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Bush And Clinton

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NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | July 29, 1992
GEORGE Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot did not show up at the Mayors' Save Our Cities March on Washington last May 16. (Mr. Clinton did send a message.)All three presidential candidates found that they had commitments elsewhere, although the mayors had announced the date and place of the rally a year earlier.Clearly, all three candidates and their handlers had reached the same conclusion: Their chances of election would be improved by keeping their distance. They preferred rhetoric about the plight of the cities (while media and public attention to the Los Angeles riots had not yet evaporated)
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | November 27, 2007
Mario J. Boiardi, a retired Eastern Shore businessman and son of the Italian-born chef who created the "Chef Boyardee" line of canned foods, died of cancer Saturday at his Queenstown home. He was 81. Mr. Boiardi - whose last name is pronounced "Boyardee" - was born in Cleveland and raised in Milton, Pa. His father, Hector J. Boiardi, an Italian immigrant who had been head chef of the Plaza and Ritz-Carlton hotels in New York City, and his mother, Helen, moved to Cleveland in 1917, where they opened a restaurant.
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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | October 29, 1992
WASHINGTON -- With Ross Perot's support beginning to wane in the wake of his vague charges of Republican dirty tricks, both the Clinton and Bush camps are trying to assess which of them benefits most from the latest twist in this year's political drama.Officials of President Bush's campaign were heartened yesterday by a slight tightening of the race reflected in national polls, with the president's support moving from the low-30s to the mid-30s and the race growing closer in the industrial Midwest.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 4, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush enlisted two former presidents yesterday -- his father and Bill Clinton -- to lead a nationwide fund-raising effort to aid victims of the South Asia tsunamis, including those in Indonesia, the world's largest Muslim nation. But regional specialists said the expanding U.S. relief role might do little to soften the image of America among the world's Muslims. "We're here to ask our fellow citizens to join in a broad humanitarian relief effort," Bush said in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, where he was joined by former Presidents George Bush and Clinton.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 24, 1992
The likely fall campaign between President Bush and Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton will be the first electoral collision between the two generations that have dominated American life for the past 45 years.At age 67, Mr. Bush is, in all probability, the last who will be drawn from the "GI generation," presidents who fought as young men in World War II, manned the barricades of the Cold War and who have held the Oval Office without interruption since former President Kennedy captured the presidency more than 31 years ago.If Mr. Clinton, 45, holds on to win the Democratic race, he would become the first presidential nominee from the baby boom -- the 76-million-member generation that has revolutionized America's social mores, but not yet exerted the political influence many of its members have considered their birthright since the turbulent 1960s.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 25, 1992
Hurricane Andrew is the doing of (A) the Bush administration; (B) the Democratic Congress; or (C) God. If you marked C, your candidate dropped out of the race.Bush and Clinton are preparing a Category 5 campaign with sustained winds above 155 miles an hour.In attacking Hillary Clinton's legal pushiness and causes, leading Republicans have managed to come out in favor of child abuse as a family value.Cal Jr. for President! Ron Shapiro for trade negotiator.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | October 6, 1992
Washington.--That imperious ''welfare'' billionaire Ross Perot got his presidential nomination from the ''volunteers'' that he mostly bought and paid for.There was a time when this would have frightened me, because this arrogant little man who got rich at the federal trough is not God's greatest gift to democracy. He is a thin-skinned tyrant who is given to hiring spies to probe into the lives of his associates, his opponents and even his children. The free press is something he tolerates only when it can be manipulated to his ends.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | June 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In the latest sign of the public's hunger for a political outsider in the White House, a new national survey has found that a complete non-candidate, retired Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, commands nearly as much voter power as presidential contender Ross Perot.The poll by the Times Mirror Center for the People and the Press similarly shows that Americans are so fed up with traditional politicians and the institutions of Washington that they are willing to take a giant risk in this election year -- to sacrifice experience and ignore constitutional safeguards if it means strong leadership and change.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- What's been said about the weather -- that everybody talks about it but nobody does anything about it -- could be said right now about the Ross Perot phenomenon and the reaction of the George Bush and Bill Clinton campaigns.For weeks now, Perot has energetically blotted out the sun of publicity for the presumptive Republican and Democratic presidential candidates by popping up on television with more frequency than Jay Leno, and by continuing to give newspaper interviews while contending he is busy doing his homework.
