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By Steve McKerrow | April 24, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Does it ever seem like almost everyone on television has had a shot at being host of a talk show? Chevy Chase is the latest, now preparing a show for the Fox network. But here's a vote for Burt Reynolds getting one.The star of CBS' "Evening Shade" has another good outing as an occasional chatmeister tonight, on "Burt Reynolds' Conversations With . . . The Ladies of Country Music" (at 10 o'clock, Channel 11).Viewers who saw Reynolds' first "Conversations With . . . " special last fall, with Hollywood legends June Alyson, Jane Powell, Ginger Rogers and Esther Williams, might agree the star has a surprisingly easy-going style that elicits something rare on talk TV: genuine conversation, as opposed to plugs, bits of comedy acts and other obviously prepared material.
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By PETER SCHMUCK | March 9, 2007
The Orioles play at Roger Dean Stadium in Jupiter a total of six times this spring, which should provide ample opportunity for me to sneak away and visit the Burt Reynolds & Friends Museum. The museum, which is located on U.S. 1 in Jupiter, is a shrine to the television and movie star who had such terrific range that he dated Oscar winner Sally Field and was married to comedienne Judy Carne and television actress Loni Anderson. Burt's a pretty good actor, too, with well-regarded roles in Deliverance and Boogie Nights as well as the lovable rogue he played in several Smokey and the Bandit movies.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 9, 2007
The Orioles play at Roger Dean Stadium in Jupiter a total of six times this spring, which should provide ample opportunity for me to sneak away and visit the Burt Reynolds & Friends Museum. The museum, which is located on U.S. 1 in Jupiter, is a shrine to the television and movie star who had such terrific range that he dated Oscar winner Sally Field and was married to comedienne Judy Carne and television actress Loni Anderson. Burt's a pretty good actor, too, with well-regarded roles in Deliverance and Boogie Nights as well as the lovable rogue he played in several Smokey and the Bandit movies.
NEWS
By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 11, 2005
Brad and Angelina don't enthrall you? Jennifer and Vince haven't earned your friendship with their teasing? Tom and Katie didn't have you at hello? Anyone weary of star preening - and the media's slavish attention to it - will find delirious relief in Celebrity Autobiography: In Their Own Words. This adult special, premiering at 10 p.m. Thursday on Bravo, punctures performers' pomposity with stinging success. Celebrity Autobiography started seven years ago when Los Angeles comedians transformed vapid memoirs into zany theater.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 5, 2005
Chris Rock, Adam Sandler and Burt Reynolds took part in a media conference yesterday to promote the remake of The Longest Yard, the 1974 film that is considered one of the best sports movies. Reynolds starred in the original, about a football game between inmates and guards at a Southern prison. Personally, I'm waiting for Smokey and the Bandit: The Twilight Years. Commissioner Paul Tagliabue opened his State of the NFL address yesterday with the rhetorical question, "Why are we in Jacksonville?
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
Think of "Rocky" on ice skates.That's what you get with "Mystery, Alaska," one of those hard-to-resist little guys-vs.-the world sports tales in which success isn't nearly as important as survival. Here, it's a ragtag bunch of Alaskan hockey players going up against the NHL's mighty New York Rangers.Created by prolific TV producer-director David E. Kelley ("Ally McBeal," "The Practice," "Chicago Hope," etc.), it's filled with his trademark touches: near-absurd situations, characters jumping from one inner crisis to the next, and a sometimes uneasy mix of humor and pathos.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
Ah, just what we need for a relaxing weekend evening: contentious political debates! The lineup offers a couple of prime examples, both local and national. But movies and a Burt Reynolds guest spot may provide relief.* "Square Off" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Although re-scheduled to air only four times a year, the venerable argument show now offers a whole hour of conflict, with host Richard Sher moderating veteran panelists, including: Elane Stein, Tom Marr, Carl Snowden, Boyse Mosley, Arnold Weiner, St. George Crosse, Toni Keane, Ava Lias-Booker, Carter Clews and Bob Scherr.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 25, 2000
"Grumpy Old Goodfellas" it ain't. And that's despite the best efforts of "The Crew" to exploit prostate jokes and bleak mob humor for laughs. Richard Dreyfuss plays the leader of an aging mob crew who, with their best whacks behind them, have retired to Miami to watch thong-clad beauties and rail against the young, tan wannabes who are driving up prices in their apartment building. Once young, handsome and dangerous, the crew is now reduced to living like the schmoes they used to disparage: Bobby Bartellemeo (Dreyfuss)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 10, 1991
Television is changing our notion of entertainment in strange ways.A few weeks ago, Michael Landon went on the "Tonight" show to talk about his impending death. (He died of cancer July 1). And his performance was -- literally -- reviewed in some publications.Tonight at 8 on the The Nashville Network (TNN), Burt Reynolds and Dinah Shore, former lovers, sit down in front of the cameras for 90 minutes during which they mainly discuss their famous love affair of yesterday.A terminal illness and a love affair are pretty private stuff.
FEATURES
By Bob Hiaasen and Bob Hiaasen,Staff Writer | December 16, 1993
If we had to do the holiday shopping for some of TV's most popular characters, what would we get?* Detective Andy Sipowicz of "NYPD Blue": Long-sleeved, pinpoint Oxford dress shirts from Lands End.* Detective John Kelly, "NYPD Blue": Boxer shorts -- because we're tired of seeing your backside. Well, some of us are tired of it.* Maggie O'Connell, "Northern Exposure": Although she never would admit it, Maggie would go goo-goo over Robert James Waller's "Slow Waltz in Cedar Bend."* Dr. Joel Fleischman, "Northern Exposure": Maggie, while high on Waller.
