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Janell Sutherland, For The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
This week, "The Amazing Race" gives us bushmen and scorpions in Africa, which is just what we all needed, right? The first clue tells teams that they must go to the city of Maun in the Kalahari desert. They have to find out what country they're headed for before a security guard will let them into a travel agency to buy tickets.  He has one job, let him do it! The travel agency is a small place and the doors are plate glass. Basically, people on the outside can see and hear people on the inside.  The Fearless Friends check a hotel computer and discover that they are headed to Botswana.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Janell Sutherland, For The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
This week, "The Amazing Race" gives us bushmen and scorpions in Africa, which is just what we all needed, right? The first clue tells teams that they must go to the city of Maun in the Kalahari desert. They have to find out what country they're headed for before a security guard will let them into a travel agency to buy tickets.  He has one job, let him do it! The travel agency is a small place and the doors are plate glass. Basically, people on the outside can see and hear people on the inside.  The Fearless Friends check a hotel computer and discover that they are headed to Botswana.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | February 14, 1992
KAGGA KAMMA GAME RESERVE, South Africa -- About 50 bushmen have returned to the rugged land of their ancestors here, hoping to preserve prehistoric traditions and save a vanishing tribe.Dressed in antelope skins and armed with wooden bows and arrows, they hunt small game across miles of rocky terrain in the manner that bushmen hunted in this region for thousands of years.The bushmen are an oddity now in South Africa, with its modern cities and modern-day struggles for power. They are hunters and gatherers who once moved freely through the country, from the Kalahari Desert to the Cape of Good Hope.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2006
ACCRA, GHANA -- In a landmark decision, the Botswana High Court ruled yesterday that the government had acted illegally when it forcibly evicted the last tribal Bushmen living a traditional life from the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. The last 2,000 Bushmen living in the game reserve were forced out in 1997 and 2002, but yesterday's verdict centered on the latter eviction of about 1,000 people. The court - in the town of Lobatse, about 37 miles south of the capital Gaborone - ruled 2-1 in favor of the Bushmen, also finding that they had a right to hunt and gather in the reserve.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | October 6, 1996
The !Kung Bushmen of Africa's Kalahari desert are a people trapped by the myths art has created about them. Their unhappy history, and how it was shaped by a series of documentary films, is the subject of a projected PBS series now in development.In the early 1950s a young man named John Marshall traveled to the Kalahari in what was then South West Africa and began shooting what eventually would become some 1 million feet of film documenting the way of life of the indigenous desert people called !
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 20, 1996
D'KAR, Botswana -- Komtsha Komtsha pulled his jacket around him to ward off the chill winter wind that blows unchecked across the flat plains of the Kalahari Desert on its way to this settlement of Bushmen huts."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 31, 1995
KAGGA KAMMA GAME PARK, South Africa -- The prime attractions of the park appear as if from nowhere.In other game parks, you would be talking about elephants, rhinoceroses or lions. In Kagga Kamma, you are talking about Bushmen.They are the few surviving direct descendants of southern Africa's original inhabitants, people who still know the ancient skills of hunting animals and gathering plants and living off the land without destroying it.About 45 live here, and their daily encounter with tourists is undeniably affecting.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 21, 2002
METSIMANONG, Botswana - Here, deep in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, life has never been easy. Rainfall is scarce in the landscape of dry riverbeds, salt flats and barren plains. The days come to a boil under the desert sun. The nights are so cold and lonely, legend says, you can hear the stars sing. The only people who have ever learned to survive here are the Bushmen, also known as the San or Basarwa. They call themselves the "first people" because God, they say, created them before all others.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2006
ACCRA, GHANA -- In a landmark decision, the Botswana High Court ruled yesterday that the government had acted illegally when it forcibly evicted the last tribal Bushmen living a traditional life from the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. The last 2,000 Bushmen living in the game reserve were forced out in 1997 and 2002, but yesterday's verdict centered on the latter eviction of about 1,000 people. The court - in the town of Lobatse, about 37 miles south of the capital Gaborone - ruled 2-1 in favor of the Bushmen, also finding that they had a right to hunt and gather in the reserve.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2003
