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BUSINESS
By Andrea Knox and Andrea Knox,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 6, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Penny Reuss remembers vividly the weekend corporate America finally pushed her too far.She worked in her office at Unisys Corp. until 9 p.m. Friday, went home and grabbed supper, worked through the night, slept from 5 a.m. to 8 a.m., worked all day Saturday, worked all day Sunday.Monday morning she handed in three projects.Wednesday morning she handed in her resignation."There was so much pressure and so many projects," says Ms. Reuss, who until a year ago was director of product management for Unisys' U.S. Information Systems group.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
As principal of a small Southeast Baltimore school, Anthony Ruby has guided an array of first-year teachers, from the stars who seem to have an innate sense of how to handle a class to those who were so ineffective he declined to renew their contracts. When teachers aren't effective, he said, "it is not fair to our kids," many of whom are low-income and immigrant. Hundreds of teachers are hired each year to fill vacancies in Baltimore, and the majority will be newcomers to the profession.
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NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1994
Robert J. Wicks is a professor and the director of program development in the world's only doctoral program in pastoral counseling -- at the Columbia campus of Loyola College.Because his specialties are "integration of psychology and spirituality" and the secondary stress disorders usually called burnout, he said, his patients are likely to be helpers in need of help: emotionally exhausted physicians, nurses, psychotherapists, teachers, police officers, firefighters, ministers, rabbis, priests, religious sisters.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
The recruiting of underclassmen has been a hot topic in lacrosse the past few years as more and more rising sophomores have made oral commitments to colleges. On Thursday, US Lacrosse, the sport's national governing body, stoked the debate by putting out a statement essentially condemning the process and calling for reform, including an age limit for recruits. Here's the statement:   The US Lacrosse Board of Directors today approved the following statement on the complex nature of the collegiate recruiting process for high school student-athletes.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | December 8, 1991
Remember the coaching burnout theory?Dick Vermeil, who walked away from the Philadelphia Eagles coaching job after the 1982 season, virtually invented the syndrome, and Al Davis, the Los Angeles Raiders czar, was quick to jump on the bandwagon.Davis likes to say that it's difficult for a coach to last longer than a decade these days in the pressure-cooker job.Maybe it's time for Davis to take a long look at Joe Gibbs.The coach of the Washington Redskins shows no signs of burnout. Eleven years into the job at age 51, his competitive fires burn as brightly as ever.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1990
THE TERRIBLE toos afflict children of all ages.Too many expectations.Too many media images of perfection.Too many fears.Too much guilt brought on by too many "shoulds."These "toos" douse the energy and enthusiasm of too many fired-up kids.And they ignite another terrible too -- too much burnout, a malady that has affected parents for some time and has now spread to their children, some as young as 7 or 8."Twenty to 30 percent of kids experience some kind of burnout," says Joseph Procaccini, associate professor of education at Loyola College and the author of two parenting books.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 3, 2006
What happens when a tragic burnout meets a determined optimist? Well, we all know the answer to that, right? The optimist wins, the burnout is revived and all is well once again with the world. That's a pretty standard Hollywood formula, which makes 16 Blocks a pretty standard Hollywood picture. But in the capable hands of director Richard Donner (Die Hard) and screenwriter Richard Wenk, that's a very good thing - especially when the resulting movie marks an intriguing new chapter in an established actor's career and an exciting milestone in that of a relative newcomer.
