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NEWS
August 23, 2010
Professor Thomas DiLorenzo's article, "Business ethics' wrong focus" (Commentary, Aug. 22), unfortunately contains a misinformed premise. He claims that "(b)usiness ethics courses typically combine anti-business moralizing with advocacy of more government regulation…" This ultimately leads him to a conclusion that a focus on business ethics by universities represents a "disservice. " Professor DiLorenzo might be surprised to learn that I and most other business ethics professors are committed capitalists.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
A longtime Towson University professor has resigned his post as the head of the city school system's ethics panel amid allegations that his published academic articles contain content from dozens of sources without proper - or in some cases any - attribution. University officials and journal publishers say they are reviewing several articles submitted by Benjamin A. Neil, a legal affairs professor, after a librarian at another university alerted them to the issue. A Baltimore Sun review of five papers published by Neil shows passages with identical language and others with close similarities to scholarly journals, news publications, congressional testimony, blogs and websites.
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NEWS
By Thomas DiLorenzo | August 22, 2010
Under the dubious proposition that the current economic crisis was caused by a sudden outburst of greed (as though greed did not always exist), a new growth industry in America is the teaching of "business ethics" at the university level. Business ethics courses tend to cherry-pick isolated examples of unethical behavior in the business world and insinuate that such behavior is inherent in all businesses. This ignores the reality of how markets work and misinforms students. Dishonest business people will be punished financially as customers cater to their competitors while suppliers refuse to do business with them.
EXPLORE
February 13, 2012
Students from Catonsville and Lansdowne high schools and Western School of Technology and Environmental Science were among the 161 from19 Baltimore County public schools whose scores at a regional competition qualified them for the statewide Future Business Leaders of America conference in Hunt Valley in April. During the Feb 1 regional competition at Dundalk High School, 263 students participated in online events, such as accounting, business law, cyber security and global business; and 89 participated in performance events, including business ethics, public speaking, emerging business issues and client service.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | February 4, 1991
Unflattering portraits of the business world abound.The headlines tell of venal plunderers laying waste to the savings and loan industry and to venerable Wall Street institutions. On any given day, it seems, a major defense contractor is on the hook for falsifying product claims or passing bribes. The generic pharmaceuticals industry is weathering a drug-switching scandal that's even tainted the Food and Drug Administration. Before Eastern Airlines stopped flying, the government accused it of cutting corners on safety.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 12, 1999
Join the Baltimore City Police Department. Low pay but free sensitivity training.Don't drink milk! Evidence is that users may risk contracting a white mustache.Polls show that half of all adult Californians would favor Hillary Clinton for U.S. senator from New York.Cheer up. Olympics meister Samaranch has asked Henry Kissinger to consult on the business ethics of the Games.Pub Date: 4/12/99
EXPLORE
June 15, 2011
The Gow School announced that Daniel Scher, of Towson, has chosen to continue his education at Marshall University this fall. Gow is a boarding school for dyslexic young men in grades seven through 12. Brian Knudsen, of Towson, earned a Ph.D in public policy and management in May from Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh. He is the son of Kenneth and Mary Knudsen and a 1996 graduate of Towson High School. Elise Jason, a 2007 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School, graduated in May summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, from Virginia Polytechnic Institute.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 22, 2000
WASHINGTON - About 50 top contractors have kept getting government money despite guilty pleas or settlements in civil and criminal fraud cases since 1995, according to a recent General Accounting Office study. Whether prospective contractors should be penalized for fraud or violating labor, environmental and other federal regulations is a hot Capitol Hill issue these days, pitting Republicans in Congress against the Clinton administration and big business against big labor. The general idea of contractor reform was to allow federal agencies to deny business to contractors that lack a satisfactory record of integrity and business ethics, according to the proposal.
BUSINESS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2000
A national survey of ethics in the workplace has found that a third of all workers observe misconduct and abuse in their jobs, but that half of them don't report the misconduct for fear of being labeled a "troublemaker." The findings come at a time when most U.S. businesses have adopted ethics training programs or ethical codes of conduct. But the survey of 1,500 workers, conducted by the Ethics Resource Center in Washington and released yesterday, found that one in three workers said they regularly observe managers or co-workers lying, withholding information, abusing or discriminating against employees.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Prof. Thomas DiLorenzo obscures more than enlightens when he argues that government, not business, is more inherently immoral because of government's power to legally coerce wealth from others ("Business ethics' wrong focus," Commentary, Aug. 22). This distinction between "business" and "government" ignores the historical fact that businesses, once they've made a great deal of money, can use their wealth to effectively purchase the government they want. It also ignores constitutional recognition of corporations as "persons" which protects CEOs and corporate board members from fines or imprisonment should they pollute, extort, or steal.