SCHMIDTSDRIFT, South Africa - Every morning the Bushmen living in this dreary outpost of thorn trees, tents and howling wind faithfully tune their radios to 99.4 FM. They wake up to the weather report. Not that the forecast is surprising in the desert. It's hot and sunny in the summer. It's cold and sunny in the winter. During the women's hour they get advice on raising children, taking stains out of clothing and avoiding cholera. The DJs spin a mix of ancient tribal chants, rock and South African hip-hop interrupted by town gossip, crime reports and death notices.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2003
SCHMIDTSDRIFT, South Africa - Every morning the Bushmen living in this dreary outpost of thorn trees, tents and howling wind faithfully tune their radios to 99.4 FM. They wake up to the weather report. Not that the forecast is surprising in the desert. It's hot and sunny in the summer. It's cold and sunny in the winter. During the women's hour they get advice on raising children, taking stains out of clothing and avoiding cholera. The DJs spin a mix of ancient tribal chants, rock and South African hip-hop interrupted by town gossip, crime reports and death notices.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 21, 2002
METSIMANONG, Botswana - Here, deep in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, life has never been easy. Rainfall is scarce in the landscape of dry riverbeds, salt flats and barren plains. The days come to a boil under the desert sun. The nights are so cold and lonely, legend says, you can hear the stars sing. The only people who have ever learned to survive here are the Bushmen, also known as the San or Basarwa. They call themselves the "first people" because God, they say, created them before all others.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 1, 2000
WITDRAAI, South Africa -- As the dawn of year 2000 dims the diamond-bright stars above the desert here, David Kruiper, chief of the Bushmen of the southern Kalahari, is free of millennium worries. Without a power supply to fail, a phone to go dead, a computer to crash or a bank account to freeze, this 64-year-old man of nature is immune to the threat of technological chaos. He hasn't even heard of the Y2K bug. The lines on his face deepen at mention of the possibility of the year 2000 bringing problems to the modern world.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | October 6, 1996
The !Kung Bushmen of Africa's Kalahari desert are a people trapped by the myths art has created about them. Their unhappy history, and how it was shaped by a series of documentary films, is the subject of a projected PBS series now in development.In the early 1950s a young man named John Marshall traveled to the Kalahari in what was then South West Africa and began shooting what eventually would become some 1 million feet of film documenting the way of life of the indigenous desert people called !
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 20, 1996
D'KAR, Botswana -- Komtsha Komtsha pulled his jacket around him to ward off the chill winter wind that blows unchecked across the flat plains of the Kalahari Desert on its way to this settlement of Bushmen huts."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 31, 1995
KAGGA KAMMA GAME PARK, South Africa -- The prime attractions of the park appear as if from nowhere.In other game parks, you would be talking about elephants, rhinoceroses or lions. In Kagga Kamma, you are talking about Bushmen.They are the few surviving direct descendants of southern Africa's original inhabitants, people who still know the ancient skills of hunting animals and gathering plants and living off the land without destroying it.About 45 live here, and their daily encounter with tourists is undeniably affecting.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 1, 2000
WITDRAAI, South Africa -- As the dawn of year 2000 dims the diamond-bright stars above the desert here, David Kruiper, chief of the Bushmen of the southern Kalahari, is free of millennium worries. Without a power supply to fail, a phone to go dead, a computer to crash or a bank account to freeze, this 64-year-old man of nature is immune to the threat of technological chaos. He hasn't even heard of the Y2K bug. The lines on his face deepen at mention of the possibility of the year 2000 bringing problems to the modern world.
NEWS
By Rena Singer and Rena Singer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 2000
XAKANAXA, Botswana - The last time Molly Bruce Jacobs saw her son alive, she tucked him into bed, gave him a kiss and reminded him not to leave his tent during the night. It had been a full day, their second on safari in the Moremi Wildlife Reserve. With scrub-covered islands in 1,860 square miles of swamp, the park offers visitors some of the best game-viewing opportunities in southern Africa. It had drawn Jacobs and her son Mark Garrity Shea, known as Garrit, from Stevenson in Baltimore County, full of excitement and wonder.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | February 14, 1992
KAGGA KAMMA GAME RESERVE, South Africa -- About 50 bushmen have returned to the rugged land of their ancestors here, hoping to preserve prehistoric traditions and save a vanishing tribe.Dressed in antelope skins and armed with wooden bows and arrows, they hunt small game across miles of rocky terrain in the manner that bushmen hunted in this region for thousands of years.The bushmen are an oddity now in South Africa, with its modern cities and modern-day struggles for power. They are hunters and gatherers who once moved freely through the country, from the Kalahari Desert to the Cape of Good Hope.
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