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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
The Johns Hopkins University is pitching a new Global MBA program to students around the world. Loyola University Maryland's business school is luring professionals still fresh in their careers to a new, intensive one-year MBA program. Even the Maryland Institute College of Art is getting down to business, offering students with a creative flair a chance to learn business principles in a new master's program developed for next spring. These programs have sprouted up at Baltimore colleges during one of the bleakest economic periods in decades.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Milford Mill junior Dionna White, a three-time All-Metro first-team combo guard, has committed to play for Georgetown. In March, White led the No. 3 Millers to their first state title since 2008 and the best record in school history, 26-1. Combining exceptional athleticism with uncanny basketball instincts, she averaged 21 points, 6.5 assists and 8.7 rebounds. Milford Mill coach DeToiya McAliley said Georgetown coach Natasha Adair, who took over the Hoyas in April, was the first coach to extended White a written scholarship offer.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 14, 2011
Lillian Blanche Stevens, a retired Baltimore County business teacher and administrator, died Oct. 6 at the Edenwald Retirement Community in Towson. She was 96 and had earlier lived in Rodgers Forge. Anita Sue Tews, a niece who lives in Federal Way, Wash., said no medical cause of death was determined. She was born on a farming homestead north of Edison, Neb. After graduating from a special program at Edison High School, she began teaching at 17 in a one-room, eight-grade rural school house in Webster County.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Henry E. "Pete" Riecks, a retired Harford County public schools educator and photographer who was an ardent fan of the old Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad, died Sept. 22 of Alzheimer's disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Forest Hill resident was 79. "He was really a mild-mannered and soft-spoken guy who lived near the Ma & Pa's Forest Hill station. He was very knowledgeable and was always willing to help," said Rudy Fischer, archivist of the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad Historical Society and a longtime friend.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | June 23, 1991
Low enrollment in some high school programs will mean layoffs for five teachers, cuts from full- to half-time jobs for two, and reassignments for two others for the next school year.The nine teachers affected are just over one-third of the 24 teachers who received notices in April that they might face layoffs, cutbacks in hours or reassignment."The goal is not to wipe programs out but to strike a balance," said James R. McGowan. As associate superintendent for administration and instruction, McGowan is responsible for staffing decisions.
NEWS
April 18, 2006
Ruby E. Garrett, a retired Baltimore public school educator who stressed the importance of a college education to her students, died of heart failure Wednesday at her Lochearn home. She was 78. She was born and raised Ruby Edith Tobias in Newberry County, South Carolina. She earned a bachelor's degree in business education in 1953 from Allen University in Columbia, S.C., came to Baltimore in 1954 and began teaching adults in the city schools' Concentrated Employment Program, which was in the old Polytechnic Institute on North Avenue.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2003
Jerry Edward Miller, a business education teacher at Pikesville High School, died Wednesday of a heart attack while driving. The Reisterstown resident was 56. Known for his Mickey Mouse ties and tenacious dedication to Pikesville High, Mr. Miller taught at the school for 33 years. He was a popular teacher in the community, often teaching two generations of families. "The genuineness of him and the sincerity has traversed the generations to the point where he is considered such an integral part of this community," said Dorothy E. Hardin, the school's principal.
BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | January 7, 1991
The only thing better than a little media attention to reverse the fortunes of a struggling enterprise is a lot of it.The armed forces reported a significant increase in would-be recruits at recruitment centers after the release of the blockbuster military film "Top Gun" several years ago, and gymnastics schools popped up like mushrooms overnight in the United States after the dynamic display of Soviet gymnast Olga Korbut in the 1972 Summer Olympics.But...
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes | September 24, 1990
It was a long summer for former Glen Burnie High business education teacher Joyce Coleman. In June she was laid off after 18 years in the school. She wasn't sure what she'd do next.Coleman found solace amid doubt in the thought of 200 students protesting her layoff in front of the school and their parents pleading with board members to not fire her.And on Sept. 4, she was asked to return to the classroom. This time, it would be in the county's vocational education program."If this hadn't worked out, I would have probably taken a neighbor's offer to work with an alternative program for young adults that people have given up on," Coleman said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2012
Bernard T. Ferrari's diverse career took another turn in July when he became the second dean in the history of the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School. Ferrari started out as a surgeon before a switch to management, which included a five-year stint as the chief operating officer for the Ochsner Clinic, now known as the Ochsner Medical Center, in Louisiana. From there, he became a senior health care consultant and then director of the global health care practice at McKinsey & Co., a management consultant.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 21, 2013
My new book concerns the countercultural views of today's progressive Democrats. This is not your father's liberalism, and it is certainly far removed from the local Democratic Party I was exposed to as a young kid growing up in Arbutus. That Democratic Party was blue collar in orientation and pretty conservative to boot. Its platform was pro-labor, pro-life, pro-gun, and it was led by small businessmen - many of whom were longtime chairmen of legislative committees in the Maryland General Assembly.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2012
Bernard T. Ferrari's diverse career took another turn in July when he became the second dean in the history of the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School. Ferrari started out as a surgeon before a switch to management, which included a five-year stint as the chief operating officer for the Ochsner Clinic, now known as the Ochsner Medical Center, in Louisiana. From there, he became a senior health care consultant and then director of the global health care practice at McKinsey & Co., a management consultant.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
Lillian Blanche Stevens, a retired Baltimore County business teacher and administrator, died Oct. 6 at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. She was 96 and had lived in Rodgers Forge. Anita Sue Tews, a niece who lives in Federal Way, Wash., said the cause of death had not been determined. Ms. Stevens was born on a farming homestead north of Edison, Neb. After graduating from a special program at Edison High School, she began teaching at 17 in a one-room, eight-grade rural schoolhouse in Webster County, Neb. She told family members she started a fire of corncobs and coal in a stove each morning to warm the classroom.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Walk into Pristine Antiques, Collectibles & Gifts in Taneytown, and you'll see a hodgepodge of products. There's Toni Fabrick's custom-made fascinators, the whimsical mini-hats anchored on headbands, hanging on a display in the window. Nearby are Annie DeGeorge's hand-carved wooden Santa figurines and purses made from salvaged sweaters. "I've had spaces in 12 different antique malls in Maryland and Pennsylvania, and this is the only place where I've made an appreciable amount of money," said DeGeorge, who has been renting shelf space in Priscilla Shoap's store for a year.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
Second-year chemistry teacher Mark Wilcox has never had a lot of colleagues at Patterson High School who could help him think up lesson plans or new approaches to a topic. But he has imagined the benefits of reaching across the city and state to those who might have created a better way to teach a chemistry concept. State education officials and business leaders put Wilcox and 29 other teachers in a room and asked them to dream up an online network that would help them be better teachers.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
The Johns Hopkins University is pitching a new Global MBA program to students around the world. Loyola University Maryland's business school is luring professionals still fresh in their careers to a new, intensive one-year MBA program. Even the Maryland Institute College of Art is getting down to business, offering students with a creative flair a chance to learn business principles in a new master's program developed for next spring. These programs have sprouted up at Baltimore colleges during one of the bleakest economic periods in decades.
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