EXPLORE
June 15, 2011
The Gow School announced that Daniel Scher, of Towson, has chosen to continue his education at Marshall University this fall. Gow is a boarding school for dyslexic young men in grades seven through 12. Brian Knudsen, of Towson, earned a Ph.D in public policy and management in May from Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh. He is the son of Kenneth and Mary Knudsen and a 1996 graduate of Towson High School. Elise Jason, a 2007 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School, graduated in May summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, from Virginia Polytechnic Institute.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Prof. Thomas DiLorenzo obscures more than enlightens when he argues that government, not business, is more inherently immoral because of government's power to legally coerce wealth from others ("Business ethics' wrong focus," Commentary, Aug. 22). This distinction between "business" and "government" ignores the historical fact that businesses, once they've made a great deal of money, can use their wealth to effectively purchase the government they want. It also ignores constitutional recognition of corporations as "persons" which protects CEOs and corporate board members from fines or imprisonment should they pollute, extort, or steal.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Professor Thomas DiLorenzo's article, "Business ethics' wrong focus" (Commentary, Aug. 22), unfortunately contains a misinformed premise. He claims that "(b)usiness ethics courses typically combine anti-business moralizing with advocacy of more government regulation…" This ultimately leads him to a conclusion that a focus on business ethics by universities represents a "disservice. " Professor DiLorenzo might be surprised to learn that I and most other business ethics professors are committed capitalists.
NEWS
By Thomas DiLorenzo | August 22, 2010
Under the dubious proposition that the current economic crisis was caused by a sudden outburst of greed (as though greed did not always exist), a new growth industry in America is the teaching of "business ethics" at the university level. Business ethics courses tend to cherry-pick isolated examples of unethical behavior in the business world and insinuate that such behavior is inherent in all businesses. This ignores the reality of how markets work and misinforms students. Dishonest business people will be punished financially as customers cater to their competitors while suppliers refuse to do business with them.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 6, 2005
Seton Hall University senior Sheena Collum wonders why students at a Catholic institution that is named after a saint are studying business ethics in a building named after a convicted felon. The existence of Kozlowski Hall troubled students and faculty at the school of 10,000 in South Orange, N.J., even before donor L. Dennis Kozlowski was convicted in June of grand larceny. The former Tyco International Ltd. chief executive officer, a 1968 Seton Hall graduate, could face as much as 30 years in prison when he is sentenced this year for looting the company.
NEWS
By Blanca Torres and Blanca Torres,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2005
Consensual or not, when it's the boss involved, office romance doesn't look good. Sometimes it's the stuff of watercooler gossip. Other times, it's the end of a career. Bendix Corp. was rocked by scandal during the 1980s when the company's president and an executive assistant were rumored to be having an affair. A top executive at office supply company Staples resigned in 1997 after a "non-business relationship" with his secretary became public. Boeing Co. Chief Executive Harry Stonecipher was forced to resign this week after an extramarital affair he had had with a company executive leaked out. Board members said Stonecipher failed to uphold company ethics standards that he had helped develop after his predecessor was forced out in an ethics scandal.
EXPLORE
February 13, 2012
Students from Catonsville and Lansdowne high schools and Western School of Technology and Environmental Science were among the 161 from19 Baltimore County public schools whose scores at a regional competition qualified them for the statewide Future Business Leaders of America conference in Hunt Valley in April. During the Feb 1 regional competition at Dundalk High School, 263 students participated in online events, such as accounting, business law, cyber security and global business; and 89 participated in performance events, including business ethics, public speaking, emerging business issues and client service.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 6, 2005
Seton Hall University senior Sheena Collum wonders why students at a Catholic institution that is named after a saint are studying business ethics in a building named after a convicted felon. The existence of Kozlowski Hall troubled students and faculty at the school of 10,000 in South Orange, N.J., even before donor L. Dennis Kozlowski was convicted in June of grand larceny. The former Tyco International Ltd. chief executive officer, a 1968 Seton Hall graduate, could face as much as 30 years in prison when he is sentenced this year for looting the company.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
The high-profile legal entanglements of former Enron Chief Executive Officer Kenneth L. Lay, style guru Martha Stewart and other executives are prompting a major transformation in the way corporate America regards ethics, industry watchdogs say. Business schools and corporations are scrambling to expand their programs, new associations are forming and new laws and rules are appearing on the books. And while the ultimate impact of photos and headlines of executive perp walks and trials is uncertain, those in the field are seizing the moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Sun Staff | February 15, 2004
"Any man who tries to be good all the time is bound to come to ruin among the great number who are not good. Hence a prince who wants to keep his authority must learn how not to be good and use that knowledge, or refrain from using it, as necessity requires." -- The Prince, Niccolo Machiavelli, 1469-1527 If there is any truth to the saying that a man's character can be assessed by observing what he reads, then it is easy to understand the current sad state of business ethics in America.
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