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NEWS
June 22, 2011
In recent weeks, federal authorities have shut down four motor coach operators for presenting an "imminent danger" to the public. Unqualified bus drivers, poorly kept records, and even instances of allowing passengers to ride in bus luggage compartments were among the myriad safety violations that caused the offending companies to be shut down. Whether the actions will actually keep the companies out of business is another question. Such charter operators have a penchant for resurfacing under a new name — but with the same dangerous ways of doing business.
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NEWS
August 25, 2014
This week, youngsters across Maryland will board the "big yellow cheese wagon," as it's sometimes called, and head back to school. And chances are high (aside perhaps from those teary-eyed moms and dads waving good-bye to their kindergartners for the first time), the school bus commute from home to classroom will take place without incident. But the latest survey conducted by the Maryland State Department of Education shows that the students' fate is being tempted on a regular basis by drivers who seem either unaware of the law or unwilling to follow it. Drivers are forbidden to pass a bus in either direction when its stop arm swings out and its lights are flashing, yet that happens all the time.
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NEWS
Erica L. Green | September 5, 2012
The Maryland State Department of Education released Wednesday the results of a state-wide survey of  showing that motorists continue to bypass stop arms on school buses--the signs that swing out and flash when a bus stops to board students--at a "frightening rate. " A survey of roughly 63 percent of Maryland bus drivers noted 4,657 violations in April, according to a release from the department, which sponsored the survey at the recommendation of several members of the Maryland General Assembly.  In 2011, the number of violations reported was 7,000, recorded by about 65 percent of the state's bus drivers.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | September 5, 2012
The Maryland State Department of Education released Wednesday the results of a state-wide survey of  showing that motorists continue to bypass stop arms on school buses--the signs that swing out and flash when a bus stops to board students--at a "frightening rate. " A survey of roughly 63 percent of Maryland bus drivers noted 4,657 violations in April, according to a release from the department, which sponsored the survey at the recommendation of several members of the Maryland General Assembly.  In 2011, the number of violations reported was 7,000, recorded by about 65 percent of the state's bus drivers.
NEWS
July 2, 2003
Carroll County law enforcement agencies will get $29,000 in state grants to improve the safety of children riding on school buses through the county's towns and unincorporated areas. State Police Superintendent Col. Edward T. Norris announced the allocations yesterday in handing out $550,000 from the school bus safety enforcement fund, which is used by state and local police departments to enforce Maryland traffic laws related to school bus safety. Most police agencies use the money to cover overtime pay for officers assigned to school bus patrols.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | September 28, 1994
Since Stella Fanzone saw a neighborhood child struck and killed by a driver who didn't stop for the flashing lights of a school bus, she's been working to make sure a similar accident never happens again.The Clary's Forest resident runs CROSS -- Citizens Reach Out for Student Safety -- a 2-year-old organization devoted to raising awareness of school bus safety."To me, one child's death is too much," Mrs. Fanzone, a former Howard County public school teacher, said. "It really bothered me that something happened.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1996
BUS SAFETY IS something everyone should be aware of. Students at Carrolltowne Elementary School will acknowledge National School Bus Safety Week with several programs designed to heighten their awareness of safety.Dedicated members of Carrolltowne's Health, Safety and Special Needs Committee of the PTA spent Friday afternoon transforming the school's lobby into a big yellow school bus. Committee Chairwoman Beth Harkins hopes this will help the children become more aware of safety concerns.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | September 28, 1994
Since Stella Fanzone saw a neighborhood child struck and killed by a driver who didn't stop for the flashing lights of a school bus, she's been working to make sure a similar accident never happens again.The Clary's Forest resident runs CROSS -- Citizens Reach Out for Student Safety -- a 2-year-old organization devoted to raising awareness of school bus safety."To me, one child's death is too much," Mrs. Fanzone, a former county public school teacher, said. "It really bothered me that something happened.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
Debbie Saffer, a 19-year veteran school bus driver, sports a thick gold chain and school bus charm, proof of her professional pride.Saffer spent three hours under a hot sun yesterday instructing 45 Baltimore County school bus drivers and attendants during the county's first hands-on summer review course -- complete with obstacle course, emergency evacuation exercises and mechanical checks."
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun Reporter | October 22, 2006
The next time you're in a hurry and think you can get by a school bus making its umpteenth stop, think about this: The fine for passing a stopped school bus with its red lights flashing is $570 and three points on your driving record. And you will most likely be cited because school bus drivers note license plate numbers, car descriptions, time, date and location of violations, and report them to the police and to the Carroll County Public Schools' Transportation Department. "I have up to a year to issue a violation," said Sheriff's Deputy 1st Class Conrad Dill, who has already issued 50 citations this school year on almost daily bus patrols.
