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Business Failures

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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,The Dun & Bradstreet Corp | April 27, 1991
Because of continuing real estate and bank troubles, the number and size of Maryland business failures are rising sharply, bankruptcy attorneys and financial experts say.A survey by the Dun & Bradstreet Corp. found that the number of Maryland business failures has doubled in the first three months of 1991, and the size of the failures has rocketed more than tenfold.Howard Rubenstein, a Baltimore attorney who has been handling bankruptcies for 36 years, said he's never seen so many, or such large, business failures as he's seen so far this year.
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NEWS
July 15, 2013
It is fact that the financial downturn of recent years has impacted many people in and out of government. Many individuals' incomes have been dramatically (and, in many cases permanently) affected by general economic conditions - cutbacks, downsizing, business failures, etc. It appears that this situation, though unfortunate, is the result of the decision makers compressing the required furloughs into a short period of time ("Sequester pain hits home," July 12).Yes, it results in a 20 percent pay cut, but for 11 weeks, not 52 weeks.
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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1995
In what could be a sign that Maryland's economy may be weakening, the number of business failures rose in the first quarter of the year, the Dun & Bradstreet Corp. has reported.Although local business people and bankruptcy lawyers disputed the analysis, the Wilton, Conn.-based research company said the number of business failures has been rising steadily in Maryland since 1993.And in the first three months of 1995, the number of businesses that declared bankruptcy, closed or caused losses for creditors reached 385, 19 percent more than in the same period a year ago."
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
Tony Siragusa isn't the prettiest of men. The former Baltimore Raven played the thankless role of a 6-foot-3, 330-pound steel drum, crashing the line over and over, so teammates could sack the quarterback - and reap the glory. But "Goose" was a member of the team that won Super Bowl XXXV, and the gregarious giant's profile has grown exponentially since that January day in 2001. He's a Fox-TV sideline reporter, host of a home improvement show and has been cast in "The Sopranos" and the film "25th Hour.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | February 14, 1992
LONDON -- The people of Britain got the message yesterday that their sinking economy is sinking faster than they thought. In fact, they got it twice.New figures published by the government revealed that joblessness has reached 9.2 percent in the United Kingdom, the highest level in more than four years.In January, 2.7 million Britons were out of work. Since March, nearly a million additional people have begun collecting unemployment benefits, and the figures released yesterday did not reflect the massive layoffs announced this week in the automotive and aerospace industries -- nearly 5,000, and expected to go much higher.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
Maryland businesses expecting increases in hiring and revenue reached a two-year high recently, according to a survey by the University of Baltimore, signaling continued expansion for the state's economy.But state job growth in the last year hasn't kept pace with revenues, the poll suggested, and a separate survey by Dun & Bradstreet shows that potential for business failures is higher in Maryland than nationally.Three-fourths of companies surveyed by the University of Baltimore said they expect sales growth in the next year, up from 65 percent earlier in 1996.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | December 22, 1991
NEW YORK -- Unemployment, after briefly stabilizing, appeared to slide once again. Business failures were high and magazine advertising was poor.2 "I can't explain why people are so depressed."
BUSINESS
August 4, 1993
Business failures down nearly 10%A reviving U.S. economy is the reason why the number of U.S. business failures fell nearly 10 percent in the first half of this year, according to Dun & Bradstreet Corp. This comes after a record number of businesses failed in the United States last year. However, the rate of increase in failures peaked during 1992, and the fourth quarter saw a decline.For the first six months of 1993, business failures were down in all major industries and nearly every U.S. Census region because of the recovery, the business information company reported.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1992
Cyrix copies Intel's chipCyrix Corp. introduced the first true copy of Intel Corp.'s top microprocessor chip yesterday, perhaps intensifying competition for the leading maker of these "brains" of personal computers. Cyrix' new chip performs like Intel's 486 chip, its most powerful microprocessor and most profitable product, Cyrix said.United files complaint about JapanUnited Airlines said yesterday that it filed a complaint with the federal government seeking retaliation for Japan's alleged violation of a bilateral aviation agreement.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1994
Business failures up in Md.Maryland was one of only five states where the number of business failures rose during the first half of the year, said a survey released yesterday, as economic growth in major industries pushed failures down 20 percent nationwide.A total of 36,790 U.S. businesses failed during the period, compared with 45,906 during the first half of 1993, Dun & Bradstreet reported.The only states with a rise in failures were Arkansas, 45 percent; Montana, 30 percent; Oregon, 25 percent; Maryland, 8 percent; and Washington state, 3 percent.
