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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
The Downtown Partnership plans to unveil an ambitious proposal Friday to create more than $100 million worth of new parks and public plazas throughout the central business district, including major projects for the Inner Harbor, Charles Center and west side. The proposal would transform the downtown landscape, with a green oasis where the 1st Mariner Arena stands and possibly the demolition of the Lexington Market Arcade to reopen the street as a public thoroughfare. The proposed work could also involve the realignment of city streets to make way for plazas and streetscape improvements.
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NEWS
September 8, 2014
City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young is expected Tuesday to formally begin the process of finding a replacement for former Councilman William H. Cole IV, who resigned to become head of the Baltimore Development Corporation. Much is at stake for Mr. Cole's district, which encompasses a diverse array of neighborhoods and the city's central business district, but much is also at stake for the council itself to show that it has learned from the debacle that ensued last time it had a vacancy.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
When Towson American Legion Post 22 commander Jim Rebbert looks at a planner's drawing envisioning a future for the patch of land where the post now stands, he gets the jitters. The drawings show businesses and apartments along pleasant, tree-lined thoroughfares, but not the Legion post. "You don't see us there, need I say more?" Rebbert said. T he Legion's leaders have no intention of going anywhere. The county is considering several changes this year that would extend the boundaries of downtown Towson, including one that would allow more intense development on the 14-acre triangular expanse where the Legion post stands just south of Towson Circle.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
For the first time in more than a decade, the sprawling House of Delegates district that extends from southwest Baltimore County through Howard County is in play. With three long-serving incumbents retiring from District 12, a large field of competitors is hoping to pounce on a rare opportunity to win election in what is seen as a diverse and important district. The wide-open race has attracted 13 candidates, including two physicians, a former speechwriter for Gov. Martin O'Malley and a former state lawmaker who is financing his campaign with $85,000 of his own money.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 16, 2003
A proposal to expand Westminster's business district west along Pennsylvania Avenue and into a primarily residential area has been given an unfavorable review by the city's planning and zoning commission. The proposal now heads to the city's Common Council, which is to schedule a public hearing before taking action. Thomas B. Beyard, the city's director of planning and public works, said the proposal would probably not be on the city council's agenda until January. The proposed zoning amendment would allow the establishment of light business, such as coffeehouses and art galleries, from West Main Street to Sullivan Avenue.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1997
Against a backdrop of recent optimism about downtown Baltimore, a prominent business group said yesterday that the central business district is seriously threatened by physical decay, soaring office vacancies and lack of investment.The report, by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, highlights the growing number of empty offices in downtown's older, "Class B" buildings. It arrives as city leaders increasingly are talking about demolishing more of those buildings to make room for development.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1999
Six Morgan State University graduate students displayed their ideas yesterday for enhancing the Waverly business district on Greenmount Avenue, site of a new "Main Street" effort.While their designs will not definitely be implemented, it was a chance to rethink the "self-image" and identity of the area centered at 33rd Street and Greenmount Avenue, said Frank Jannuzi, president of the Charles Village Community Benefits District. "I found so much that was attractive and provocative."Main Street is a national program that promotes more vibrant downtown areas.
NEWS
September 18, 1998
IN MODERN Baltimore, like most cities, it has been assumed that certain key economic activities need to be located in the central business district. The decision by Piper & Marbury to move to a suburban neighborhood challenges those assumptions. If Maryland's largest law firm no longer requires a downtown perch, who does?Piper & Marbury's announcement shocked city boosters, particularly because Francis B. Burch Jr., the Piper & Marbury chairman, is a vice chairman of the Greater Baltimore Committee.
NEWS
December 10, 1997
THE GOOD NEWS is that Inner Harbor office buildings have recovered from recession. The bad news is that this success has not yet spread to the older buildings in the central business district. Or as Laurie Schwartz of Downtown Partnership puts it, "Pratt Street may have the high buildings and high occupancy, but it's the financial district with its high vacancies that's casting the shadow on downtown's future."This dichotomy underscores the fragility of the downtown real estate market.While the IBM skyscraper at 100 East Pratt Street sold recently for a record $137 million, many older buildings farther away from the harbor are languishing.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1999
Trying to strike a balance between promoting new businesses and controlling traffic on East Baltimore Street, the Taneytown City Council will vote on two zoning ordinances tonight that would modify the downtown business district.The council will vote on the ordinances after a public hearing at 7: 30 p.m.The ordinances are in response to increasing interest from business owners and potential business owners who want to locate along the city's main corridor, said Chip Boyles, city manager."There's been a number of inquiries," Boyles said.
