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NEWS
November 7, 2013
Iowa has a lower cost of living than Maryland and a more business-friendly environment, says a senior vice president of Fidelity ( "Fidelity & Guaranty Life Insurance Co. moving headquarters to Iowa," Nov. 4). But will that mean anything to Gov. Martin O'Malley, House Speaker Michael E. Busch or Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Maryland's champions of higher taxes at any cost? It hasn't in the past so there's no reason to believe that it will now. Let Fidelity eat cake is the mantra of Maryland.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
When it comes to picking their next state senator, many Harford County voters will choose between two familiar names. The Democrat is Mary-Dulany James, a four-term state delegate whose father, William S. James, was a Maryland Senate president. The Republican is Bob Cassilly, who served on Bel Air's board of town commissioners and on the Harford County Council — and whose two brothers are also running for office in Harford this year. Both James and Cassilly believe they have the experience and vision to represent Harford's interests in Annapolis, replacing Nancy Jacobs, a Republican who is retiring after 16 years in the Senate.
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NEWS
May 11, 2013
Dan Rodricks ' advice that "complaining CEOs need to take a hike" (May 9) comes a bit late. For the first time anyone can recall, this year's Fortune 500 includes zero Baltimore-based companies. We are now the largest U.S. city without a single corporate headquarters, and there are only four left in the state - down from 11 as recently as 2007. Clearly, those who decide where to create local job opportunities (and, let's not forget, lead many philanthropic efforts) have been taking a hike for many years, just as over 300,000 Baltimore residents voted with their feet over the decades and fled the city's high property taxes, incredible shrinking economy and dismal provision of public services.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When Republican Larry Hogan and Democrat Anthony G. Brown discuss the business climate in Maryland, it seems as if the gubernatorial rivals are talking about two different states. Hogan's Maryland is a terrible place to do business, a state where companies and residents are streaming for the borders to escape oppressive taxation and capricious regulations. His remedy: tax and spending cuts coupled with business-friendly appointments to regulatory agencies. Brown's Maryland is the state with the highest household median income and a blue-chip AAA bond rating, where top-quality educational resources and strategic investments fuel the nation's No. 1 entrepreneurial culture.
NEWS
December 7, 2013
I was pleased to see that the mayor's office is concerned about Baltimore's climate for investment and economic growth ( "City to study ways to improve Baltimore economic and business climate Dec. 3). I am certain the consultant will have suggestions that are worth $167,500. But I would like to suggest that the mayor meet first with Professor Stephen Walters, a talented economist at Loyola University and the John Hopkins University Institute for Applied Economics. Professor Walters has studied the Baltimore problem and has some excellent ideas.
NEWS
October 24, 2011
Northrop Grumman Corp.'s plan to cut 800 jobs from its Linthicum-based Electronics Systems division is just another example in a long line of business decisions resulting from the manifest anti-business sentiment in Annapolis. Northrop Grumman is the largest private employer in Anne Arundel County but only the third largest employer overall. Guess who are 1 and 2? As long as we continue to allow government, which advises, regulates, and plans and produces absolutely nothing, to interfere more and more in the sectors that actually produce jobs and economic growth, we can expect more of the same - businesses high-tailing it for friendlier environs.
NEWS
By David Wilson | February 3, 2014
About six months ago, New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, speaking at the Maryland Competitiveness Coalition's Economic Summit, was asked how Maryland could position itself to compete in this fast-paced global economy. Mr. Freidman's view was that the state and its anchor institutions needed to start with a compelling economic vision that would have appeal to investors around the world - a vision with the same cachet as those in the Silicon Valley, along Route 128 outside Boston or in North Carolina's Research Triangle.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Nearly 400 people packed a conference room Thursday to hear conservative leaders argue that Maryland is in critical need of a better business climate as big federal spending cuts loom. Change Maryland, a group started by a businessman who contemplated a run against Gov. Martin O'Malley in 2010, timed its first event well. The day before, the Pentagon warned that it would be forced to furlough most of its civilian defense employees, including 45,000 in Maryland, one day a week if the federal "sequestration" budget cuts begin March 1. State Del. Steven R. Schuh, an Anne Arundel County Republican, told the crowd at the Westin Annapolis hotel that Maryland has reaped years of benefits from high levels of federal employment and contracting, "but this policy of extreme dependence on federal spending has consequences.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Announcing their first-ever joint agenda, the Democratic leaders of the General Assembly said Friday they will work together to pass legislation aimed at improving Maryland's business climate and boosting the state's economy. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch released a list of proposals they'll push during this election-year session - a mix of tax credits, tax cuts and spending to bolster the state's research universities, expand its cybersecurity industry and lure high-tech entrepreneurs to Maryland.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | December 14, 1994
