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Business Idea

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By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
The state prosecutor is investigating allegations that the chairman of the Anne Arundel County Economic Development Corp. helped steal a business idea for a company in which he holds a financial interest.Jay I. Winer, a Crofton developer, is chairman of the board of the county-funded agency that provides loans to new business ventures. He is also a director of West Shore Communications, a local company that owns radio towers.Two Annapolis entrepreneurs say they went to the development agency last year for help in building a network of microwave towers that would improve cellular telephone links to the Eastern Shore.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Heidi Lieske's business idea came while shelling out more than $300 for a wedding-suitable outfit - for her 1-year-old son. "There has got to be a better way to do this," she thought. Her Timonium company aims to be that option for like-minded parents - people who want to dress their kids in Dior, Versace and other designer clothes for special events without the eye-popping purchase prices. Borrow Mini Couture rents dresses, suits and other outfits for ages 9 months to 4 years, priced between $30 and $99 for a five-day stint.
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NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Matthew Mosk and Laura Sullivan and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1999
A New Hampshire couple who had hoped to build a telecommunications empire are suing a current and a former board member of the Anne Arundel Economic Development Corp., alleging they stole the couple's business idea after giving them a loan.Their lawsuit, filed yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, asks for $15 million.It charges that board President Jay Winer, former board member Charles F. Delavan and their business partner, Mark Sapperstein, fraudulently made a fortune off a business idea that George and Mary Chamberlain brought to the economic development corporation in June 1996.
EXPLORE
By Pete Pichaske | April 16, 2013
To Funlayo Alabi, Shea Radiance is much more than a business. It's a mission. Started in their Ellicott City home by Funlayo and her husband, Shola, Shea Radiance sells skin and hair products made from shea butter. Since the company's beginning eight years ago, business has doubled every year, and Shea Radiance products are now sold in hundreds of outlets, including some Target and Whole Foods stores. What makes the Columbia-based business more than a moneymaking venture, however, is that raw shea butter -- like Funlayo and Shola Alabi -- comes from West Africa, extracted from the nut of the African shea tree.
NEWS
by Carson Porter | May 16, 2011
Request a free pack of Flix here . I think it's pretty much a plastic toothpick with a minty flavor to it. This sounds like a business idea that never should have made it out of the Shark Tank to me. 
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Heidi Lieske's business idea came while shelling out more than $300 for a wedding-suitable outfit - for her 1-year-old son. "There has got to be a better way to do this," she thought. Her Timonium company aims to be that option for like-minded parents - people who want to dress their kids in Dior, Versace and other designer clothes for special events without the eye-popping purchase prices. Borrow Mini Couture rents dresses, suits and other outfits for ages 9 months to 4 years, priced between $30 and $99 for a five-day stint.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | May 10, 1993
At age 27, Scott McNealy founded Sun Microsystems. Eleven years later, it's a $4 billion company, an industry leader and a standard-setter.In a recent interview with Upside, the Silicon Valley insiders' magazine, McNealy explained Sun's success.First, the company has a core concept, a clear idea of the market it wants to serve and the technology it wants to apply.Second, it has established superb vendor partnerships.Third, Sun has nurtured a strong and loyal user base (to the extent there's any loyalty in the computer industry)
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2011
Patricia Granata Eisner strives to turn Baltimore's neediest kids into business owners. As executive officer of the Baltimore office of the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship, she introduces low-income kids to the world of business plans, spreadsheets and returns on investments. Through school classes or business boot camps, NFTE helps kids come up with an idea, write a business plan and then eventually open that business. The kids, ages 11 to 18, can then enter their business plan in a national competition against other NFTE chapters.
EXPLORE
By Pete Pichaske | April 16, 2013
To Funlayo Alabi, Shea Radiance is much more than a business. It's a mission. Started in their Ellicott City home by Funlayo and her husband, Shola, Shea Radiance sells skin and hair products made from shea butter. Since the company's beginning eight years ago, business has doubled every year, and Shea Radiance products are now sold in hundreds of outlets, including some Target and Whole Foods stores. What makes the Columbia-based business more than a moneymaking venture, however, is that raw shea butter -- like Funlayo and Shola Alabi -- comes from West Africa, extracted from the nut of the African shea tree.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
John Palasits envisions an electronic menu that would enable restaurant customers to place their orders when ready instead of summoning a waiter. Rhyan Guidry foresees a personalized hairstyling studio that would teach patrons to do their own locks. And Justin Carmona is exploring opening a gym that would cater to patrons six days a week but reserve the seventh for high school teams' training. The three were among 13 Howard Community College students seeking to create and market their business ventures in a three-to five-minute product-pitching competition called "Rocket Marketing," which was held at the school this month.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
John Palasits envisions an electronic menu that would enable restaurant customers to place their orders when ready instead of summoning a waiter. Rhyan Guidry foresees a personalized hairstyling studio that would teach patrons to do their own locks. And Justin Carmona is exploring opening a gym that would cater to patrons six days a week but reserve the seventh for high school teams' training. The three were among 13 Howard Community College students seeking to create and market their business ventures in a three-to five-minute product-pitching competition called "Rocket Marketing," which was held at the school this month.
