Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBus Station
IN THE NEWS

Bus Station

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2001
Never in Charles L. Smith's 14 years on St. Paul Street has the area around Penn Station seemed so alive. A few Washington commuters are looking to buy rowhomes. A tapas bar has opened next to the revamped Charles Theatre, and the Everyman Theatre playhouse is thriving. The last thing the borderline neighborhood needs, Smith says, is for a Greyhound bus station to rise on a parking lot north of the train station. Lodging what amounts to an 11th-hour objection, he and some powerful allies are raising concerns ranging from added diesel exhaust to the prospect of loitering.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 14, 2012
Most Marylanders who oppose the Dream Act, which grants undocumented immigrants the resident tuition discount on a state college education, probably never met the likes of Onan Marroquin. If they did, they might have a change of heart and mind about the Dream Act. They might come to see it as the fair and smart way for the state to support the bright and highly motivated young people who come through our schools and who, with more education, might join the ranks of the state's innovative and future-thinking professional class.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2001
Never in Charles L. Smith's 14 years on St. Paul Street has the area around Penn Station seemed so alive. The last thing the neighborhood needs, he asserts, is for a Greyhound bus station to rise north of the train station. Lodging what amounts to an 11th-hour objection, he and allies are raising concerns ranging from added diesel exhaust to the prospect of loitering. "What I think they're doing is driving another nail in the coffin, pure and simple," says Smith, vice president of the Charles North Community Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | November 7, 2011
Remember last week when the teams carried their beds into a remote Malawi village? They then slept in private huts. Enjoy this moment from Ernie: "Home sweet home. Got my mosquito netting, just like at home. Got my straw roof, just like at home. " Ernie has been my secret tv boyfriend for a few weeks, but now I'm going public with it because he makes me laugh. After their cozy night in the village, all the teams end up on the same crowded bus to Salima. Amani and Marcus were an hour and a half behind, but they squeeze onto the bus just before it leaves, telling the driver that their friends are on board.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | December 7, 1999
After more than two years of negotiations, the Maryland Historical Society is poised to acquire the former Greyhound bus terminal at Howard and Centre streets. The local landmark figures prominently in the society's $28 million expansion and renovation plan for its Mount Vernon history campus.Directors say they expect the society to take title later this month to the Art Moderne bus station, which dates from the early 1940s and was transformed to offices after the Greyhound Corp. moved to a different location in 1982.
NEWS
November 23, 2001
CHARLES STREET boosters' objections to a new bus terminal come far too late. Greyhound has already won crucial approvals for its $15 million depot and garage near Amtrak's Penn Station. The project also has Mayor Martin O'Malley's unflagging support. Despite its seeming inevitability, though, it's not too late to make sure that the bus terminal is done right. Greyhound Lines Inc. must guarantee it will operate a station that will not become a magnet for vagrants and panhandlers. Mayor O'Malley must pledge to improve the area around Penn Station.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 16, 2004
MOBILE, Ala. - There won't be any witnesses here. No memories of the howling winds or bending trees, no visions of the flooding, the destruction, the deaths or whatever else they imagine. Hurricane Ivan arrived in southern Alabama last night. That was clear from the television reports, and from the invisible beasts that rattled the metal doors. But the people who most respected Ivan's power - those who followed officials' advice and fled to the concrete-walled safety of the city's high schools and hospitals - will remember only the communal sounds and smells of shelter life, and always the cold, hard floor.
NEWS
June 3, 2002
BALTIMORE NEEDS a convenient, centrally located Greyhound bus station. This much should be self-evident. The distant and difficult-to-find Travel Plaza in East Baltimore is no good as a permanent replacement when the Fayette Street terminal's lease expires at the end of the year. It makes no sense for travelers from Washington, New York, Philadelphia and elsewhere to end up stranded miles from downtown. Until five months ago, Greyhound was all set to build a new terminal next to Amtrak's Penn Station.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
State and city officials welcomed a new left-turn signal on Russell Street yesterday as they sought to bury the hatchet on their nearly yearlong battle over linking public transit to Baltimore's new Greyhound bus station. From the moment the station opened at 2110 Haines St. in June, public transit riders have been forced to walk there from a bus stop two blocks away, crossing six lanes of heavy traffic. The problem: State-run public buses did not stop at the station, and a median prevented southbound vehicles from making a left turn onto the street leading to the station.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 18, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A coordinated trio of morning rush hour bombs at a bus station and a hospital killed 43 people Wednesday, breaking the lull that had descended on Baghdad in recent weeks and reminding the capital that the insurgency is still in business. The bombs exploded within minutes of one another and appeared to be aimed at causing maximum civilian casualties. The attacks coincided with the arrival in Baghdad of the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, Gen. Richard B. Myers, and with the political suspense building around the delayed deadline for Iraqi leaders to complete their new constitution.