FEATURES
By William Weir and William Weir,HARTFORD COURANT | July 7, 2005
If you felt secure in your belief that you had seen the last of Burt Reynolds, you are not a student of history. In his three-decades-plus career, Reynolds has worked in two modes: everywhere and nowhere. Well, we are now in the Ubiquitous Burt half of the cycle. Indeed, Reynolds has made a career of comebacks. A star on the Florida State University football team, he was drafted by the Baltimore Colts. Before he joined the team, though, an injury ended his sports career. Comeback No. 1: He moves to New York to launch an acting career, which leads to TV gigs and his breakout role in the 1972 movie Deliverance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 29, 2005
ST. LOUIS - This city got a small but real taste of Hollywood in 2000 when one of its favorite sons, rapper Nelly, snagged a key role in the little indie flick Snipes. At the St. Louis premiere, Nelly rolled up in a blue Bentley and strolled down the red carpet escorting his mother, Rhonda Mack. Other red carpet arrivals included several St. Louis Rams, including Marshall Faulk, and the Snipes cast and crew. Turns out, you ain't seen nothing yet. Last week, the red carpet was rolled out again for the local premiere of The Longest Yard.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 5, 2005
Chris Rock, Adam Sandler and Burt Reynolds took part in a media conference yesterday to promote the remake of The Longest Yard, the 1974 film that is considered one of the best sports movies. Reynolds starred in the original, about a football game between inmates and guards at a Southern prison. Personally, I'm waiting for Smokey and the Bandit: The Twilight Years. Commissioner Paul Tagliabue opened his State of the NFL address yesterday with the rhetorical question, "Why are we in Jacksonville?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 20, 2004
Without a Paddle is pretty much without appeal. It's a comedy about three buds who decide to do one last really stupid thing before surrendering to adulthood. They head out on a long camping trip in rough backwoods country, then spend the rest of the film getting each other out of the really fine mess they find themselves in. The premise is not without possibilities - think Laurel and Hardy starring in Deliverance for an idea of what the filmmakers were going for - but it's executed with little imagination and even less wit. Brought together by the death of their mutual friend Billy, longtime pals Jerry (Matthew Lillard)
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 4, 2003
I AM NOT making this up. Hooters, the restaurant chain with the waitresses with the little tank tops and the little short shorts - in Baltimore, I think two-thirds of them are named "Dawn" - is now an airline. When I first heard this, I thought it was a joke. Hooters is famous for wings on a plate, not on a pilot's lapel. (Actually, Hooter's is famous for something else, and I'm not talking about the motion-activated faucets in the bathrooms.) But, it's no joke. You could look it up: Hooters restaurant founder Bob Brooks bought Pace Airlines, a small charter carrier in Winston-Salem, N.C., in December as the foundation for a larger airline.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 25, 2000
"Grumpy Old Goodfellas" it ain't. And that's despite the best efforts of "The Crew" to exploit prostate jokes and bleak mob humor for laughs. Richard Dreyfuss plays the leader of an aging mob crew who, with their best whacks behind them, have retired to Miami to watch thong-clad beauties and rail against the young, tan wannabes who are driving up prices in their apartment building. Once young, handsome and dangerous, the crew is now reduced to living like the schmoes they used to disparage: Bobby Bartellemeo (Dreyfuss)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 2, 1993
"Cop and a Half" ought to be called "The Cutie and the Beast."More a concept than an actual story, it features a gruff and sweaty Burt Reynolds as a blowhard macho police detective ordered to fill in as dad to an ultra-adorable 8-year-old who's witnessed a crime. The youth, played by Norman Golden II, has all the good lines; Reynolds merely snorts and growls at the edge of the frame, models his toupee, and eventually is called upon to melt a little.Young Golden is a find. One of those kids seemingly unaffected by the presence of film cameras, screaming assistant directors, a worried producer and the Fonz himself (Henry Winkler, the director)
FEATURES
By Tim Grobaty and Tim Grobaty,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 11, 1992
Today's lesson is on the Class Clown, so no screwing around. Just pay attention or we'll paddle your bee-hind from here to the vice principal's office, pally.There are -- write this down -- two kinds of class clowns. The most common is the blabbermouth buffoon, who only bags the "clown" title by virtue of disrupting everything. Rarer is the genuinely funny class clown, the one who picks his spots and depends on timing to get his humor across.Both kinds are featured in tonight's sweeps-month special "Class Clowns," at 10 on ABC (Channel 13 in Baltimore)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
Think of "Rocky" on ice skates.That's what you get with "Mystery, Alaska," one of those hard-to-resist little guys-vs.-the world sports tales in which success isn't nearly as important as survival. Here, it's a ragtag bunch of Alaskan hockey players going up against the NHL's mighty New York Rangers.Created by prolific TV producer-director David E. Kelley ("Ally McBeal," "The Practice," "Chicago Hope," etc.), it's filled with his trademark touches: near-absurd situations, characters jumping from one inner crisis to the next, and a sometimes uneasy mix of humor and pathos.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
The naked ladies are the least interesting part of "Striptease," based on the Carl Hiaasen novel. Although the movie is a bit too long, oddball humor and a likable cast keep it entertaining.Demi Moore stars as Erin Grant, who takes a job stripping at the Eager Beaver in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., so she can earn enough money to win a child custody case against her loser ex-husband, Darrell (Robert Patrick, probably best known as the mighty morphin' Terminator in "Terminator 2"). His criminal record got her fired from her job as a secretary with the FBI, and now he's using their daughter (Rumer Willis, Moore's real daughter)
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