NEWS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
More than a half million dollars has been committed to law enforcement agencies across the state to improve school bus safety, the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention announced Monday. Though the commitment comes months after a one-day study the State Department of Education discovered more than 7,000 violations by drivers regarding school bus safety, the two are not related, a state spokesman said. "There's no direct cause and effect," said Bill Toohey, a spokesman for the Office of Crime Control and Prevention.
NEWS
June 22, 2011
In recent weeks, federal authorities have shut down four motor coach operators for presenting an "imminent danger" to the public. Unqualified bus drivers, poorly kept records, and even instances of allowing passengers to ride in bus luggage compartments were among the myriad safety violations that caused the offending companies to be shut down. Whether the actions will actually keep the companies out of business is another question. Such charter operators have a penchant for resurfacing under a new name — but with the same dangerous ways of doing business.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | January 12, 2008
School, transit and police officials told city lawmakers yesterday that they have taken steps to improve student safety on city buses in the wake of a recent spate of violence. Baltimore police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III told the city delegation that as a result of the incidents, he has ordered the creation of "buffer zones" around 18 city schools, most of them middle schools, with a dedicated officer assigned to staff them in the mornings and afternoons. "The only reason they can leave that post is for a life-threatening emergency call," Bealefeld said.
NEWS
November 22, 2006
The deaths of four teen-agers in Monday's horrifying Alabama school bus crash is likely to renew the debate over whether school buses should be equipped with safety belts. A recent study found that school bus-related accidents injure 17,000 U.S. children each year. That's double previous estimates that were based solely on crash data. Most of the injuries are not life threatening, but require trips to emergency rooms. Safety advocates suspect many of these injuries might be prevented if buses were required to have 3-point shoulder and belt restraints.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun Reporter | October 22, 2006
The next time you're in a hurry and think you can get by a school bus making its umpteenth stop, think about this: The fine for passing a stopped school bus with its red lights flashing is $570 and three points on your driving record. And you will most likely be cited because school bus drivers note license plate numbers, car descriptions, time, date and location of violations, and report them to the police and to the Carroll County Public Schools' Transportation Department. "I have up to a year to issue a violation," said Sheriff's Deputy 1st Class Conrad Dill, who has already issued 50 citations this school year on almost daily bus patrols.
NEWS
October 15, 2006
School bus safety is focus this week School Bus Safety Week will be observed today through Saturday by the Carroll County Safe Kids Coalition, CRASH Coalition, Maryland State Police, Sheriff's Office and the town police departments. Police will enforce school bus safety strongly throughout the county all week. School bus safety presentations will be given at Linton Springs and Westminster Elementary schools with "Otto the Auto," an animated teaching car from the AAA Foundation. Information: 410-876-4448.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | January 14, 1993
The Glenwood Middle School PTSA will hold its general meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the school gym.Bus contractor Dale Ashwell will speak on bus safety. Gymnastics students from Glenwood will perform, under the direction of social studies teacher Tom Thrasher and science teacher Bonnie Palmer.The children do a wonderful job in their after-school gymnastics classes. Glenwood students and their parents are welcome to attend free.Information: 313-5520.*Imagine free ice cream. Does the thought make you hungry?
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2004
The pupils were out of control. They threw balled-up paper, pushed and shoved each other and were rowdy. Except this time, the scene wasn't real life but a skit acted out on stage yesterday at Baltimore's Thurgood Marshall Middle School in front of an audience all too familiar with the storyline. They all have been on that bus. The Maryland Transit Administration has gone on the road to city middle schools this year to educate pupils and parents about the dangers of horsing around on buses.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2004
The pupils were out of control. They threw balled-up paper, pushed and shoved each other and were rowdy. Except this time, the scene wasn't real life but a skit acted out on stage yesterday at Baltimore's Thurgood Marshall Middle School in front of an audience all too familiar with the storyline. They all have been on that bus. The Maryland Transit Administration has gone on the road to city middle schools this year to educate pupils and parents about the dangers of horsing around on buses.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
Saying that children are endangered every time a driver fails to stop for a school bus flashing its red lights, Carroll County school officials highlighted yesterday a partnership with local police departments to target law-breaking motorists. As the first day of school started, school officials emphasized at a news conference yesterday that police on the streets are looking for drivers who don't stop for buses that are picking up or dropping off children. "Police presence was everywhere" throughout the county yesterday, said Jim Doolan, the school system's transportation director.
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