Jim Brady looks at the state's business climate, and he doesn't like what he sees. But he's been given a rare opportunity to do something about it."Economic development is the greatest need in this state and is the area where we can make the biggest difference early on," said James T. Brady, co-chairman of Governor-elect Parris N. Glendening's transition team.Maryland needs to "make the business community a stakeholder in economic development" and "address its reputation as a state that is not pro-business," added Mr. Brady, the Baltimore managing partner of Arthur Andersen & Co., the international accounting house who will serve with the governor-elect's wife, Frances Hughes Glendening, to help shape the new administration.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
In their only scheduled debate on Baltimore television, the four Republican candidates for governor depicted Maryland as overtaxed and overspent under a Democratic administration, creating a climate in which businesses are fleeing to neighboring states. In the debate, taped Monday afternoon for broadcast Friday, David R. Craig, Ron George, Larry Hogan and Charles Lollar offered a grim assessment of the state's economic outlook as the second and final term of Gov. Martin O'Malley comes to an end. "Businesses are leaving in droves - to go to Virginia, to Delaware, to West Virginia, to other states," said Hogan, 58, a former Ehrlich administration official, who said the state's "onerous" tax policy is to blame.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, who briefly considered running for governor himself last year, endorsed Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown for the job on Tuesday. The Baltimore County Democrat was one of the last holdouts in the congressional delegation to pick a candidate, along with Reps. Chris Van Hollen and John Delaney, both of Montgomery County. The other six Democrats in the state's congressional delegation are backing Brown. "Lt. Gov. Brown has demonstrated a commitment to building a business climate that attracts, retains, and grows business in the 2nd Congressional District, and he has a plan to continue that success across our entire state," Ruppersberger said in a statement.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Democrat Anthony G. Brown's campaign calls his new 30-second television spot "Not About the Numbers. " The ad lives up to its title by offering no statistics, just broad generalities about Maryland's economy. What the ad says: The ad opens with a shot of Baltimore's Inner Harbor and a Hyattsville streetscape. Brown says, "This is a great state, and it should be great for every family, in every community. " It shifts to a scene of Brown and a man who appears to be the owner of a bicycle shop.
BUSINESS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
As Maryland looks to re-energize its economy amid federal budget cuts and slow growth in the aftermath of the recession, the three Democrats vying to be the next governor each developed distinct - and detailed - plans for how to improve Maryland's business climate and promote job creation. The party's dominance in state politics means that whomever emerges from next month's primary will be favored to win the general election, but several economists said none of the candidates' plans would provide a silver-bullet solution to the state's economic woes.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 10, 2014
With one debate down and six weeks to go until Maryland's primary election, the political narrative in the governor's race sounds something like this: Neither Attorney General Doug Gansler nor Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown is dazzling Democratic voters; Heather Mizeur, the party's other candidate, seems to have real grass-roots support, but still must convince moderates she can win a statewide election against a Republican. Of course, conventional wisdom says the Democratic governor's race is Brown's to lose.
NEWS
By Larry Hogan | April 11, 2014
Few things surprise me anymore, especially when it comes to our leaders in Annapolis. Still, the brazenness demonstrated this legislative session by politicians seeking to recast themselves as "pro-business" after years of supporting anti-business policies is downright amazing. It started back in January, which Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch unveiled their "Joint Legislative Business and Economic Development Agenda" for the 2014 session of the Maryland General Assembly.
BUSINESS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer Sun Staff Writer John E. Woodruff contributed to this article | November 1, 1994
This is the final article in a three-part series on Maryland's economy and the difficulties the state faces in attracting business. Today, the views of the two major gubernatorial candidates are presented.Democrat Parris N. Glendening and Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey see eye to eye on very little, but they agree the business climate in Maryland is in trouble.Mrs. Sauerbrey blames a state government that "treats business as a problem to be solved rather than the horse that pulls the wagon."
NEWS
March 22, 2014
Donald Fry, president and CEO of the Greater Baltimore Committee, recently wrote that the Baltimore City Council's attempt to pass "Ban the Box" was misguided ( "'Ban the Box' law is wrong approach," March 19). "Ban the Box" is a national movement to introduce common-sense policies regarding the use of criminal records on employment applications. Since Mr. Fry's organization is primarily supported by business, it is understandable that he would write such a one-sided letter supporting the short-sighted views of a minority of the Maryland community.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Lt. Gov.  Anthony G. Brown released an eight-point plan Wednesday that he said will increase the number of minority-owned businesses that win state contracts. Maryland already has one of the highest goals in the nation to award state business to companies owned and operated by women and minorities, firms that have traditionally struggled to land such contracts. Brown's plan, which is part of his bid for governor, suggests making it easier for businesses to get the certification required to compete for those contracts, as well as create new programs that encourage private companies to hire firms minority owned contracts.
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