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By Leslie Cauley | June 26, 1991
Long Distance Service of Washington Inc., a reseller of long-distance services that does business in Maryland, was raided earlier this month by federal authorities as part of an investigation into allegations that it has been padding customer bills, the FBI confirmed yesterday.James Mull, an FBI spokesman in Washington, said that the search of LDS' headquarters in McLean, Va., was conducted June 11 in cooperation with the U.S. attorney's s office in Alexandria.He confirmed that the search was related to allegations that LDS was padding the bills of its business customers, but he declined to elaborate.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. asked Friday for a monthly surcharge on gas customers to cover part of the cost of replacing old pipes, a request that comes in addition to the rate increase and electric surcharge it is seeking. BGE said it asked state regulators for permission to charge residential gas customers 32 cents a month and business customers $1.87 a month, starting in February. The utility intends to ask for higher monthly surcharges in each of the following four years — effectively topping out at $2 for residents and $11.55 for businesses, though some of that amount ultimately could be pushed into base rates.
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 1997
AT&T Corp. announced its first significant foray into the local telephone business yesterday, but the modest scope of its two new services underscored that AT&T was tiptoeing into this $100 billion market, even a year after it was thrown open to competition.Starting Feb. 3, AT&T said it would offer local phone service to small- and medium-size business customers in California. The long-distance carrier will not build its own local operations, but will lease lines on the existing local network of Pacific Telesis Group.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
A report late Wednesday that a top-secret court authorized the National Security Agency to collect the telephone records of millions of Verizon customers should raise serious concerns about the scope of the Obama administration's domestic surveillance program and the threat it poses to citizens' privacy. The fact that the government can secretly order communications firms to turn over massive amounts of potentially sensitive information about customers without their knowledge calls into question the administration's commitment to transparency and the ability of the special court charged with overseeing such requests to protect citizens' rights.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- MCI Communications Corp. plans to establish a full range of local telephone services to business customers in Baltimore and nine other big cities by the end of this year, in what will be the biggest assault yet by a long-distance company on the local Bell companies.MCI, based in Washington, said its primary focus would be on business rather than residential customers, at least initially. Smaller companies that have offered such services have been able to offer business customers sharply lower rates.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley zHC BRB | August 6, 1991
Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. now wants to do for businesses with centrex systems what it does for residential customers: Give them a way to peek at the numbers of incoming calls.Under a C&P plan submitted to the Public Service Commission last week, any business with three or more lines could buy Caller ID.The controversial service, which permits users to obtain the numbers of incoming calls, has been available in Maryland since October 1989.To avoid detection by Caller ID, callers must dial the code "star-6-7" before placing a call.
BUSINESS
By Jon Van and Jon Van,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 2, 2003
When cell-phone customers can keep their numbers despite changing carriers, expect a herd of users to switch providers. But the loudest roar is likely to come from business users with corporate accounts. The new rules allowing for "number portability" will lead to fat discounts and shifting control of cell phones used for business, industry insiders predict. "It will turn the wireless world upside down," said Susan Cheney, Midwest vice president for Sprint PCS. Wireless, not surprisingly, continues to gain in popularity among business customers, yet companies have been slow to get a handle on this growing expense, said Greg Carr, chief executive of Teldata Control Inc., a company that advises businesses on telecommunications service purchases.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | February 21, 2007
Deborah Bryan Sales and service associate U.S. Postal Service, Woodstock Salary --$45,000 Age --41 Years on the job --18 How she got started --After graduating from Towson University with a degree in business administration, Bryan went to work at the post office. For the first 15 years she worked in the back, getting mail ready for carriers to deliver. Not quite three years ago, she switched to working the front window at the Woodstock branch. She's currently on a temporary reassignment, working out of the main branch of the Baltimore post office assisting business customers.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
U.S. Foodservice Inc., the Columbia-based institutional food supplier, is expected to announce today a Web site that will handle orders from hotels, restaurants and other business customers who need kitchenware and gourmet food items.The company joins a growing list of corporations that are turning to the Internet to streamline sales and distribution, manage inventory and trim operating costs.U.S. Foodservice, which earned $83 million on $6.2 billion in sales in its last fiscal year, initially plans to offer 5,000 items on its Next Day Gourmet Web site.