NEWS
January 25, 2001
THE STATE of California made its bed. It enacted partial electric power deregulation - wholesale but not retail - in the hope that a permanent supply surplus would always keep price down. California grew its economy, increasing power use by one-fourth in the past five years while building no generating capacity in a decade. California was legally, structurally and emotionally unprepared for a shortage. Then the rains stopped in neighboring states, on whose hydroelectric power generation California arrogantly depends.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 22, 1997
TOKYO -- Yamaichi Securities Co., Japan's fourth largest brokerage firm, plans to file with regulators to cease operations in what would be Japan's biggest business failure since World War II, according to published reports.Yamaichi's debt rating was downgraded to junk by Moody's Investors Service yesterday, making it harder and more expensive for the firm to borrow. Securities firms borrow billions of dollars to finance their investments and they risk going out of business if they can't roll over those debts.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
Maryland businesses expecting increases in hiring and revenue reached a two-year high recently, according to a survey by the University of Baltimore, signaling continued expansion for the state's economy.But state job growth in the last year hasn't kept pace with revenues, the poll suggested, and a separate survey by Dun & Bradstreet shows that potential for business failures is higher in Maryland than nationally.Three-fourths of companies surveyed by the University of Baltimore said they expect sales growth in the next year, up from 65 percent earlier in 1996.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1995
In what could be a sign that Maryland's economy may be weakening, the number of business failures rose in the first quarter of the year, the Dun & Bradstreet Corp. has reported.Although local business people and bankruptcy lawyers disputed the analysis, the Wilton, Conn.-based research company said the number of business failures has been rising steadily in Maryland since 1993.And in the first three months of 1995, the number of businesses that declared bankruptcy, closed or caused losses for creditors reached 385, 19 percent more than in the same period a year ago."
BUSINESS
August 3, 1994
Business failures up in Md.Maryland was one of only five states where the number of business failures rose during the first half of the year, said a survey released yesterday, as economic growth in major industries pushed failures down 20 percent nationwide.A total of 36,790 U.S. businesses failed during the period, compared with 45,906 during the first half of 1993, Dun & Bradstreet reported.The only states with a rise in failures were Arkansas, 45 percent; Montana, 30 percent; Oregon, 25 percent; Maryland, 8 percent; and Washington state, 3 percent.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1994
NBC to work with Mexican firmIn a move aimed at reaping some of the expected rewards of the North American Free Trade Agreement, NBC entered an alliance yesterday with Mexico's newly privatized television broadcasting company, agreeing to provide technical assistance and programming in exchange for a future stake in the company and access to one of the fastest-growing markets in the world.Under the terms of an agreement, NBC has a three-year option to acquire 10 percent to 20 percent of the Mexican company, Television Azteca, which had been owned by the government until it was sold to investors last July.
NEWS
July 15, 2013
It is fact that the financial downturn of recent years has impacted many people in and out of government. Many individuals' incomes have been dramatically (and, in many cases permanently) affected by general economic conditions - cutbacks, downsizing, business failures, etc. It appears that this situation, though unfortunate, is the result of the decision makers compressing the required furloughs into a short period of time ("Sequester pain hits home," July 12).Yes, it results in a 20 percent pay cut, but for 11 weeks, not 52 weeks.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1994
NBC to work with Mexican firmIn a move aimed at reaping some of the expected rewards of the North American Free Trade Agreement, NBC entered an alliance yesterday with Mexico's newly privatized television broadcasting company, agreeing to provide technical assistance and programming in exchange for a future stake in the company and access to one of the fastest-growing markets in the world.Under the terms of an agreement, NBC has a three-year option to acquire 10 percent to 20 percent of the Mexican company, Television Azteca, which had been owned by the government until it was sold to investors last July.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1993
Food Lion settles labor chargesFood Lion Inc., one of the country's fastest-growing supermarket chains, has agreed to pay $16.2 million to settle charges that it violated child labor laws and failed to pay thousands of workers required overtime.The settlement, which ended more than eight months of negotiations with the Labor Department, is the largest ever reached by the federal government in a wage-and-hour case involving a private employer.Bond program aids small firmsGov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday announced a new state-financed surety bonding program designed to help small and minority-owned companies compete for $500 million in construction contracts awarded annually by the Maryland Department of Transportation.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1993
Business failures down nearly 10%A reviving U.S. economy is the reason why the number of U.S. business failures fell nearly 10 percent in the first half of this year, according to Dun & Bradstreet Corp. This comes after a record number of businesses failed in the United States last year. However, the rate of increase in failures peaked during 1992, and the fourth quarter saw a decline.For the first six months of 1993, business failures were down in all major industries and nearly every U.S. Census region because of the recovery, the business information company reported.
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