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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 10, 1995
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:Jacob B. Davis, Law Offices of Lechowicz & Davis, Glen Burnie: Respecting your observation that Clinton gets no credit for the recovery in the American economy, the answer is quite simple. He had nothing to do with it!In fact, if the legislation he proposed shortly after his election had been enacted, the economy would have been worse not better.There is something in our economy called a "business cycle." President Bush had the misfortune of running for president when the cycle was in a downturn.
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NEWS
September 13, 2011
It's become rather in vogue these days to throw 20th century economist John Maynard Keynes under the bus for "cluelessly" suggesting that fiscal stimulus is a good countermeasure to recessions and depressions. Problem is, we're blaming Keynes for stimulus not working on our current balance sheet recession - where previously high levels of borrowing to buy "malinvestments" that will never pay for themselves has left us somewhat broke - when all Keynes ever claimed was that stimulus was appropriate during a business cycle recession.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
It's 3 p.m. on a Friday, and Home Paramount Pest Control in Harford County is running low on office supplies.Vice President Nancy Tilley faxes an order: four bottles of correction fluid, 200 clasp envelopes, eight boxes of file folders, seven boxes of fax paper and a package of sticky yellow Post-it sheets.Forty miles away, at Office Depot Inc.'s big warehouse in Savage, the order lands on Melanie Hancock's desk. She types it into Office Depot's computer.She pushes the tan "Enter" button, prompting a complex, computerized chain reaction that ripples through the warehouse and beyond.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | February 10, 2008
Are we in a recession or not? For a person simply focused on keeping a job, the distinction between a slowing economy and the beginning of a recession might not matter much. Whether the economy is just weak or in a recession, the risk of losing a job builds. And, of course, the longer and deeper the economic downturn lasts, the greater the risk becomes. For investors, however, there is a reason for the current preoccupation with identifying a specific time when the economy did, or might, enter a recession.
NEWS
September 13, 2011
It's become rather in vogue these days to throw 20th century economist John Maynard Keynes under the bus for "cluelessly" suggesting that fiscal stimulus is a good countermeasure to recessions and depressions. Problem is, we're blaming Keynes for stimulus not working on our current balance sheet recession - where previously high levels of borrowing to buy "malinvestments" that will never pay for themselves has left us somewhat broke - when all Keynes ever claimed was that stimulus was appropriate during a business cycle recession.
BUSINESS
By Teresa McUsic and Teresa McUsic,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | April 17, 1994
Economists have been influential advisers to the federal government since the days of Franklin Roosevelt, but critics have long wondered if their theories helped the nation and if their predictions of economic change have proved correct.Alfred Malabre Jr. says no in both cases in his new book, "Lost Prophets: An Insider's History of the Modern Economists" (Harvard Business School Press, $27.95).Mr. Malabre is economics editor of the Wall Street Journal and has had a long career in "economist watching" in both government and business.
NEWS
February 14, 1995
Not content to let the Republicans win the irresponsibility prize with their unanimous support of the so-called Balanced Budget Amendment, Senate Democrats have come up with a legislative snake that would do them one better. Their proposal would exempt Social Security from the cost-cutting that allegedly would ensue once the constitutional amendment is adopted.This Democratic gimmick is not intended to be taken seriously. Its purpose is to load up the Balanced Budget Amendment with an objective so contradictory to its stated purpose that even its supporters would flee in panic.
NEWS
By Kevin Phillips | August 4, 1999
THE UNITED States is approaching the millennium with a lotus-eating culture and electronic commerce that some insist have banished the bad old business downturn.But what if we are actually living in America's first major example of an aging economic cycle on the financial steroids of a "wealth effect?"Then today's tax-cut drum beaters would be wrong about a new plateau of prosperity. The next business cycle and politics could easily bring the reverse of today's giddiness: an "unwealth effect" in which consumer spending contracts as paper affluence shrinks.
NEWS
March 17, 1995
Republican members of Congress have described their welfare reform proposals as a "tough love" remedy for the excesses of government compassion. What they don't point out as readily is that some of its provisions represent tough luck for state economies as well.There are many things wrong with the current welfare system. But welfare's status as an "entitlement" for those who qualify is not the problem. It is how these entitlements are calculated and NTC implemented. Entitlement is what makes welfare a safety net, not just for poor families, but also for the states and communities in which they live and spend their benefits.
