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By Robert Reno | April 15, 2001
IF IT WERE converted to the headquarters of a major U.S. corporation, would the Bush White House look any different? Certainly its dress code, conventional working hours and businesslike atmosphere make it compatible with the culture in executive suites of large companies and less like the more laid-back, intensely political mindset of the Bill Clinton White House. But do not imagine these are skin-deep differences or that they don't represent profound new friendliness to corporate interests.
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NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | June 17, 2008
WASHINGTON - A House committee subpoenaed yesterday records of the FBI's interviews with President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney during the investigation into the leak of a covert CIA officer's name. The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform demanded the documents from Attorney General Michael B. Mukasey days before former White House press secretary Scott McClellan is expected to testify about Cheney's role in leaking CIA officer Valerie Plame's identity to the news media in 2003.
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NEWS
May 25, 2001
REMEMBER these words? "No controlling legal authority." Al Gore got slammed for proffering that phrase as an excuse for the sleazy fund raising he did when he was vice president. Now, recall these words: "I don't know the man well, but I've been disappointed about how he and his administration has conducted the fund-raising affairs. You know, going to a Buddhist temple and then claiming it wasn't a fund-raiser is just not my view of responsibility." That was candidate George W. Bush, capitalizing on Mr. Gore's missteps during last year's presidential campaign.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and David Nitkin and Jill Rosen and David Nitkin,Sun reporters | May 30, 2008
With former White House press secretary Scott McClellan's book catapulting to the top of the best-seller lists - even before its official release - one might mistake him for the first loose-lipped presidential insider. Only the latest. McClellan, actually, is assuming his position in a long line of presidential aides with stories to sell, joining a bipartisan club whose recent initiates include George Stephanopoulos and Ari Fleischer. But what sets this book apart, publishing experts say, is McClellan's inner-circle access to a famously guarded administration and his surprisingly harsh testimony.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | December 6, 2002
WASHINGTON -- A former Bush administration aide has apologized for committing a Washington sin: lapsing into candor in the presence of a reporter. Candor is what comes out when you tell the truth without spin or embellishment. Too much of it can get you into trouble in the world of politics. John J. DiIulio Jr. resigned in August 2001 after about eight months as head of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, aimed at giving federal money to religious charities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul West and By Paul West,Sun Staff | January 26, 2003
The Right Man: The Surprise Presidency of George W. Bush, by David Frum. Random House. 384 pages. $25.95. Loyalty means everything to George W. Bush. He made his national political debut as the family's loyalty enforcer during his father's '88 run. When he launched his own candidacy, he forced his chief strategist, Karl Rove, to sell his political consulting business. That way, Rove could give Bush all his time (and couldn't cash in on his Bush connection). In the Bush White House, taking credit away from the president is considered disloyal.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | December 4, 1991
Washington THE RESIGNATION of White House chief of staff John Sununu, beyond satisfying his critics on Capitol Hill, clears the way for the long-delayed surfacing of President Bush's 1992 campaign team. As long as Sununu remained as the dominating Oval Office gatekeeper with a critical role in the re-election effort, internal hostolity toward him kept progress frozen.Now it is expected that the key players already widely mentioned -- headed by Detroit-based pollster-strategist Bob Teeter, Secretary of Commerce Robert Mosbacher and former Nixon White House aide Fred Malek -- will assume open direction of the campaign.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
Critics of the Iraq war often lament that the Bush White House has never been called to account for exaggerating - at best - evidence that Saddam Hussein had nuclear weapons in order to justify a pre-emptive attack against him. Yet thanks to a kind of cosmic justice, a severe penalty for that offense is now being exacted upon President Bush and his team. The indictment Friday of I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, Vice President Dick Cheney's top aide, stemmed from charges that he lied to a federal grand jury about conversations with reporters concerning the identity of a covert CIA operative.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The chief lawyer at the White House has told President Bush's aides that they may destroy telephone logs and other personal records during the transition. Congressional aides say the legal opinion will hinder their investigation of the search through Bill Clinton's passport files.Telephone calls between the State Department and the White House have emerged as a potentially valuable source of evidence for congressional investigators trying to find out whether the White House was involved in the search for information that might have damaged Mr. Clinton's presidential campaign.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
The following dialogue between Byron York of National Review and Jeff Lomonaco of the University of Minnesota on the fallout from the I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby trial originally appeared on www.latimes.com. Jeff, In the wake of the Libby guilty verdicts, many Democrats are talking about the Bush administration's finally being held accountable for lying the nation into war, and there's also talk of further "accountability" in the form of possible congressional hearings. But I want to elaborate a little on the extraordinary degree to which the Bush administration, allegedly engaged in some sort of cover-up of its misdeeds, actually cooperated with the CIA leak investigation.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 29, 2008
WASHINGTON - The Bush White House, long accused by outside critics of misrepresenting the facts to make the case for the war in Iraq and other matters, has launched a personal counter- attack against harsh accusations of "deception" from a longtime insider who worked closely with the president. White House aides past and present are strongly dismissing the words of Scott McClellan, who served as President Bush's press secretary and has written a book accusing Bush of misleading the public about the war and more.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 16, 2007
There's an old maxim that if Napoleon had been struck by a cannonball on his way to Moscow, he would be remembered as an unrivaled military genius and liberator. But Napoleon overstayed history's welcome and was treated harshly for it, first by the Russians and Mother Nature, then by his own people and, ultimately, by historians. In this and other respects, Karl Rove strikes me as a Napoleonic figure. He won an impressive string of campaigns. He dreamed of erecting a new political order on the ashes of the old. He'd look awfully dashing in one of those bicorn hats.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | April 17, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- The Bush White House seems driven by a secret doctrine that has gotten little public attention: the Doctrine of Two Years Too Late. Over and over, in recent months, the Bush team has adopted policies it rejected two, three or four years ago, when those policies might have made a difference. You might say that two years too late is better than never. But it's tragic to see the administration adopt sensible policies now that might have saved the day in Iraq and elsewhere had they been ushered in earlier.
