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NEWS
By Susan Canfora | May 19, 1991
Singer La Toya Jackson, Michael Jackson's sister and a member of the popular Jackson family, will be at Tiffany's Niteclub, 24th Street and Philadelphia Ave., Friday, May 31. The show will start about 10:30 p.m. For ticket information, call 289-3324.Since she posed for Playboy magazine, Ms. Jackson has been called the family rebel. She recently released her first album in more than four years, titled "La Toya."Plans are under way to bring more big name entertainers to Tiffany's, but there haven't been any formal announcements yet.See the stars at the beach this summer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 3, 2007
The weightlessness and all-encompassing feel of the new music makes the band's name more significant. Air, the electronica French duo of Jean-Benoit Dunckel and Nicolas Godin, achieves a nice balance of accessibility and ethereal inventiveness on its latest album, Pocket Symphony. "In Chinese culture, `air' means the energy of the body," says Dunckel, the available half of Air, which plays Washington's 9:30 Club on Wednesday. "Our music is closer to that. It's more relaxing." But the album is far from somnolent.
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NEWS
By Susan Canfora | May 12, 1991
The stars are coming out in Ocean City this summer. Big name entertainers Ray Charles, Dionne Warwick, Burt Bacharach, Jay Leno, Garth Brooks and Kenny Rogers will be at the Convention Center in July and August.Singer Ray Charles, who is seen advertising Diet Pepsi on television commercials these days, will be there at 8 p.m. July 3. Tickets are $17.50.Dionne Warwick and Burt Bacharach are scheduled for 8 p.m. July 17. Tickets are $25. Comedian Jay Leno, who often sits in for Johnny Carson on the "Tonight Show," will take the stage at 8 p.m. July 31. Tickets are $17.50.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,McClatchy-Tribune | October 26, 2006
John Legend is betting his career on the public's escalating disgust. "Millions of people hate what's on the radio right now," he says. "I also hate what's on the radio right now. So I've put my bet on being different." His new single couldn't be more so. "Save Room" oozes with vintage lounge soulfulness, suggesting something sung by Tom Jones in 1968. In fact, Legend swiped the song's surging organ hook from "Stormy," a hit by the Classics IV that dates back to the Nixon administration.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 2002
The Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre folks can hardly miss with their August show selection based on the Billy Wilder-directed 1960 Oscar-winning film The Apartment, which became a 1968 musical, Promises, Promises. The musical was crafted by one of America's favorite and most prolific playwrights, Neil Simon and boasted a musical score by Burt Bacharach, the songwriter whose music all but identifies the 1960s. Like the film, Promises, Promises traces the rise of mild-mannered young accountant C. C. "Chuck" Baxter, who moves up the corporate ladder by lending his well-located midtown Manhattan apartment to middle-aged executives for round-the-clock trysts with young office assistants.
FEATURES
By The Editors | September 13, 1998
We interrupt your normal Arts & Society section this Sunday to bring you our seasonal guide to the arts.Don't be alarmed, don't try to adjust your subscription - we'll return next week with our usual mix of trend stories, commentary, profiles and social insight. Meanwhile, we offer this comprehensive arts and entertainment calendar of fall and winter events in Baltimore. (We have also included highlights from Washington, and occasionally looked ahead to next spring).The fall promises to be an exciting time in the arts:* On Oct. 11, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will re-create the famous 1808 concert where Beethoven introduced his Fifth and Sixth symphonies and Fourth Piano Concerto.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Kirk and Jim Kirk,Special to the Sun | September 9, 2001
Morris the Cat -- one of America's enduring advertising icons -- apparently does have nine lives. Absent from the small screen for at least six years, the finicky feline, who made his major TV debut in 1969 in ads by Leo Burnett Co., is coming back to network TV. And unlike past comebacks, this time the spokescat will be on the prowl for a good long while, executives at Pittsburgh-based Heinz Pet Products say. A new 30-second campaign featuring Morris...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 3, 2007
The weightlessness and all-encompassing feel of the new music makes the band's name more significant. Air, the electronica French duo of Jean-Benoit Dunckel and Nicolas Godin, achieves a nice balance of accessibility and ethereal inventiveness on its latest album, Pocket Symphony. "In Chinese culture, `air' means the energy of the body," says Dunckel, the available half of Air, which plays Washington's 9:30 Club on Wednesday. "Our music is closer to that. It's more relaxing." But the album is far from somnolent.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 30, 1998
It wasn't the best of times, it wasn't the worst of times.No, 1998 was the blandest of times, a year of teen idols, rap moguls, alt-rock lite and endless replays of "My Heart Will Go On."Not every album released over the last 12 months was boring and predictable -- far from it. But sifting through thousands of new titles to find those few nuggets is practically a full-time job.Fortunately, that's what they pay me for. So here are my picks for the best of 1998, along with the top albums by genres.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 3, 1998
At Christmas, everybody likes getting something special in a fancy box. It might be an expensive Swiss watch; maybe an exquisite piece of jewelry; perhaps an extravagant silk necktie or scarf.Or it could be a bunch of CDs.For their part, the record companies are hoping that this season's gift-buyers will bypass Rolex and Hermes and opt for that fourth choice. To that end, this year's boxed-set offerings have put a premium on packaging, appealing as much to the eye -- and to the collector's instinct -- as to the ear.It hardly matters what's in the box. Whether you go for sounds as safely mainstream as Queen's pomp rock, or as adventurously avant-garde as John Coltrane's jazz, there's a gorgeous boxed set waiting for you.But before you buy, maybe you ought to consider whether the music inside is as dazzling as the artwork outside.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 2002
The Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre folks can hardly miss with their August show selection based on the Billy Wilder-directed 1960 Oscar-winning film The Apartment, which became a 1968 musical, Promises, Promises. The musical was crafted by one of America's favorite and most prolific playwrights, Neil Simon and boasted a musical score by Burt Bacharach, the songwriter whose music all but identifies the 1960s. Like the film, Promises, Promises traces the rise of mild-mannered young accountant C. C. "Chuck" Baxter, who moves up the corporate ladder by lending his well-located midtown Manhattan apartment to middle-aged executives for round-the-clock trysts with young office assistants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Kirk and Jim Kirk,Special to the Sun | September 9, 2001
Morris the Cat -- one of America's enduring advertising icons -- apparently does have nine lives. Absent from the small screen for at least six years, the finicky feline, who made his major TV debut in 1969 in ads by Leo Burnett Co., is coming back to network TV. And unlike past comebacks, this time the spokescat will be on the prowl for a good long while, executives at Pittsburgh-based Heinz Pet Products say. A new 30-second campaign featuring Morris...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 20, 1999
Elvis Costello has had a number of minor movie roles recently, landing cameos in everything from "200 Cigarettes" to "Spice World."But he's never been so cast against type as he is in the Julia Roberts-Hugh Grant romantic comedy, "Notting Hill." And the funny thing is, he isn't even onscreen when it happens.Costello, in fact, is only on the soundtrack, singing the Charles Aznavour ballad "She" as Grant adoringly contemplates Roberts. "It's just a straight-out, adoring love song that's supposed to represent this guy's idealization of this Hollywood goddess," Costello explains, over the phone from London.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 30, 1998
It wasn't the best of times, it wasn't the worst of times.No, 1998 was the blandest of times, a year of teen idols, rap moguls, alt-rock lite and endless replays of "My Heart Will Go On."Not every album released over the last 12 months was boring and predictable -- far from it. But sifting through thousands of new titles to find those few nuggets is practically a full-time job.Fortunately, that's what they pay me for. So here are my picks for the best of 1998, along with the top albums by genres.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 3, 1998
At Christmas, everybody likes getting something special in a fancy box. It might be an expensive Swiss watch; maybe an exquisite piece of jewelry; perhaps an extravagant silk necktie or scarf.Or it could be a bunch of CDs.For their part, the record companies are hoping that this season's gift-buyers will bypass Rolex and Hermes and opt for that fourth choice. To that end, this year's boxed-set offerings have put a premium on packaging, appealing as much to the eye -- and to the collector's instinct -- as to the ear.It hardly matters what's in the box. Whether you go for sounds as safely mainstream as Queen's pomp rock, or as adventurously avant-garde as John Coltrane's jazz, there's a gorgeous boxed set waiting for you.But before you buy, maybe you ought to consider whether the music inside is as dazzling as the artwork outside.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 11, 1998
Elvis Costello wants you to listen carefully to the beginning of his new album, a collaboration with songwriter Burt Bacharach called "Painted From Memory."It starts with a song called "In the Darkest Place," a song about the despair that can wash over a man abandoned and denied by his lover. But it isn't the melody or lyric Costello wants us to hear - at least, not just yet.Where he wants our focus is on the introduction. "Listen to how appealing, how intriguing the opening notes of the record are," he says.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 5, 1995
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Shortly after dawn yesterday at Churchill Downs, an exercise rider boarded Afternoon Deelites and headed toward the track for a workout. The barns were bubbling with reporters and fans, but Afternoon Deelites turned nary a head as he worked out.Only a couple of reporters followed the horse back to barn 41 and asked trainer Richard Mandella to assess the workout. ("Super. He barely touched the ground.") It was quiet enough to hear the horse taking sharp breaths as he cooled out inside the barn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,McClatchy-Tribune | October 26, 2006
John Legend is betting his career on the public's escalating disgust. "Millions of people hate what's on the radio right now," he says. "I also hate what's on the radio right now. So I've put my bet on being different." His new single couldn't be more so. "Save Room" oozes with vintage lounge soulfulness, suggesting something sung by Tom Jones in 1968. In fact, Legend swiped the song's surging organ hook from "Stormy," a hit by the Classics IV that dates back to the Nixon administration.
FEATURES
By The Editors | September 13, 1998
We interrupt your normal Arts & Society section this Sunday to bring you our seasonal guide to the arts.Don't be alarmed, don't try to adjust your subscription - we'll return next week with our usual mix of trend stories, commentary, profiles and social insight. Meanwhile, we offer this comprehensive arts and entertainment calendar of fall and winter events in Baltimore. (We have also included highlights from Washington, and occasionally looked ahead to next spring).The fall promises to be an exciting time in the arts:* On Oct. 11, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will re-create the famous 1808 concert where Beethoven introduced his Fifth and Sixth symphonies and Fourth Piano Concerto.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 5, 1995
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Shortly after dawn yesterday at Churchill Downs, an exercise rider boarded Afternoon Deelites and headed toward the track for a workout. The barns were bubbling with reporters and fans, but Afternoon Deelites turned nary a head as he worked out.Only a couple of reporters followed the horse back to barn 41 and asked trainer Richard Mandella to assess the workout. ("Super. He barely touched the ground.") It was quiet enough to hear the horse taking sharp breaths as he cooled out inside the barn.
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