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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1995
For nearly half a century, the vacant Greyhound Corp. bus garage at Park Avenue and Centre Street in Baltimore served Marylanders traveling from coast to coast.Soon it will foster travels of a different sort -- journeys over time rather than terrain.In October, the Maryland Historical Society will begin converting the Art Moderne building to a museum annex showcasing "300 Years of Maryland History." The conversion will be the first phase of a $10 million to $20 million effort by society directors to broaden the offerings of the 151-year-old institution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Of course, The Star-Spangled Banner is still there - the original manuscript of the little poem written in 1814 by Francis Scott Key that would become his country's National Anthem. But visitors to the Maryland Historical Society, which opens today after being closed for five months, will see far more than one famous document - even if it remains the collection's centerpiece, preserved under glass and on view for only 10 minutes each hour. (During the other 50 minutes, a facsimile will be on display)
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1995
The Maryland Historical Society launched its $20 million expansion yesterday with a "garage door opening" ceremony signaling the start of the conversion of the former Greyhound bus garage in Baltimore into a showcase for 350 years of state history.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke hailed the project as a key component of the "Avenue of the Arts" his administration is working to create along the Howard Street corridor."The fact that you've decided to remain in the city and invest in the city is significant for Baltimore and will resonate throughout the city," the mayor told society members and administrators gathered inside the garage.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1997
Francis "Dick" Lambert was "The Eggman," the MTA driver who often brought passengers a carton of eggs or fruit. Everyone knew Dick Lambert -- other drivers, passengers, police officers -- and his easy manner made everyone like him.Mr. Lambert, 58, a resident of Finksburg in Carroll County who drove a bus for the Mass Transit Administration for 34 years, died Tuesday of cancer at the Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown."Every time I saw him, there was a hug and a kiss involved," said Stephanie Travis, assistant superintendent at the MTA's Bush Division on Monroe Street and Mr. Lambert's supervisor.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
GIVEN ALL the building demolition in Baltimore these days, it's something of a miracle that the former Greyhound bus garage survived the wrecking ball. But survive it did, and yesterday it opened as the setting for the Maryland Historical Society's Heritage Gallery, home of the bicentennial exhibit "Baltimore Inc."The 6,000-square-foot gallery is the first phase of a renovation of the 1941 bus garage at Park Avenue and Centre Street, a companion to the former Greyhound bus station at Howard and Centre streets.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1997
WHEN A HEAVY snowstorm caused the roof of the old Greyhound bus garage in Mount Vernon to collapse four years ago this week, redevelopment officials in Baltimore might have made a case for knocking down the rest of the building andturning the property into a parking lot.Instead, they committed funds to stabilize the bulging north wall and reconstruct the vaulted timber roof so the empty garage could be put to a new use.As a result of their decision to...
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1995
In an effort to showcase 300 years of state history, the Maryland Historical Society wants to tear down two buildings that are part of Baltimore's Mount Vernon Historic District.The historical society also is preparing to turn its back on Howard Street by placing its main entrance on Park Avenue, even though the Schmoke administration has been encouraging cultural organizations to help transform the corridor to an "Avenue of the Arts."Preliminary plans for a $10 million expansion of the society's complex at 201 W. Monument St. have drawn rebukes from preservationists and architects concerned about the fate of Howard Street.
NEWS
August 3, 1995
A couple of years ago, when the Maryland Historical Society opened an unusual show called "Mining the Museum," curated by New York artist Fred Wilson, the normally staid institution dedicated to preserving the state's historical legacy suddenly found itself with one the hottest exhibition venues in the country. The show helped attract a record 53,759 visitors during its 11-month run and set another record for the number of people who took group tours of the exhibit.It also put the historical society on the map among curators as a forward-looking institution willing to go beyond the traditional concerns of regional museums to bring its message to a broader audience.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | June 9, 1991
It started as the most improbable of ideas:To think someone could take the grimy old Greyhound service terminal at Park Avenue and Centre Street -- not the bus station itself but the garage next door, vacant since 1976 -- and transform it for even a short time into a Museum for Contemporary Arts was clearly carrying the idea of adaptive reuse further than it has been carried before, even in Baltimore.Yes, thousands flocked to see the meticulous conversion of the Thomas-Jencks-Gladding mansion on Mount Vernon Place to an Asian Arts museum for the Walters Arts Gallery.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1997
Francis "Dick" Lambert was "The Eggman," the MTA driver who often brought passengers a carton of eggs or fruit. Everyone knew Dick Lambert -- other drivers, passengers, police officers -- and his easy manner made everyone like him.Mr. Lambert, 58, a resident of Finksburg in Carroll County who drove a bus for the Mass Transit Administration for 34 years, died Tuesday of cancer at the Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown."Every time I saw him, there was a hug and a kiss involved," said Stephanie Travis, assistant superintendent at the MTA's Bush Division on Monroe Street and Mr. Lambert's supervisor.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
GIVEN ALL the building demolition in Baltimore these days, it's something of a miracle that the former Greyhound bus garage survived the wrecking ball. But survive it did, and yesterday it opened as the setting for the Maryland Historical Society's Heritage Gallery, home of the bicentennial exhibit "Baltimore Inc."The 6,000-square-foot gallery is the first phase of a renovation of the 1941 bus garage at Park Avenue and Centre Street, a companion to the former Greyhound bus station at Howard and Centre streets.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1997
WHEN A HEAVY snowstorm caused the roof of the old Greyhound bus garage in Mount Vernon to collapse four years ago this week, redevelopment officials in Baltimore might have made a case for knocking down the rest of the building andturning the property into a parking lot.Instead, they committed funds to stabilize the bulging north wall and reconstruct the vaulted timber roof so the empty garage could be put to a new use.As a result of their decision to...
