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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
This month, 900 Strayer University students walked across the stage at 1st Mariner Arena during a regional commencement ceremony in which they were awarded bachelor's degrees from an institution whose Baltimore roots date to the late 19th century. Strayer's Business College began in Baltimore in 1892 as the brainchild of Seibert Irving Strayer, a Bucknell University graduate who was a writer and shorthand innovator. In 1902, he was joined by Thomas W. Donoho, a former manager of a typewriter company and a lawyer who later headed the Baltimore school.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
- Three University of Maryland students crossed U.S. 1 this weekend, hours after a fatal hit-and-run on the same stretch of road. The students said they know jaywalking on the major thoroughfare is dangerous - three people have been struck and killed by drivers there in the past six months - but they said they've become accustomed to drivers yielding to them on campus. "Because on campus the cars have to stop for you, we all are so used to it," said Elizabeth Steidl. "So we just walk wherever we want.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 3, 2011
Rose Helen O'Doherty, an accomplished golfer and family matriarch, died of pneumonia April 18 at Howard County General Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 82. Born Rose Helen Huggins in Baltimore, she was raised on North Monroe Street and attended St. Gregory's School. She was a 1946 Western High School graduate. While attending a local business college, she met her future husband, Patrick Anthony O'Doherty, a trial attorney. They lived in Irvington and later in an old home called Maple Lodge in the Paradise section of Catonsville.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Elaine F. Wood, a retired Baltimore County Health Department secretary and World War II veteran, died Tuesday of dysphagia, a swallowing disorder, at her Towson home. She was 98. The daughter of Wesley Fennell, a salesman, and Frances Letetia Stocksdale Fennell, a homemaker, Elaine Fennell was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. After graduating in 1933 from Forest Park High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1937 from what was then Western Maryland College. She also studied at Strayer's Business College in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1998
Bill Sire's mantra regarding See Your Point, the probable favorite in today's Maryland Racing Writers' Handicap at Laurel Park, is: "The best $4,000 I ever spent. The best $4,000 I ever spent."A trainer based at Bowie, Sire bought See Your Point sight unseen five years ago when she was a yearling. He had attended business college for three years; he can analyze the numbers.A racehorse purchased for $4,000 has earned $241,686 -- and runs today for $30,000 more. That's a mighty good deal, and you don't have to be a business major to figure it out."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Elaine F. Wood, a retired Baltimore County Health Department secretary and World War II veteran, died Tuesday of dysphagia, a swallowing disorder, at her Towson home. She was 98. The daughter of Wesley Fennell, a salesman, and Frances Letetia Stocksdale Fennell, a homemaker, Elaine Fennell was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. After graduating in 1933 from Forest Park High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1937 from what was then Western Maryland College. She also studied at Strayer's Business College in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Alice E. Krupsaw, a retired federal worker who found joy in creative and artistic endeavors, died Dec. 16 of undetermined causes at the Milford Manor Nursing Home in Pikesville. She was 106. Alice Ettlin was born in Washington, the oldest of three children of Jewish immigrants from the Ukraine. Her father, Louis Ettlin, was a tailor, and her mother, Ida Ettlin, was a homemaker. In "An Even 100," a volume of her writing published for her centennial birthday in 2007, Mrs. Krupsaw recalled growing up in "Little Israel" on Eagle Street and then on Monroe Street.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
Roberta "Bobbie" Harrison, matriarch of a celebrated Tilghman Island business that includes a restaurant, inn, charter fishing fleet and seafood operations, died of cancer complications Monday at Memorial Hospital in Easton. She was 74 and lived in Tilghman. Born Roberta Katharine Lambdin in Baltimore and raised on Fayette Street, she moved with her parents to a Talbot County farm in McDaniel as a 7-year-old. Her father, Robert Preston Lambdin, was a boat builder and farmer who was associated with the old Claiborne ferry, which carried autos and passengers before the construction of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2011
Brice R. Phillips, the patriarch of a Maryland seafood empire that began 55 years ago with a simple crab shack in Ocean City/, died Friday at his home in the seaside resort town. Mr. Phillips, who was 90, had been in declining health. The cause of death has not yet been determined. The family business now includes 19 Phillips restaurants, along with a line of retail products sold under the Phillips Seafood name and seafood products for the food service industry. Mr. Phillips, who co-founded the restaurant business with his wife of 68 years, Shirley, remained closely associated with the company even after handing day-to-day responsibilities to a son, Stephen B. Phillips of Annapolis, in the mid-1990s.