NEWS
By ROBERT RENO | May 5, 1994
Major American corporations are laying off workers at the rate of better than 3,000 a month.This butchery of the corporate work force is unprecedented in recent history, unheard of in a period of unmistakable economic recovery and steeply rising profits, and is proceeding at a faster pace than it was a year ago when the recovery was still a far more uncertain thing.Other than this anomaly, which represents financial disaster for thousands of American households and stressful anxiety for thousands of others still awaiting the ax, everything is fine.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS | January 1, 2006
Contrarians are prized on Wall Street. And following the consensus is considered a setup for shocks that can damage well-laid investment plans. But as strategists assembled their forecasts for 2006 during the past few weeks, they have been sounding surprisingly similar. Most are predicting another year of modest stock market gains; not unlike 2005's 6 percent increase in the Standard & Poor's 500 index. And strategists remain leery of many of the same factors that loomed over the markets this year: rising interest rates, high energy and commodity prices, overextended consumers, a possible housing bubble, U.S. budget and trade deficits and slowing corporate profits.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
For most of the past 20 years, sharks have been the biggest stars in the on-air firmament at the Silver Spring-based Discovery Channel. But it's hard to slap advertisements on said man-eaters, and they don't give the best speeches either, so in an effort to raise its global profile, the cable network is sponsoring a predator of a different sort - one Lance Armstrong. The company has never linked itself so publicly with one person, much less an athlete. And few, if any, television networks have thrown their lots so clearly with individual sports stars.
BUSINESS
By Nicholas Riccardi and Nicholas Riccardi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 27, 2005
Carlton Guthrie sees bright times ahead. After weathering the 2001 recession, his manufacturing company has made enough money to pay off some debts and position itself to expand. But he's not planning to add jobs. "I don't see us hiring anytime soon," said Guthrie, co-chairman of Detroit Chassis, which makes chassis for motor homes. "I see a tremendous amount of room for us becoming more efficient." Guthrie's ability to expand his business without enlarging the payroll helps explain why job creation continues to be sluggish while the economy appears to be booming.
BUSINESS
By Karen Robinson-Jacobs and Karen Robinson-Jacobs,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2003
With much of the steam out of the refinancing market, the mortgage financing industry is bracing for widespread layoffs. Two of the biggest home-loan providers - Washington Mutual Inc. and Countrywide Financial Corp. - have cut more than 6,500 jobs in recent months. And lenders are preparing to cut thousands more jobs during the coming months. In all, about 65,000 people employed at companies specializing in mortgage lending will probably lose their jobs during the next 12 months, says the national Mortgage Bankers Association.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2002
The stock market is plummeting and Democratic candidates are letting the voters know that the rich and greedy businessmen - the friends of the Republicans - are to blame. That might sound like today's headline, but it was also the story 70 years ago. The candidate was Franklin D. Roosevelt. The man playing the part of Enron's Kenneth Lay or the Arthur Andersen accountants or the WorldCom executives was Samuel Insull. He had made his millions in electric utilities in Chicago only to take thousands of stockholders down with him when the Depression collapsed his financial house of cards.
NEWS
By Kevin Phillips | August 4, 1999
THE UNITED States is approaching the millennium with a lotus-eating culture and electronic commerce that some insist have banished the bad old business downturn.But what if we are actually living in America's first major example of an aging economic cycle on the financial steroids of a "wealth effect?"Then today's tax-cut drum beaters would be wrong about a new plateau of prosperity. The next business cycle and politics could easily bring the reverse of today's giddiness: an "unwealth effect" in which consumer spending contracts as paper affluence shrinks.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry | December 13, 1998
ASIAN MARKETS have rallied in recent months amid optimism that the economic crisis is easing. Last week South Korea announced that it was immediately repaying nearly $3 billion in emergency loans that kept it afloat last year, and China successfully raised $1 billion from foreign investors -- both indicators that investors take into account in deciding when a panic is over. But the U.S. ambassador to Singapore, Steven Green, also warned last week: "I see no fundamental change in Asia over the past 90 days to justify a sustained rally in the financial markets, much less to sustain economic growth in the years ahead."
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera | May 16, 1999
PRODUCTIVITY -- a measure of output per worker per hour -- increased an unexpectedly strong 4 percent in the first quarter, a good sign that inflation will remain tame. That's because when workers produce more goods and services per hour, it gives businesses a competitive edge and enables them to keep prices lower. It also lets firms raise wages without cutting into profits.What is responsible for the rise? New technology? Better worker training? Can it be sustained?David BersonVice president and chief economist, Fannie MaeTwo things are pushing productivity.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera | May 16, 1999
PRODUCTIVITY -- a measure of output per worker per hour -- increased an unexpectedly strong 4 percent in the first quarter, a good sign that inflation will remain tame. That's because when workers produce more goods and services per hour, it gives businesses a competitive edge and enables them to keep prices lower. It also lets firms raise wages without cutting into profits.What is responsible for the rise? New technology? Better worker training? Can it be sustained?David BersonVice president and chief economist, Fannie MaeTwo things are pushing productivity.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry | December 13, 1998
ASIAN MARKETS have rallied in recent months amid optimism that the economic crisis is easing. Last week South Korea announced that it was immediately repaying nearly $3 billion in emergency loans that kept it afloat last year, and China successfully raised $1 billion from foreign investors -- both indicators that investors take into account in deciding when a panic is over. But the U.S. ambassador to Singapore, Steven Green, also warned last week: "I see no fundamental change in Asia over the past 90 days to justify a sustained rally in the financial markets, much less to sustain economic growth in the years ahead."
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