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NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1997
The Mass Transit Administration will field comments and concerns this week from riders protesting the state agency's decision to discontinue midday, late-night and Saturday bus service between Columbia and Silver Spring as of June 1.The public meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday at The Other Barn in the Oakland Mills Village Center, Columbia.Six of the 26 round-trip runs between Columbia and Silver Spring each week are being cut.Officials of the MTA -- which oversees the service provided under a contract with Eyre Bus Service Inc. -- will be on hand to discuss alternatives for riders who will be affected by the cuts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
A 68-year-old man died Tuesday morning after a struggle with Maryland Transit Administration police investigating a report of an attack on a bus driver in West Baltimore, authorities confirmed. MTA officers were called to the 1100 block of Cloverdale Road about 5:45 a.m. for a report that a "man with a cane" was assaulting the bus driver and another rider, according to Paulette Austrich, an MTA spokeswoman. Austrich said the man was being combative and went into cardiac arrest when four officers attempted to restrain him. She said he was revived through CPR and taken to Maryland General Hospital.
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
Has Baltimore's 7-month-old Central Light Rail Line put the squeeze on the city's more popular subway and bus systems?Mass Transit Administration officials say that's not so, but many regular bus and Metro riders think otherwise. Some of them used that contention to lambaste MTA officials yesterday for the agency's plan to cut back on transit service and raise fares."When you spent so much money on light rail, you laid an egg," Ralph Sanders, a city resident, told representatives of the MTA yesterday.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | January 25, 2013
Editor: The main objective covered in this letter is makinga case for why transportation for the disabled should be more accessible. People with disabilities try to keep their dignity by doing things for themselves. For it shows natural independence as opposed to having a person care for them hence assisted living. It is very difficult for the disabled people to get around Harford County. For example, people who want to see a special event in another part of the county or in another county, must arrange rides to the event.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | March 20, 2008
Some bus riders in Baltimore brace themselves before stepping aboard. They say they never know what might happen. Even after transit and city officials vowed to make public transportation safer after a brawl in December that left a 26-year-old woman with broken facial bones, the experience of riding buses is far from serene, some regulars said yesterday. "Sometimes kids get on the bus and your heart is pounding," said a nursing assistant who, fearing for her safety, gave only her Nigerian first name, Ebun, as she waited for the No. 27 bus in Hampden -- the same route on which the Dec. 4 assaults occurred.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | December 18, 2006
HAGERSTOWN -- Jocelyn Grindle was hauling a heavy blue cooler full of Joe Corbi pizzas to deliver to her co-workers, but the extra burden wasn't enough to push her into a car for the grueling commute to downtown Washington. Instead, she kept her standing date with Maryland's longest commuter bus line -- an 80-minute ride on Route 991 from Hagerstown to the Shady Grove Metro stop in Montgomery County. "I said, `No, I'm going to carry this bag,'" said Grindle, who is in her 30s and works as an accountant for a Washington nonprofit organization.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | July 15, 1993
The Mass Transit Administration has backed off its plans to eliminate trips on the No. 210 bus from Anne Arundel County to Baltimore, and the agency even plans to reinstate an evening trip that had been cut, thrilling bus riders in Severna Park."
NEWS
February 10, 1993
Severna Park bus riders give MTA an earfulSeverna Park bus riders complained to state Mass Transit Administration (MTA) representatives last night about wet seats, windows that won't close and late buses.The MTA officials attended the monthly meeting of the Greater Severna Park Council where commuters discussed cuts in the No. 210 service from Severna Park to Baltimore."The windows won't stay closed. I carry two rubber bands to hold them," said Reg Quilter, a bus rider for 15 years. "I even know which windows not to sit by," he said.