NEWS
By Ronald J. Volpe | September 3, 2013
President Barack Obama has now joined the chorus of critics who assert that higher education in this country is too expensive, graduates are leaving college with unreasonable debt, and colleges should be graded on measures and scales developed by the federal government. They couldn't be more wrong. Affordability, quality and accountability are important issues that all institutions of higher education have been addressing for years and welcome the opportunity to further discuss them with the president.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Alice E. Krupsaw, a retired federal worker who found joy in creative and artistic endeavors, died Dec. 16 of undetermined causes at the Milford Manor Nursing Home in Pikesville. She was 106. Alice Ettlin was born in Washington, the oldest of three children of Jewish immigrants from the Ukraine. Her father, Louis Ettlin, was a tailor, and her mother, Ida Ettlin, was a homemaker. In "An Even 100," a volume of her writing published for her centennial birthday in 2007, Mrs. Krupsaw recalled growing up in "Little Israel" on Eagle Street and then on Monroe Street.
NEWS
By Ronald J. Volpe | September 3, 2013
President Barack Obama has now joined the chorus of critics who assert that higher education in this country is too expensive, graduates are leaving college with unreasonable debt, and colleges should be graded on measures and scales developed by the federal government. They couldn't be more wrong. Affordability, quality and accountability are important issues that all institutions of higher education have been addressing for years and welcome the opportunity to further discuss them with the president.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
This month, 900 Strayer University students walked across the stage at 1st Mariner Arena during a regional commencement ceremony in which they were awarded bachelor's degrees from an institution whose Baltimore roots date to the late 19th century. Strayer's Business College began in Baltimore in 1892 as the brainchild of Seibert Irving Strayer, a Bucknell University graduate who was a writer and shorthand innovator. In 1902, he was joined by Thomas W. Donoho, a former manager of a typewriter company and a lawyer who later headed the Baltimore school.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
Roberta "Bobbie" Harrison, matriarch of a celebrated Tilghman Island business that includes a restaurant, inn, charter fishing fleet and seafood operations, died of cancer complications Monday at Memorial Hospital in Easton. She was 74 and lived in Tilghman. Born Roberta Katharine Lambdin in Baltimore and raised on Fayette Street, she moved with her parents to a Talbot County farm in McDaniel as a 7-year-old. Her father, Robert Preston Lambdin, was a boat builder and farmer who was associated with the old Claiborne ferry, which carried autos and passengers before the construction of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2011
Brice R. Phillips, the patriarch of a Maryland seafood empire that began 55 years ago with a simple crab shack in Ocean City/, died Friday at his home in the seaside resort town. Mr. Phillips, who was 90, had been in declining health. The cause of death has not yet been determined. The family business now includes 19 Phillips restaurants, along with a line of retail products sold under the Phillips Seafood name and seafood products for the food service industry. Mr. Phillips, who co-founded the restaurant business with his wife of 68 years, Shirley, remained closely associated with the company even after handing day-to-day responsibilities to a son, Stephen B. Phillips of Annapolis, in the mid-1990s.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 3, 2011
Rose Helen O'Doherty, an accomplished golfer and family matriarch, died of pneumonia April 18 at Howard County General Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 82. Born Rose Helen Huggins in Baltimore, she was raised on North Monroe Street and attended St. Gregory's School. She was a 1946 Western High School graduate. While attending a local business college, she met her future husband, Patrick Anthony O'Doherty, a trial attorney. They lived in Irvington and later in an old home called Maple Lodge in the Paradise section of Catonsville.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
- Three University of Maryland students crossed U.S. 1 this weekend, hours after a fatal hit-and-run on the same stretch of road. The students said they know jaywalking on the major thoroughfare is dangerous - three people have been struck and killed by drivers there in the past six months - but they said they've become accustomed to drivers yielding to them on campus. "Because on campus the cars have to stop for you, we all are so used to it," said Elizabeth Steidl. "So we just walk wherever we want.
NEWS
By CHRIS MERL and CHRIS MERL,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
This is a stressful time for college-bound high school seniors. With everything else going on in their lives - daily course work, extracurricular activities and part-time jobs - many struggle to find the time to complete their college applications. They are not alone. Time is running out, as well, for high school guidance counselors, whose job it is to steer students in the right direction as they finalize the college application process. "I feel a lot more pressure," said Atholton High School guidance counselor Ingrid Morton.
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