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1995
The Maryland Historical Society launched its $20 million expansion yesterday with a "garage door opening" ceremony signaling the start of the conversion of the former Greyhound bus garage in Baltimore into a showcase for 350 years of state history.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke hailed the project as a key component of the "Avenue of the Arts" his administration is working to create along the Howard Street corridor."The fact that you've decided to remain in the city and invest in the city is significant for Baltimore and will resonate throughout the city," the mayor told society members and administrators gathered inside the garage.
NEWS
August 3, 1995
A couple of years ago, when the Maryland Historical Society opened an unusual show called "Mining the Museum," curated by New York artist Fred Wilson, the normally staid institution dedicated to preserving the state's historical legacy suddenly found itself with one the hottest exhibition venues in the country. The show helped attract a record 53,759 visitors during its 11-month run and set another record for the number of people who took group tours of the exhibit.It also put the historical society on the map among curators as a forward-looking institution willing to go beyond the traditional concerns of regional museums to bring its message to a broader audience.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1995
For nearly half a century, the vacant Greyhound Corp. bus garage at Park Avenue and Centre Street in Baltimore served Marylanders traveling from coast to coast.Soon it will foster travels of a different sort -- journeys over time rather than terrain.In October, the Maryland Historical Society will begin converting the Art Moderne building to a museum annex showcasing "300 Years of Maryland History." The conversion will be the first phase of a $10 million to $20 million effort by society directors to broaden the offerings of the 151-year-old institution.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1995
In an effort to showcase 300 years of state history, the Maryland Historical Society wants to tear down two buildings that are part of Baltimore's Mount Vernon Historic District.The historical society also is preparing to turn its back on Howard Street by placing its main entrance on Park Avenue, even though the Schmoke administration has been encouraging cultural organizations to help transform the corridor to an "Avenue of the Arts."Preliminary plans for a $10 million expansion of the society's complex at 201 W. Monument St. have drawn rebukes from preservationists and architects concerned about the fate of Howard Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Of course, The Star-Spangled Banner is still there - the original manuscript of the little poem written in 1814 by Francis Scott Key that would become his country's National Anthem. But visitors to the Maryland Historical Society, which opens today after being closed for five months, will see far more than one famous document - even if it remains the collection's centerpiece, preserved under glass and on view for only 10 minutes each hour. (During the other 50 minutes, a facsimile will be on display)
NEWS
By Staff Report | October 24, 1993
A duckpin bowling alley in Glen Burnie near Crain Highway and Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard that was destroyed in a five-alarm fire Friday afternoon was torn down yesterday. Fire officials estimated damage at $3.5 million.Battalion Chief Gary Sheckells, a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Fire Department, said that the cause of the blaze at the Greenway Bowling Center was still not known.He said the fire began in a concealed open space behind the mechanical pin-setters on the second floor.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | June 9, 1991
It started as the most improbable of ideas:To think someone could take the grimy old Greyhound service terminal at Park Avenue and Centre Street -- not the bus station itself but the garage next door, vacant since 1976 -- and transform it for even a short time into a Museum for Contemporary Arts was clearly carrying the idea of adaptive reuse further than it has been carried before, even in Baltimore.Yes, thousands flocked to see the meticulous conversion of the Thomas-Jencks-Gladding mansion on Mount Vernon Place to an Asian Arts museum for the Walters Arts Gallery.
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