NEWS
December 14, 2013
Rumors of downtown Baltimore's demise, it seems, have been greatly exaggerated. The decision this week by money manager and downtown anchor T. Rowe Price to stay in its Pratt Street headquarters through at least 2027 should alleviate fears that the city's traditional central business district will empty out in favor of fancier and newer quarters in Harbor East. T. Rowe executives heard the siren song of developer Michael Beatty's presentation about the mini-city he plans to build at Harbor Point, and decided to stay, no lashing to the mast required.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
Northern District police said that the 3600 block of Falls Road has reopened to traffic after hazmat crews closed the thoroughfare because of an ammonia leak. The Fire Department arrived at the location, in the heart of the Hampden business district, about 7:30 a.m. Saturday. The leak came from a faulty compressor, and fire officials said the tank feeding the compressor had been shut down about noon. By mid-afternoon, businesses were still shut down as authorities ventilated the hazardous gas. No one was injured by the ammonia leak.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Herman Katkow, a retired clothing store owner who became the voice of Baltimore's small retail entrepreneur in City Hall, Annapolis and Congress, died of kidney failure Thursday at Vantage House in Columbia. The Mount Washington resident was 95. As the longtime director of the Mayor's Advisory Committee on Small Business, he served under Mayors Theodore R. McKeldin, J. Harold Grady, Phillip Goodman, Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, William Donald Schaefer, Clarence H. Du Burns and Kurt L. Schmoke.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
It is not every day that a state senator objects to a business in his district receiving a state-subsidized loan to renovate or revitalize a building. Sen. James Brochin's opposition to a proposed $240,000 loan to The Greene Turtle in Towson rests on one principle - that government shouldn't be in the business of subsidizing business. "There are many other businesses in my district that are expanding and hiring people that are as worthy as Greene Turtle ," Mr. Brochin wrote in an Aug. 14 letter to two of the three members of the Board of Public Works.
NEWS
May 13, 2013
Harbor East is moving farther east with baker-cum-developer John Paterakis Sr.'s announcement Friday that he will break ground this summer on a new, mega-Whole Foods and later on a new residential/retail building across Central Avenue from the glittering mini-city he has almost single handedly built during the last 15 years. Things are bustling in that corner of the city, what with the planned construction of a new headquarters office tower for Exelon Corp. and a variety of other smaller scale residential, retail, office and hotel developments nearby.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
A construction mishap led Saturday to prolonged closures of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and the West Nursery Road business corridor near BWI, but state officials said the roads should reopen by rush hour Monday morning. The problem occurred as crews were carrying out a bridge replacement procedure that was being used for the first time in Maryland. To replace the two spans of the West Nursery Road overpass, they planned to wheel away the old bridges — built in 1948 — and roll new ones in. But they had to halt their work about 12:45 a.m. because the existing bridge deck shifted while they attempted to remove it, according to Valerie Burnette Edgar, spokeswoman for the State Highway Administration.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1996
Buoyed by the success last month of Celebrate Taneytown, the city's first festival, business and government leaders now are hoping to reinvent the city's central business district.Fresh paint is Mayor W. Robert Flickinger's vision. Frank W. Neubauer, chairman of the Taneytown Economic Development Commission, looks for aesthetics and an active, not just cosmetic, business redevelopment. Nancy McCormick, chairman of the commission's beautification committee, wants an atmosphere that will nurture existing businesses and attract new ones.
EXPLORE
September 19, 2012
On Sept. 13, the Arbutus Business and Professional Association celebrated the completion of the Leeds Avenue repaving project and the beginning of the East Drive repaving project with County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, many elected officials and community leaders. I love Arbutus! It's full of hard working people, entrepreneurs and businesses. We have elected officials with their behind-the-scenes people who work tirelessly for us, and community associations who support us. We have an Ice Cream Cottage, town hall, lots of fun eateries and our very own neighborhood movie theater.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Calvert Center, a 17-story office building between Mercy Medical Center and Battle Monument Park, is set to go to auction in October, the auctioneer announced. The roughly 412,000-square-foot high-rise, which formerly housed Bank of America's local operations center, is to be sold at auction on Oct. 11. Bids must be at least $14 per square foot, according to CBRE Auction Services. Seven percent of the building, located at 225 N. Calvert St., is currently occupied, auction materials say. Several major downtown office buildings have been put up for sale recently.
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