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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2011
A company planning to open dozens of passenger lounges at airports around the world will open its first facility, Airspace Lounge, in May at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The lounge, to be located at BWI's concourse D, will offer passengers of any airline food, snacks, coffee, wireless Internet, on-site computers and access to a cash bar for a day pass starting at $17.50. The concourse currently serves AirTran, Cape Air, Continental, United and US Airways.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Technology company Hope LoanPort could have signed a conventional lease for its new headquarters in Baltimore. But the nonprofit doesn't work in a conventional way. Its 10 employees live in three states. Some work at home part-time but need office space to meet with clients or review documents. Sometimes a few employees need to meet in an office to work on a presentation. And the company's growth makes it difficult to gauge when it will need more space or how much more. Hope chose a relatively new but growing option, a "flexible workplace" center.
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BUSINESS
By Mensah Dean and Mensah Dean,Staff Writer | July 24, 1992
The Baltimore area's Minority Business Development Center is moving -- literally -- to develop a higher profile.A new downtown location will be more convenient and will provide greater access to clients, the center's officials say. And the new manager, Arthur Petersen, Jr., hopes to boost the number of clients by about 25 percent.The federally funded program, which helps minority businesses with such issues as business planning, officially opened Wednesday at 301 N. Charles St. The center had been in the Park Circle Business Center in Northwest Baltimore since it was established in the mid-1970s.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2011
A company planning to open dozens of passenger lounges at airports around the world will open its first facility, Airspace Lounge, in May at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The lounge, to be located at BWI's concourse D, will offer passengers of any airline food, snacks, coffee, wireless Internet, on-site computers and access to a cash bar for a day pass starting at $17.50. The concourse currently serves AirTran, Cape Air, Continental, United and US Airways.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
Seeking to restore part of Baltimore's greatly diminished manufacturing base, city officials want to create an 80-acre industrial park near the Harbor Tunnel Thruway with a mix of federal, state, city and private funds.The proposed Chesapeake Business Center -- to be in the Canton Industrial Area near a major marine terminal -- would create up to 1,400 jobs in businesses that include light and heavy manufacturing as well as warehouse and distribution operations, officials said. The center would be on the site of a former Exxon Corp.
BUSINESS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1998
It is a classic lost urban landscape: acre upon acre of contaminated land, studded with rows of empty oil tanks squatting like so many alien spaceships.For a vision of what Exxon's closed distribution center in Canton can become, city officials are looking no further than the nearby Fort Holabird Industrial Park: a melange of modern plants and warehouses, with ample parking and plenty of greenery, that is virtually at capacity.As Baltimore prepares to submit next week the second of two federal grant applications for its proposed Chesapeake Business Center along Boston Street -- which would transform the forlorn Exxon property -- the city's initiative is drawing support from many area community and business leaders.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Technology company Hope LoanPort could have signed a conventional lease for its new headquarters in Baltimore. But the nonprofit doesn't work in a conventional way. Its 10 employees live in three states. Some work at home part-time but need office space to meet with clients or review documents. Sometimes a few employees need to meet in an office to work on a presentation. And the company's growth makes it difficult to gauge when it will need more space or how much more. Hope chose a relatively new but growing option, a "flexible workplace" center.
BUSINESS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | September 30, 1991
Anthony Piccinini, a longtime Baltimore land investor and developer, says he stands alone in Harford County in planning "for the little guy."Piccinini is general partner of the Forest Hill Business Center, an 81-acre business park near Bel Air that is offering lots to a variety of small business owners."
