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By Jules Witcover | June 30, 2003
WASHINGTON - If Ronald Reagan were following developments in the new era of the Bush Doctrine, he might well be tempted to repeat his memorable line when Jimmy Carter, in their 1980 debate, accused him of being against Medicare: "There you go again." President Bush's comment the other day regarding suspected Iranian proliferation of weapons of mass destruction was full of the same bluster that marked his pre-invasion warnings to Iraq to get rid of its doomsday weapons - whose existence, by the way, still remains a mystery.
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NEWS
February 2, 2012
xxxABC anchorman Charles Gibson came across as a stern, no-nonsense senior professor putting a graduate student through a tough exam in the first part of his interview with Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. It was round one of a three-part interview that will air on the network through tomorrow night, and you had to give it as a split decision to Gibson. But he was far from perfect, and he clearly received a lot of help from the way the interview was edited. The usually genial Gibson was firm and authoritative without being hectoring as he and the Republican vice presidential candidate sat stiffly knees to knees in leather chairs discussing God, national security and the possibility of military action against Russia if it invades Georgia again.
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NEWS
February 2, 2012
xxxABC anchorman Charles Gibson came across as a stern, no-nonsense senior professor putting a graduate student through a tough exam in the first part of his interview with Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. It was round one of a three-part interview that will air on the network through tomorrow night, and you had to give it as a split decision to Gibson. But he was far from perfect, and he clearly received a lot of help from the way the interview was edited. The usually genial Gibson was firm and authoritative without being hectoring as he and the Republican vice presidential candidate sat stiffly knees to knees in leather chairs discussing God, national security and the possibility of military action against Russia if it invades Georgia again.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | December 25, 2009
OK, as virtually every opinion peddler has remarked this week, the "oughts" sucked. For one thing, the decade we're finishing up began and ended with the bursting of unsustainable financial booms. As we headed into the 21st Century, reality asserted itself, as it is wont to do, by shattering the dreams of those who quit their jobs to day trade stocks. It seemed so easy. An ever-rising tech stock boom promised a road to riches untainted by having to answer to a boss, keep regular hours, endure troublesome commutes or adhere to a dress standard.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 15, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The report that Secretary of State Colin L. Powell will step down after President Bush's first term -- dismissed by Mr. Powell as "gossip" -- nevertheless has much logic to it in light of the former general's defensive role in the administration's foreign policy. For all his spoken assurances that he is in lockstep with the president and major administration proponents of the essentially unilateral pre-emptive war against Iraq, Mr. Powell seemingly has been dragged kicking and screaming into the implementation of what is now known as the Bush Doctrine.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - The administration can put whatever spin it chooses on its decision to go back hat-in-hand to the United Nations for help in coping with the catastrophe in Iraq. But it's a clear admission that President Bush committed a colossal blunder in plunging ahead with his invasion without the United Nations in on the takeoff. To borrow a phrase from Cuban Missile Crisis days, it looks as if Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and the president finally went eye-to-eye on what to do about the fiasco, and George W. blinked.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | March 24, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- If you were wondering what the White House has learned from three years of Iraq errors, recent days don't offer much comfort. President Bush has been giving speeches assuring Americans that things are going well, with a few speed bumps. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld says that "the terrorists ... are losing." But the most unsettling event was the unveiling of a new national security strategy that reaffirms the 2002 Bush doctrine of pre-emptive war. Pre-emptive war is the concept that America will attack its enemies - whether state or terrorist group - before they attack us, especially if we think they may use weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - Judging from the much ado about gay marriage, one might conclude that the country has run out of more serious issues to worry about. President Bush, to the delight of his conservative base, is pushing for a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage. The move clearly is part of his administration's effort to focus public attention on the culture war rather than on the shooting war in Iraq that continues to plague him. In making Iraq part of the war on terrorism when it originally wasn't, he relies on his showboat brand of patriotism to counter the Democratic criticism that has been gaining steam throughout the primary election season.
TOPIC
By Trudy Rubin and Trudy Rubin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 10, 2002
REPUBLICANS used to criticize the Clinton team for spouting tough moral rhetoric on foreign policy, then failing to follow through. "Talk big and carry a twig" was the charge leveled against Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright. So how come President Bush has let himself get snarled in a rhetorical trap that makes Albright's polemics look puny? A new Bush doctrine - unveiled in his State of the Union address the week before last - labels Iraq, Iran, and North Korea as an "axis of evil."