NEWS
October 2, 1992
So H. Ross Perot is belatedly a candidate for president with only a month and a day until voters go to the polls. Barring the greatest turnaround in public sentiment in all the annals of politics, he stands no chance to win. At mid-year, the Texas billionaire was a real contender, often edging the two major-party candidates in three-way opinion heats. Now, according to the latest samplings, he is down to single digits, a hero mainly to volunteers who put him on the ballot in all 50 states despite their disappointment over his July withdrawal.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 5, 2000
GLENSIDE, Pa. - Making his final pre-election stops in the much-contested states of Michigan and Pennsylvania, Texas Gov. George W. Bush offered some of his strongest language yet to argue that he is the presidential candidate who will restore integrity and personal responsibility to the White House. Bush's message was intended to remind voters of President Clinton's scandalous affair with a White House intern, which led to his impeachment. But it also came two days after reports of the Republican nominee's arrest in 1976 for driving under the influence of alcohol that created a distraction his campaign hopes it has put behind him. "Those in public life should stand side by side with parents in promoting values for how we live our lives," Bush said at an early-morning rally of several thousand supporters in Dearborn, Mich.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Glass | June 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Rodham said today, "I shall go to Kosovo" in a bid to extract U.S. forces from the Balkan quagmire. Ms. Rodham's pledge to visit the shaky cease-fire lines as her first presidential act was promptly assailed as "an empty gesture" by Vice President Elizabeth Dole, the Republican choice to succeed President George W. Bush in 2009. Broadcasting from her Internet site, people-first.com, Ms. Rodham cited what she termed "the long litany of Bush blunders that have compelled our brave women and men to forgo their role as peacekeepers to fight a ground war against the Eastern Orthodox Axis on behalf of the Islamic Brotherhood."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 16, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Call it "Postergate," a scandal full of illegalit and denials that reaches from Los Angeles City Hall to the White House.Some of the best-known politicos in the land have been implicated -- Bill Clinton and George Bush and the Los Angeles mayoral candidates, Michael Woo and Richard Riordan.All of them -- and dozens more -- have been billed by Los Angeles for flouting Section 28.04 of the Los Angeles Municipal Code. That means that they or their agents illegally posted campaign signs on public property -- telephone poles, light fixtures and even palm trees.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | October 31, 1992
It's no surprise that Chesapeake Bay didn't figure in the presidential debates. But the election will make a difference.Here are Bush and Clinton probabilities, with impacts of some close congressional races thrown in for good measure.The core funding for the bay restoration effort has fared well under President Bush. Since 1983, annual federal spending has been $15 million to $20 million.Mr. Bush's most recent budgetkicked in $40 million to improve Baltimore's Back River sewage plant, second biggest on the bay.As for Environmental Protection Agency, the lead federal agency in Chesapeake restoration, the caliber of appointees to key jobs isgenerally considered excellent.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | October 30, 1992
Political satire, from the cartoons of T. J. Nast and Herblock to the sophisticated ditties of Mark Russell, has helped America stomach many a grim election year. And, thanks to the Annapolis Theater Project, 1992 is no exception.Conceived by Tom Magette and Morey Norkin, "Undecided" is a snappy review of songs and sketches that takes no political prisoners. George, Bill, Ross, "Bar," Hillary, Dan, Al, Tipper, Marilyn and our august Congress are poked, prodded, panned and pickled by a very funny succession of political parodies that use music from such sources as "Oklahoma," "Guys and Dolls," "Mame," "Evita," "Annie Get Your Gun" and "Pippin."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | October 29, 1992
WASHINGTON -- With Ross Perot's support beginning to wane in the wake of his vague charges of Republican dirty tricks, both the Clinton and Bush camps are trying to assess which of them benefits most from the latest twist in this year's political drama.Officials of President Bush's campaign were heartened yesterday by a slight tightening of the race reflected in national polls, with the president's support moving from the low-30s to the mid-30s and the race growing closer in the industrial Midwest.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 1, 1992
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Not all of Dee Zuber's fellow Perot supporters had cable television, so she invited them over the other night to eat fried chicken and watch their favorite non-politician on the "Larry King Live" show. Ross Perot did not yet, as speculated, announce that he was back in the presidential race, but she and the others weren't disappointed. They figured it was only a matter of time.After the show, in which Perot said once again that it was up to "the volunteers" in his United We Stand America movement he has bankrolled to make the decision on running, it was unanimous.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | August 18, 1992
If you are going to be an informed voter in November, you mustknow the things the letters of the alphabet stand for, and make your choice as to which really concern you.A is for abortion and adultery; but also for awareness of the economic miseries and fears of the American people.B is for bimbos and Bosnians, one group surely deserving more attention than the other.C is for cronyism, corruption and children, one out of four now living in poverty in America.D is for deficit, and dirt, and direction, one of which the country truly needs.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 27, 1992
NEW ORLEANS -- President Bush flew into Cajun Country over the weekend to dispense a little more federal largesse, in this case by signing a federal energy bill that encourages offshore drilling that, by Bush's reckoning, would create 45,000 new jobs in the Oil Patch.The most obvious lesson in the president's appearance here -- and one quickly scheduled by Democratic nominee Bill Clinton -- is that the contest for Louisiana's nine electoral votes is far from over. And that, in turn, suggests troubles for Bush, who won the state with more than 54 percent of the vote four years ago.The national polls may show the race drawing somewhat closer in terms of the popular vote, but the president is still groping for a combination of states that could produce the 270 electoral votes needed to win. By this stage of the campaign, Bush should be spending his entire time in states like New Jersey, Michigan and Ohio that he must have.
NEWS
October 23, 1992
Compromises are the cause of U.S. woes=Writing as a Republican activist, I have been disappointed by President Bush's handling of domestic affairs.Inheriting the office from one of our most successful presidents, Mr. Bush proceeded to do the political equivalent of throwing away four aces. Mr. Bush's failures, however, have not altered my decision to vote for him for the following reason.Many observers have called the past 12 years the "Reagan-Bush" era. By doing so, they have tried to link Mr. Bush's problems to the Reagan administration.
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