BUSINESS
By Justin Hyde and Justin Hyde,Detroit Free Press | April 13, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Former Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca tears into the Bush administration and the U.S. auto industry in a new book, saying America's political leaders have failed the nation and urging voters to pick more carefully next year. Iacocca, 82, who was urged to run for president in the 1980s after turning Chrysler around, says he's for higher federal fuel-economy standards, warns that Chrysler could become a "shattered remnant" if sold and offers suggestions for Detroit's automakers to turn their businesses around.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 30, 2007
Former White House chef Walter Scheib has spilled a state secret: The leader of the free world eats organic. Not willingly, mind you. But at first lady Laura Bush's direction, the larder at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. is stocked with the sort of pesticide-free, non-genetically modified fare you'd expect to find in a lefty grocery, not a righty White House. "Mrs. Bush told me early in the first term she was adamant about organics," Scheib, a holdover from the Clinton years who was replaced early in Bush's second term, told a crowd at Goucher College yesterday.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
The following dialogue between Byron York of National Review and Jeff Lomonaco of the University of Minnesota on the fallout from the I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby trial originally appeared on www.latimes.com. Jeff, In the wake of the Libby guilty verdicts, many Democrats are talking about the Bush administration's finally being held accountable for lying the nation into war, and there's also talk of further "accountability" in the form of possible congressional hearings. But I want to elaborate a little on the extraordinary degree to which the Bush administration, allegedly engaged in some sort of cover-up of its misdeeds, actually cooperated with the CIA leak investigation.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 31, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's spin team still calls him "a uniter not a divider." But the description rings hollow after Vermont Sen. James Jeffords' departure from the Republican Party. When it counted, Dubya couldn't even keep his own senators united. Unity is a make-or-break proposition in a 50-50 Senate, where keeping all of your fellow partisans in line is about as easy as juggling 50 balls in the air -- or maybe 50 hand grenades. Drop one and you lose your majority and your ability to set the body's agenda.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | January 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When President Bush lost his re-election bid two months ago, he told his staff to use their last weeks on the government payroll to look for work. Nearly everyone took him up on it, but few with the intensity of speech writer Curt Smith.Mr. Smith inundated prospective employers, including the Baltimore Sun, with a video-taped biography, press release from his publicist and photograph of himself with the president and first lady Barbara Bush at a White House Christmas party.In his eagerness to impress, Mr. Smith sent his job solicitation letters out on White House letterhead stationery, a violation of White House policy he called "inadvertent" and for which he faces no punishment.
FEATURES
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | July 25, 2006
WASHINGTON-- --Back when Tony Snow was free to speak his mind, he lambasted the news media and President Bush with almost gleeful abandon. Journalists were elitists who "tend to look on the American public with finicky disdain," Snow wrote in a 2004 Web column. Network news thrived on "snob appeal." Reporters "almost never admit an error," and their use of unnamed sources was "slimy" - a way to "make sloppy reporting easier to commit and harder to detect," he wrote last year. As for Bush, he was "something of an embarrassment," a leader afflicted by the "wimp factor," wrote the man who would soon become the face of Bush's White House.
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush made two reluctant bows this week to the limits of his wartime powers, the latest examples, analysts said, of his administration's practice of asserting the broadest possible executive authority until forced to reverse course. In a tentative deal with lawmakers announced yesterday, he said he would authorize a secret intelligence court to review the National Security Agency's surveillance program. Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, the Republican Judiciary Committee chairman who drafted NSA legislation with Bush's support, announced the agreement on Capitol Hill, declaring that his bill constituted an acknowledgement "that the president does not have a blank check" even in wartime.
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