NEWS
by Carson Porter | May 16, 2011
Request a free pack of Flix here . I think it's pretty much a plastic toothpick with a minty flavor to it. This sounds like a business idea that never should have made it out of the Shark Tank to me. 
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2011
One mobile application lets people know the ratio of single people to married people at a bar or restaurant. One website lets owners of vacant buildings poll the crowd to see what kind of business should move into the neighborhood. Another app lets teachers use Facebook as a tool. These are a handful of apps that came to life in Baltimore during the city's first Startup Weekend. More than 125 people descended on Baltimore from as far away as New York City for the chance to rapidly develop their ideas into prototypes, in hopes of becoming the next Facebook or Google.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2011
Patricia Granata Eisner strives to turn Baltimore's neediest kids into business owners. As executive officer of the Baltimore office of the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship, she introduces low-income kids to the world of business plans, spreadsheets and returns on investments. Through school classes or business boot camps, NFTE helps kids come up with an idea, write a business plan and then eventually open that business. The kids, ages 11 to 18, can then enter their business plan in a national competition against other NFTE chapters.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2005
A plan to rejuvenate Brooklyn and Curtis Bay won approval from the city planning department yesterday, but not without fierce objections from area business owners, who oppose the creation of a community advisory panel. The purpose of the advisory panel is to urge area businesses to establish a closer relationship with local residents. Although the plan is nonbinding and has no regulatory teeth, business leaders objected to the small portion that called for the advisory panel. They said its language is unclear and could result in an additional layer of oversight.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2002
Westminster elected officials put their stamp of approval on a sister-city relationship with the Estonian city of Paide last night by signing on to a plan that would promote cross-cultural exchanges between business representatives, arts groups, students and municipal employees. At last night's Common Council meeting, Westminster Mayor Kevin E. Dayhoff and Paide Mayor Tonis Koiv endorsed an agreement that outlines several swaps between the two cities. The plans include sending manufacturing and high-tech executives from Westminster to Paide to review investment opportunities, and exchanging municipal employees to generate ways to solve each city's problems.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | March 7, 1994
When I worked for McKinsey & Co., our consulting reports were shaped by the "pyramid style" of writing. At the apex was a grand conclusion ("Moving away from mainframes makes sensefor XYZ Computers Inc."). The base was a carefully constructed framework of supporting propositions (e.g., "Technological change is shifting computational power to the desktop").A well-crafted presentation was a marvel to behold. The client was carefully led down a fact-lined path toward the nirvana of a flawless business strategy.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
FREDERICK - For Derek Taylor, it's a dream course. With 15 fellow Mount St. Mary's College students this summer, he'll start a small business financed by his professor. If the venture fails, the professor absorbs the loss. If it succeeds, Taylor and the other student stockholders will share the profits. And he'll get three credits in the bargain. "Where else could you take a business course spending someone else's money?" said Taylor, 23, a business major. Plans for the course were announced here yesterday by John Laughlin, a Frederick investor and adjunct professor at Mount St. Mary's.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
FREDERICK - For Derek Taylor, it's a dream course. With 15 fellow Mount St. Mary's College students this summer, he'll start a small business financed by his professor. If the venture fails, the professor absorbs the loss. If it succeeds, Taylor and the other student stockholders will share the profits. And he'll get three credits in the bargain. "Where else could you take a business course spending someone else's money?" said Taylor, 23, a business major. Plans for the course were announced here yesterday by John Laughlin, a Frederick investor and adjunct professor at Mount St. Mary's.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Matthew Mosk and Laura Sullivan and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1999
A New Hampshire couple who had hoped to build a telecommunications empire are suing a current and a former board member of the Anne Arundel Economic Development Corp., alleging they stole the couple's business idea after giving them a loan.Their lawsuit, filed yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, asks for $15 million.It charges that board President Jay Winer, former board member Charles F. Delavan and their business partner, Mark Sapperstein, fraudulently made a fortune off a business idea that George and Mary Chamberlain brought to the economic development corporation in June 1996.
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