NEWS
May 2, 1994
The unraveling of what was for decades a monolithic telephone industry continues. The heirs of Ma Bell, the old AT&T, now face competition in their local bailiwicks as well as the sharing of long-distance service imposed on them in the '80s. The decision by the Maryland Public Service Commission to permit a relative newcomer to provide businesses with local telephone services is but a harbinger of the communications revolution soon to come.MFS Intelenet, which previously offered only long-distance services, will be a smaller competitor of Bell Atlantic-Maryland, the renamed C&P Telephone Company.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
As many as 300 Verizon customers in West Baltimore lost service Thursday after cables were cut, the company said. The outage to telephone and DSL service affected state government offices, small businesses and residents, Verizon spokeswoman Sandra Arnette said. Service was expected to be restored by midday Friday, she said. Arnette said the damage to equipment in an alley off West North Avenue near Pennsylvania Avenue was the first act of vandalism reported in Baltimore since Sunday, Aug. 7, when members of the Communications Workers of America and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers began a strike after their contract expired, she said.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | November 21, 2009
Critics of a revised settlement agreement that would resolve outstanding issues with Verizon say state regulators should not deregulate any telephone services. "Maryland can do better than this deal with Verizon," said Rion Dennis, political director of Progressive Maryland. The original agreement was negotiated by Verizon, the staff of the Maryland Public Service Commission and the Office of the People's Counsel, which represents consumers. It tackled several concerns before the commissioners, including complaints from customers who were left without service for long periods and the prices that consumers pay to maintain local calling rates to a different geographical area.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | December 30, 2007
Going-out-of-business sales can seem like a bonanza. But before you pounce on tantalizing merchandise at post-holiday liquidation sales, realize that those marked-down goodies can come with some major limitations. Furthermore, realize that the decision to do business with a business that's not planning on being around for long is very risky business. As Steve Hannan, executive director of the Maryland Consumer Rights Coalition, said of buying from insolvent companies, "You've got to be a gambling man to do that."
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,SUN REPORTER | November 8, 2007
In a move to expand its share of business travelers, Southwest Airlines yesterday said it would begin selling a premium fare that guarantees buyers will be among the first to board the plane. The early boarding privilege will also be extended to passengers who fly at least 32 flights a year on the airline. A round trip counts as two flights. "We're simply offering business travelers more reasons to choose Southwest," Chief Executive Officer Gary Kelly said. "It will knock down some hurdles and hopefully gain us a lot more passengers."
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | February 21, 2007
Deborah Bryan Sales and service associate U.S. Postal Service, Woodstock Salary --$45,000 Age --41 Years on the job --18 How she got started --After graduating from Towson University with a degree in business administration, Bryan went to work at the post office. For the first 15 years she worked in the back, getting mail ready for carriers to deliver. Not quite three years ago, she switched to working the front window at the Woodstock branch. She's currently on a temporary reassignment, working out of the main branch of the Baltimore post office assisting business customers.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
The proposed $71 billion merger between Sprint Corp. and Nextel Communications will create the third-largest wireless carrier in the country with the expanded ability to offer digital service in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. That's the good news. What the 40 million customers of the newly combined telecom titan want to know even more is: What's the bad news? That's hard to answer at this early stage, consumer experts and industry analysts said yesterday. If carried out well, the transition period to create the new Sprint Nextel should have little to no negative effect on customers, the experts said.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1998
Maryland utility regulators have approved Allegheny Energy Inc.'s planned acquisition of Pittsburgh's DQE Inc.But the $2.6 billion deal remains stuck in Pennsylvania, where two administrative law judges on Wednesday recommended an 18-month postponement for further study of the agreement's impact on electricity competition.The Pennsylvania's Public Utility Commission will consider the judges' recommendations, and a final decision is expected in late May. The companies had hoped to complete the deal by May 1.Allegheny Energy serves 1.4 million residential and business customers in Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia and Ohio.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | September 27, 1994
The average Potomac Edison customer will see a $3.71 rate increase on the November utility bill, rather than the $8.63 requested in April, company officials said yesterday.Potomac Edison, which serves about 9,400 customers in Carroll County, has said a residential customer who uses 1,000 kilowatts of energy a month will now pay $74.46 each month rather than $70.75.Company officials won the increase -- the fifth requested this year -- by arguing that it was necessary to help pay for a scrubber system on its coal-burning power stations in West Virginia.
BUSINESS
By Jon Van and Jon Van,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 2, 2003
When cell-phone customers can keep their numbers despite changing carriers, expect a herd of users to switch providers. But the loudest roar is likely to come from business users with corporate accounts. The new rules allowing for "number portability" will lead to fat discounts and shifting control of cell phones used for business, industry insiders predict. "It will turn the wireless world upside down," said Susan Cheney, Midwest vice president for Sprint PCS. Wireless, not surprisingly, continues to gain in popularity among business customers, yet companies have been slow to get a handle on this growing expense, said Greg Carr, chief executive of Teldata Control Inc., a company that advises businesses on telecommunications service purchases.
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