NEWS
December 5, 1992
Any pretence that the "humanitarian army" the United State is sending into Somalia will be out of there by Inauguration Day, January 20, can be discarded forthwith. Gen. Colin L. Powell, who will carry on as chairman of the joint chiefs of staff from the Bush to the Clinton administrations, now estimates it could be three months before the security situation will allow American forces to turn over their mission to a United Nations peacekeeping force. His forecast may be optimistic.In any event, it is now clear that Gov. Bill Clinton, as president, will have to decide when and how to terminate an armed intervention that has been ordered by President Bush.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | March 24, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- If you were wondering what the White House has learned from three years of Iraq errors, recent days don't offer much comfort. President Bush has been giving speeches assuring Americans that things are going well, with a few speed bumps. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld says that "the terrorists ... are losing." But the most unsettling event was the unveiling of a new national security strategy that reaffirms the 2002 Bush doctrine of pre-emptive war. Pre-emptive war is the concept that America will attack its enemies - whether state or terrorist group - before they attack us, especially if we think they may use weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 1, 2004
BOSTON - The phrase "pre-Sept. 11 mindset" has become a mantra for the Bush re-election campaign. In every stump speech in every swing state, the president not only accuses John Kerry of being untrustworthy, but of viewing the world with a "pre-Sept. 11 mentality," or a "Sept. 10 mindset." On Sept. 10, 2001, a psychic was the guest on Larry King Live. Hardball ran a segment on hazing by a field hockey team. And Katie Couric opened her show by saying: "With troubling economic news, anemic growth and rising unemployment, all eyes are on Wall Street, today, Monday, Sept.
NEWS
By Robert C. Byrd | August 24, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The Constitution of the United States of America is sheer genius captured on parchment. The delicate balance of authority -- the system of checks and balances and separation of powers -- has served as the foundation for our liberties, providing for the flexibility needed to accommodate two centuries of change and growth while also inspiring people around the world to strive for liberty. The Constitution is designed, as Chief Justice John Marshall observed, "to endure for ages to come."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 5, 2004
WASHINGTON - When George W. Bush began assembling his administration more than three years ago, the first impression was that the new president was simply calling in old warriors from his father's inner circle. After all, the new vice president, Dick Cheney, had been the senior Mr. Bush's secretary of defense. And other featured players in the junior Mr. Bush's new lineup, such as Donald H. Rumsfeld, the new defense secretary, and his deputy, Paul Wolfowitz, had also toiled in high positions under his father.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 17, 2004
WASHINGTON - Did the brutal terrorist bombing in Madrid produce the ouster of one of President Bush's staunchest allies in the war in Iraq? Or was Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar headed for defeat anyway? That is an important open question following Sunday's election replacing Mr. Aznar with Socialist Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, who had pledged if elected to pull Spain's token forces out of Iraq. Pre-election polls indicated that as much as 90 percent of Spaniards surveyed opposed the Iraq invasion and the dispatch there of the 1,300-member Spanish contingent.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - Judging from the much ado about gay marriage, one might conclude that the country has run out of more serious issues to worry about. President Bush, to the delight of his conservative base, is pushing for a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage. The move clearly is part of his administration's effort to focus public attention on the culture war rather than on the shooting war in Iraq that continues to plague him. In making Iraq part of the war on terrorism when it originally wasn't, he relies on his showboat brand of patriotism to counter the Democratic criticism that has been gaining steam throughout the primary election season.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 2, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Now that the inspections of Iraqi facilities in a search for weapons of mass destruction have begun, there seem to be two distinct aspirations among those awaiting reports. Most of the United Nations apparently hope that the inspection teams will find no such weapons or the means to make them, but if they are found, that Saddam Hussein will then admit their existence and agree to their demolition. The Bush administration appears to hope that he will continue to deny their existence even if strong evidence is discovered, thus vindicating the administration's sweeping allegations and providing the green light for American military action, with or without U.N. sanction and assistance.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 1, 2004
BOSTON - The phrase "pre-Sept. 11 mindset" has become a mantra for the Bush re-election campaign. In every stump speech in every swing state, the president not only accuses John Kerry of being untrustworthy, but of viewing the world with a "pre-Sept. 11 mentality," or a "Sept. 10 mindset." On Sept. 10, 2001, a psychic was the guest on Larry King Live. Hardball ran a segment on hazing by a field hockey team. And Katie Couric opened her show by saying: "With troubling economic news, anemic growth and rising unemployment, all eyes are on Wall Street, today, Monday, Sept.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - The administration can put whatever spin it chooses on its decision to go back hat-in-hand to the United Nations for help in coping with the catastrophe in Iraq. But it's a clear admission that President Bush committed a colossal blunder in plunging ahead with his invasion without the United Nations in on the takeoff. To borrow a phrase from Cuban Missile Crisis days, it looks as if Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and the president finally went eye-to-eye on what to do about the fiasco, and George W. blinked.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 15, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The report that Secretary of State Colin L. Powell will step down after President Bush's first term -- dismissed by Mr. Powell as "gossip" -- nevertheless has much logic to it in light of the former general's defensive role in the administration's foreign policy. For all his spoken assurances that he is in lockstep with the president and major administration proponents of the essentially unilateral pre-emptive war against Iraq, Mr. Powell seemingly has been dragged kicking and screaming into the implementation of what is now known as the Bush Doctrine.
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