NEWS
September 23, 1990
On the theory that you can still get there from here -- but just barely -- we'd like to hear from Baltimore-area commuters who have suffered and triumphed during their daily odyssey to the factory or office.The Sun is taking a look at the worst of the region's commuting problems and plans to recount some of the misadventures of motorists and Metro, train and bus riders who race to work by the dawn's early light.To tell your tale, park yourself at a Touch-tone phone and dial Sundial any time today or tomorrow.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
A bus caravan on its way to Washington to lobby for universal health coverage stopped in Baltimore yesterday, drawing about 80 protesters and supporters to the University of Maryland School of Medicine.Five "Health Security Express" buses carrying about 160 people arrived at Davidge Hall shortly after 5 p.m. The caravan started out from Boston on Sunday and is due in Washington today, where it will join caravans from Portland, Ore., Dallas, New Orleans and Independence, Mo. First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton will meet with the bus riders at the White House today.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2011
A nine-month survey of Maryland Transit Administration bus and rail riders has found that the No. 1 gripe of the agency's customers — by an overwhelming margin — is that their ride doesn't show up on time. In a final report on its "Rate Your Ride" survey of about 6,700 MTA riders, the Central Maryland Transportation Alliance found that riders complained more about lateness than about rude drivers, skipped stops, dirty vehicles and all other concerns. "There's no other issue that comes close to getting where they want to go on time," said Michele Whelley, president of the nonprofit alliance that conducted the survey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
Aboard the North Avenue bus — The woman in the khaki cutoffs with the close-cropped hair might not have expected her "American Idol" moment to occur while she was riding the Number 13 bus. But if that was the venue chosen by Providence, she was determined not to miss her chance. "You should put me in your play," she told the pair of twenty-somethings seated across from her as they bent over a laptop, conferring seriously. She'd never met Ira Gamerman and Jayme Kilburn before they happened to share the same ride.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | March 20, 2008
Some bus riders in Baltimore brace themselves before stepping aboard. They say they never know what might happen. Even after transit and city officials vowed to make public transportation safer after a brawl in December that left a 26-year-old woman with broken facial bones, the experience of riding buses is far from serene, some regulars said yesterday. "Sometimes kids get on the bus and your heart is pounding," said a nursing assistant who, fearing for her safety, gave only her Nigerian first name, Ebun, as she waited for the No. 27 bus in Hampden -- the same route on which the Dec. 4 assaults occurred.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | December 30, 2007
No matter what his four daughters say, 77-year-old Edward Garbus remains a loyal customer of the Maryland Transit Administration. His daughters plead with him and offer him rides to wherever he needs to go - especially after four violent incidents in the past month on MTA buses. Garbus turns them down. "My daughters have fancy-schmancy cars, and they say, `Don't ride the bus,'" said the Mount Vernon resident. A mischievous smile formed on his face. "But I ride it every day." Many MTA bus riders, like Garbus, are aware of the recent spate of violence on city buses.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | August 16, 2007
Several disabled adults and a driver were injured about 4 p.m. yesterday when a Carroll Area Transit System bus in which they were riding collided with another vehicle on Route 27 near Taylorsville, state police in Westminster said. The small bus, run by the nonprofit group and carrying eight passengers, was southbound on Route 27 when it was struck by a pickup pulling out of Marston Road, Trooper Daxton Bury said.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,special to the sun | January 17, 2007
Maroulla Plangetis marked the Rev. Martin Luther King's birthday on an Annapolis Transit bus. Over a four-hour period Monday, the Annapolis High School senior and more than a dozen other volunteers rode in circles around the city, handing other passengers brochures with tips on how to solve problems peacefully. Recalling King's support of Freedom Rides in the 1960s to protest segregated seating on public buses, Plangetis looked at the white, black and Hispanic riders sitting together and mused that the civil rights leader would be proud to see what the movement has accomplished.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | September 5, 1993
The Art Shaw school of thought is based on busesWhen a Labor Day virus attacked a number of school bus drivers last year, Art Shaw, owner of Shaw Bus Service, drove a school bus route in Baltimore County for several months."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2011
A nine-month survey of Maryland Transit Administration bus and rail riders has found that the No. 1 gripe of the agency's customers — by an overwhelming margin — is that their ride doesn't show up on time. In a final report on its "Rate Your Ride" survey of about 6,700 MTA riders, the Central Maryland Transportation Alliance found that riders complained more about lateness than about rude drivers, skipped stops, dirty vehicles and all other concerns. "There's no other issue that comes close to getting where they want to go on time," said Michele Whelley, president of the nonprofit alliance that conducted the survey.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | December 18, 2006
HAGERSTOWN -- Jocelyn Grindle was hauling a heavy blue cooler full of Joe Corbi pizzas to deliver to her co-workers, but the extra burden wasn't enough to push her into a car for the grueling commute to downtown Washington. Instead, she kept her standing date with Maryland's longest commuter bus line -- an 80-minute ride on Route 991 from Hagerstown to the Shady Grove Metro stop in Montgomery County. "I said, `No, I'm going to carry this bag,'" said Grindle, who is in her 30s and works as an accountant for a Washington nonprofit organization.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Photo by Colby Ware [Special to the Sun] | October 1, 2006
Keeping pace with top riders Mary Jane Hai, 75, a widow for 18 years, never bothered to get her driver's license. Georgiana Ansart, 84, didn't want the stress of getting lost when she moved from Florida to Westminster four months ago. And Donald Staub, 84, likes to have his breakfast at Wal-Mart everyday and then spend each afternoon lunching and dozing in the food court of the TownMall of Westminster. All three are regular riders on the Carroll Area Transit System buses and vans. Seniors depend on the transit system to get around, as the county's elderly population grows.
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