might be doing business in Maryland without registering or paying required fees, according to a legislative audit released yesterday. The state is instituting a new application procedure to ensure that Maryland residential property owners get homestead credits - which limit annual property tax increases - only on their principal residences, as the law requires.
NEWS
By MARY ELLEN SLAYTER and MARY ELLEN SLAYTER,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2006
The riders have helmets strapped tight under their chins and glossy boots up to their knees. Stacks of hay and bags of feed lean against the walls. All of the chatter in the stable is about my horse, my horse, my horse. Whose is the fastest? The gentlest? The smartest? But there's not a racetrack in sight. Or a racehorse, for that matter, at the Columbia Horse Center, a riding and boarding facility on 88 acres near Laurel. For all the attention given to racing's contributions to Maryland's economy, a significant part of the horse industry in the state is about recreation, not gambling.
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