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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
The Maryland Transportation Authority reported at 9:07 a.m. on Wednesday that a blocked right lane on Interstate 95 North in Baltimore has been reopened with the clearing of an accident past the Baltimore Washington Parkway exit. The Maryland Transit Administration reported at 9:12 a.m. that buses and trains were running on schedule.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
The Maryland Transportation Authority reported at 9:07 a.m. on Wednesday that a blocked right lane on Interstate 95 North in Baltimore has been reopened with the clearing of an accident past the Baltimore Washington Parkway exit. The Maryland Transit Administration reported at 9:12 a.m. that buses and trains were running on schedule.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
With two incidents in Anne Arundel County cleared, local traffic moved without unscheduled road closures at 9:05 a.m. on Thursday, according to the state Department of Transportation. The Maryland Transit Administration reported at 9:05 a.m. that buses and trains are running on schedule.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
A single-vehicle crash in Baltimore City on Interstate 95 South past the Key Highway exit has closed the right southbound shoulder at 7:43 a.m. on Friday, according to the state Department of Transportation. DOT also reported that police activity in Baltimore City on Interstate 95 North at the Keith Avenue exit has closed the right lane at 7:41 a.m. The Maryland Transit Administration reported at 8 a.m. that buses and trains are running on schedule.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
A single-vehicle crash in Baltimore City on Interstate 95 South past the Key Highway exit has closed the right southbound shoulder at 7:43 a.m. on Friday, according to the state Department of Transportation. DOT also reported that police activity in Baltimore City on Interstate 95 North at the Keith Avenue exit has closed the right lane at 7:41 a.m. The Maryland Transit Administration reported at 8 a.m. that buses and trains are running on schedule.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
As major arteries in Baltimore and across the state were scraped down to the blacktop yesterday, buses and trains began limited service by midafternoon. But officials warned that the region's transportation networks will take days to fully recover. The Maryland Transit Administration resumed service on parts of nine bus lines and a northern stretch of the light rail line yesterday. Officials expect more bus lines to be in service today on main roads and snow emergency routes. Maryland Rail Commuter trains are to begin running today after being shut down for two days.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Laura Barnhardt and Stephen Kiehl and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2003
The state's transportation network - all but shut down for the past two days - is expected to hobble back toward normal today, as officials plan on resuming flights at area airports and returning buses and trains to limited service. After canceling about 700 flights yesterday, officials at Baltimore-Washington International Airport plan to put some planes in the air today. Buses and light rail could be back in service by the afternoon, but the subway will not run at all, officials said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | February 1, 2010
For months, the Washington Metro system, once one of the most admired transit systems in the country, has seemed to be at the lowest point in its history - forced to make painful budget choices, facing a hole in top management and struggling to recover from a series of fatal accidents that called its safety into question. The deaths of two track maintenance employees last week has only made matters worse, prompting the National Transportation Safety Board, a frequent critic of Metro's safety performance in the past, to launch yet another investigation of the troubled transit agency.
NEWS
By David Gardiner | August 24, 2009
Baltimore commuters have a big stake in the fate of the American Clean Energy Security Act, also known as the Waxman-Markey bill, which passed the U.S. House in June and heads to the Senate this fall. This landmark legislation is the first attempt of the federal government to drive the United States to a clean-energy economy with lower greenhouse gas emissions, more jobs in new clean energy industries and less dependence on uncertain oil supplies. It will lead to important new investments in energy efficiency to save consumers money, and new forms of generating clean electricity, such as solar and wind.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
With earlier incidents in Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties cleared, local traffic moved without unscheduled road closures at 9 a.m. on Thursday, according to the state Department of Transportation. The Maryland Transit Administration reported at 9 a.m. that buses and trains were running on schedule.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | February 1, 2010
For months, the Washington Metro system, once one of the most admired transit systems in the country, has seemed to be at the lowest point in its history - forced to make painful budget choices, facing a hole in top management and struggling to recover from a series of fatal accidents that called its safety into question. The deaths of two track maintenance employees last week has only made matters worse, prompting the National Transportation Safety Board, a frequent critic of Metro's safety performance in the past, to launch yet another investigation of the troubled transit agency.
NEWS
By David Gardiner | August 24, 2009
Baltimore commuters have a big stake in the fate of the American Clean Energy Security Act, also known as the Waxman-Markey bill, which passed the U.S. House in June and heads to the Senate this fall. This landmark legislation is the first attempt of the federal government to drive the United States to a clean-energy economy with lower greenhouse gas emissions, more jobs in new clean energy industries and less dependence on uncertain oil supplies. It will lead to important new investments in energy efficiency to save consumers money, and new forms of generating clean electricity, such as solar and wind.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
As major arteries in Baltimore and across the state were scraped down to the blacktop yesterday, buses and trains began limited service by midafternoon. But officials warned that the region's transportation networks will take days to fully recover. The Maryland Transit Administration resumed service on parts of nine bus lines and a northern stretch of the light rail line yesterday. Officials expect more bus lines to be in service today on main roads and snow emergency routes. Maryland Rail Commuter trains are to begin running today after being shut down for two days.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Laura Barnhardt and Stephen Kiehl and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2003
The state's transportation network - all but shut down for the past two days - is expected to hobble back toward normal today, as officials plan on resuming flights at area airports and returning buses and trains to limited service. After canceling about 700 flights yesterday, officials at Baltimore-Washington International Airport plan to put some planes in the air today. Buses and light rail could be back in service by the afternoon, but the subway will not run at all, officials said.
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