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
Westminster's planning commission has staged a symbolic protest of plans to build a state auto emissions-testing station in Carroll's air business center.The planning commission voted 4-0 Thursday to deny a request from the air business center's private owner, Westminster Business Center Limited Partnership, to reduce the size of the lot on which the station will be built. The center is east of the county airport on state Route 97.Commission members acknowledged that their action is unlikely affect state plans to build the testing station in the air business center.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | December 14, 1994
The Hampstead Town Council voted 3-2 last night to reappoint planning commission member William Drummond, who was reportedly involved in a heated discussion with a resident at a recent planning commission meeting.The two dissenting votes were cast by Councilmen Wayne H. Thomas and Dwight W. Womer. Both said they would like to see other interested residents given a chance to serve on the commission.Mr. Thomas said it appeared Mr. Drummond patterned his planning commission votes along those cast by Councilman and Planning Commission Chairman Arthur H. Moler, and suggested it might have something to do with both men's membership in a Masonic order.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
Kiesha Haughton Smoots has taught dozens of low-income women in Baltimore how to write a business plan and get their ventures off the ground. She has bid on federal contracts for a woman-owned information technology company and run her own small-business consulting firm. In Prince George's County, she helped entrepreneurs get loans, land government contracts, increase sales and create jobs. But these days, banks are less willing to lend, consumers are cutting back and many small businesses are struggling from week to week to stay afloat.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
LAKE PLACID, N.Y. -- Some days, Angela Ruggiero is a "D." Other days, she's a "C." She's even, on occasion, been an "F." Chances are the defender-center-forward on the U.S. women's hockey team would take tickets, wash uniforms or even run the Zamboni machine between periods to win another Olympic gold medal. "Yeah, there's unfinished business," Ruggiero says. It has been eight years since the U.S. women's team wore the gold and four years since dejected team members could barely stand to look at the silver medals around their necks.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 18, 2005
A decade ago, new businesses in Howard County were failing at alarming rates, although the county was one of the wealthiest areas in the nation and enjoying healthy growth. It was a chilling contrast for Richard W. Story, chief executive of the county's Economic Development Authority. He realized something was needed to improve the odds, if only slightly, for those braving the savagery of the free-market system. So he formed the Business Resource Center in Columbia, consolidating the myriad programs and services available to startups.
NEWS
By Natasha Lesser and Natasha Lesser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2004
Wanda Litch's students are having trouble with attachments. Not of the emotional sort; it's e-mail that is giving them trouble. Litch is teaching a group at the Catonsville Senior Center how to use the Internet. After a lifetime of talking on rotary telephones and sending letters, seniors are learning how to navigate the world of e-mail and instant messaging. Her students have mastered how to send e-mail. But they're having trouble with the more elaborate task of attaching files. Learning to use the Internet is one of the many activities that the county's nearly 140,000 seniors - the largest elderly population in the state, according to the county Department of Aging - are pursuing.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
Neighbors along Dorsey Road in Elkridge will meet tonight to oppose a methadone clinic that has applied to open near their homes. Residents of Scarlet Oaks, a subdivision across the street from the proposed site, say they plan to fight the clinic's opening. "We will do what it takes to have this clinic not in our neighborhood," said Lisa Sheppard, who has lived in the community almost three years. "I believe there's a better location for it - not right across the street from a residential area," she added.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2003
The former Bainbridge Naval Training Center, on a hill over looking Port Deposit, would become home to one of the nation's top business technology research centers under a proposal announced yesterday. Berkshire Laboratories, a small and little-known Columbus, Ohio-based research and development company is looking at opening a 500-acre technology center that it says could create 3,000 or more high-paying jobs at the former Navy boot camp that closed in 1976. "It is certainly a once-in-a-lifetime deal," said W. Paul Gilbert, director of the Cecil County Office of Economic Development.
NEWS
By Laurie Schwartz | November 5, 1996
IN THE past year more than 80 businesses have moved into downtown Baltimore, renewed their leases or expanded.Thousands of conventioneers have descended upon Baltimore's new Convention Center. Major attractions and cultural institutions like the National Aquarium have seen attendance rise. And health care facilities like the University of Maryland Medical System, Mercy Medical Center and Maryland General Hospital have all completed major expansions.All of this is great news for the center city, with a changing downtown becoming more than a business center but also a center of tourism, entertainment, education and health care.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1991
The Maryland Small Business Development Center ha received a $50,400 federal grant to encourage the transfer of technology to small businesses.The money was awarded by the U.S. Small Business Administration and the Commerce Department's National Institute of Standards and Technology."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2003
The state has approved $4 million for the redevelopment of the Warfield Complex, a 100-acre campus in Sykesville where the town plans to create a business and academic center. The money is in addition to $1 million Carroll County allocated to the project this year and $3.1 million the State Highway Administration will spend to build an intersection at the Route 32 entrance to the property. Sykesville plans a $20 million renovation of a dozen former state hospital buildings clustered on the property along Route 32. The $5 million will pay for the renovation of a 12,000-square-foot building, which is to serve as a model for the complex.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2003
The state has approved $4 million for the redevelopment of the Warfield Complex, a 100-acre campus in Sykesville where the town plans to create a business and academic center. The money is in addition to $1 million Carroll County allocated to the project this year and $3.1 million the State Highway Administration will spend to build an intersection at the Route 32 entrance to the property. Sykesville plans a $20 million renovation of a dozen former state hospital buildings clustered on the property along Route 32. The $5 million will pay for the complete renovation of a 12,000-square-foot building, which would serve as a model for the complex.
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