NEWS
February 23, 2011
After reading former NAACP chairman Julian Bond's comments on same-sex marriage ("Julian Bond: Md. must end marriage discrimination," Feb. 18), I have come to the conclusion that many of the people whom I once held in high regard have lost their way. If you ask the smallest child about marriage, they will answer marriage is between a man and a woman. All logic not to mention the Bible prove this. The attempt to link same-sex marriage with civil rights is demeaning to the civil rights movement.
NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 29, 2005
JERUSALEM -- A Palestinian suicide bomber blew himself up yesterday near the central bus station in Beersheba in southern Israel, seriously wounding two security guards who tried to stop him. It was the first such attack since Israel began a withdrawal from the Gaza Strip this month. Islamic Jihad claimed responsibility for the bombing. The militant group had vowed revenge after Israeli undercover troops killed five Palestinians, one an Islamic Jihad leader, in the West Bank town of Tulkarem last week.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 18, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A coordinated trio of morning rush hour bombs at a bus station and a hospital killed 43 people Wednesday, breaking the lull that had descended on Baghdad in recent weeks and reminding the capital that the insurgency is still in business. The bombs exploded within minutes of one another and appeared to be aimed at causing maximum civilian casualties. The attacks coincided with the arrival in Baghdad of the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, Gen. Richard B. Myers, and with the political suspense building around the delayed deadline for Iraqi leaders to complete their new constitution.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2005
Three people remained hospitalized in serious condition last night as police continued to investigate yesterday's early morning crash of a Greyhound bus that spun completely around and slid off rain-slicked Interstate 95 in East Baltimore, tipping onto its side. Passengers described a nightmarish scene of toppling into each other in the dark cabin. No one died, but at least 13 ambulances took 33 people and the driver to six area hospitals. Maryland Transportation Authority police, trying to learn the cause of the accident and reconstruct how it occurred, fanned out to the hospitals and to the Greyhound bus station in South Baltimore, where some passengers waited to catch other buses and continue their journey.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
State and city officials welcomed a new left-turn signal on Russell Street yesterday as they sought to bury the hatchet on their nearly yearlong battle over linking public transit to Baltimore's new Greyhound bus station. From the moment the station opened at 2110 Haines St. in June, public transit riders have been forced to walk there from a bus stop two blocks away, crossing six lanes of heavy traffic. The problem: State-run public buses did not stop at the station, and a median prevented southbound vehicles from making a left turn onto the street leading to the station.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
One week after state Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan sharply criticized Baltimore's economic development efforts, he appeared at City Hall to say more money is on the way from Annapolis. This time it was Flanagan who was on the receiving end of complaints. While city officials and residents welcomed the added transportation funding, they raised issues about a light rail station that is only open for events at the Ravens stadium and the lack of public transportation to a temporary Greyhound bus station.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 3, 1991
To make a long story short, I had to go to Allentown, and I couldn't take my car. I had to take the bus.So I call the bus line."What service," I politely ask the telephone receptionist, "do you have between Baltimore, Md., and Allentown, Pa., this Saturday morning?"She tells me there is a bus leaving Baltimore at 7:05, arriving in Allentown at 11:45 a.m."Four hours and 40 minutes to Allentown?""Yes sir."Well, what can you do? I'm the dope who wants to go to Allentown. And I'm the one who has decided to take the bus. I'm the one asking for trouble.
NEWS
February 23, 2011
After reading former NAACP chairman Julian Bond's comments on same-sex marriage ("Julian Bond: Md. must end marriage discrimination," Feb. 18), I have come to the conclusion that many of the people whom I once held in high regard have lost their way. If you ask the smallest child about marriage, they will answer marriage is between a man and a woman. All logic not to mention the Bible prove this. The attempt to link same-sex marriage with civil rights is demeaning to the civil rights movement.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 16, 2004
MOBILE, Ala. - There won't be any witnesses here. No memories of the howling winds or bending trees, no visions of the flooding, the destruction, the deaths or whatever else they imagine. Hurricane Ivan arrived in southern Alabama last night. That was clear from the television reports, and from the invisible beasts that rattled the metal doors. But the people who most respected Ivan's power - those who followed officials' advice and fled to the concrete-walled safety of the city's high schools and hospitals - will remember only the communal sounds and smells of shelter life, and always the cold, hard floor.
NEWS
By Matt Whittaker and Matt Whittaker,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2004
While unveiling plans to connect public transportation to Baltimore's new Greyhound bus station, state Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan accused the city yesterday of ignoring pedestrian safety in the area near the terminal, just southwest of M&T Bank Stadium. The location, at 2110 Haines St., poses "serious concern about access to the new Greyhound terminal as well as serious safety issues we believe Baltimore City has overlooked," Flanagan said. The comments came more than a week after Flanagan bristled at requests by Mayor Martin O'Malley and U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings for a Maryland Transportation Administration bus route to the temporary station on Haines Street.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.