SPORTS
By Sam Goldaper and Sam Goldaper,New York Times News Service | November 7, 1990
NEW YORK -- Looking for coaching security? Not in the National Basketball Association. Lose and you are out. Stay on the job long enough and there is burnout.The dismissal of Doug Moe by the Denver Nuggets after 10 seasons, Pat Riley's leaving the Los Angeles Lakers after nine seasons and Mike Fratello's calling it quits with the Atlanta Hawks after seven, has left this season's 27 survivors with an average of less than two years as head coaches with their present teams.Chuck Daly of the Detroit Pistons, in his ninth season, and Lenny Wilkens, starting his fifth with the Cleveland Cavaliers, are now the elder statesmen.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1991
Vacations necessaryWorkers who feel guilty about taking vacations shouldn't. In fact, most bosses believe their workers are more productive if they take time off from the day-in, day-out grind, according to a new survey.Indeed, top executives feel they, too, need vacations for the same reasons their employees do: to prevent burnout, increase productivity on the job and improve personal relationships.Out of 500 executives across the United States surveyed by Chicago-based Hyatt Hotels Corp.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | September 29, 1991
n the '80s, we traded soggy Chinese carryout and greasy barbecued ribs for take-home roasted leg of lamb encrusted with pesto and pasta salad with sun-dried tomatoes and artichoke hearts.Now, in the '90s, gourmet takeout can be almost anything we want it it be -- from top-quality versions of simple fare like meatloaf and bread pudding to low-fat, low-calorie meals prepared with diet as well as taste in mind.These days it's easier than ever before to get the same quality prepared foods at home that we have learned to expect from our restaurant mania of the past decade.
SPORTS
By Dr. Richard Hinton, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Over the past 50 years, we have gone from major league athletes with offseason jobs to young athletes with, often, no offseason at all, from parents sticking their heads out the back door to call their children home from play to parents rushing out the door for the next officially sanctioned event. Historically, children have played sports for fun, with the wonderful byproduct of learning life's lessons. Today, achievement in a single sport seems to be the increasing focus. Some parents are choosing year-round lacrosse-only participation for their children long before they have experienced a wide range of other activities.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | September 15, 2009
Orioles right-hander David Hernandez said he isn't tired and doesn't believe he has hit the proverbial rookie wall in this, the longest season he has pitched in his pro career. The numbers say otherwise. Hernandez lasted just three innings and allowed five runs in the Orioles' 8-4 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays, who had limped into Camden Yards as losers of their past 11. It was the second consecutive outing in which Hernandez failed to get at least 10 outs and the third straight in which he has allowed at least five runs.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 3, 2006
What happens when a tragic burnout meets a determined optimist? Well, we all know the answer to that, right? The optimist wins, the burnout is revived and all is well once again with the world. That's a pretty standard Hollywood formula, which makes 16 Blocks a pretty standard Hollywood picture. But in the capable hands of director Richard Donner (Die Hard) and screenwriter Richard Wenk, that's a very good thing - especially when the resulting movie marks an intriguing new chapter in an established actor's career and an exciting milestone in that of a relative newcomer.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
Christine Flanagan was considering giving up teaching fire prevention when a house fire changed her mind. "I wasn't sure the kids were getting anything out of it," she said recently. "Then one day after a house fire, the crew came back and said, `Chris, a little girl you taught saved her family's life.'" The child told the firefighters how Flanagan had taught her what to do in the event of a fire - get everybody out of the house and call 911. The fire could have been deadly if the child hadn't remembered Flanagan's lessons.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2005
Like many of her classmates at St. Paul's School for Girls, Carey Smith grew up playing lacrosse, but she loved the more adventurous sports her parents introduced her to, such as mountain biking, skiing and snowboarding. When Smith decided, as a high school freshman, that she had played enough lacrosse, it seemed fitting that she would turn to rowing. "I was kind of burnt out on lacrosse, so I wanted to try something new and that was totally different from any other sport I had played," said Smith, now a senior.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2003
John L. Cain, a 12-year veteran of the Baltimore City Council, announced yesterday that he would not seek a fourth term and that he was stepping down in part because he has become exhausted serving the 1st District in East Baltimore. "There is a burnout factor if somebody puts a lot into whatever they do, and that's how it's been with me," said Cain, 63, a former editor of the East Baltimore Guide and a Canton resident. "I just felt like it was time to go. I'm ready for some new challenges."
FEATURES
By Joe Sugarman | January 30, 1994
I must confess. I have been burdened by the weight of mysins for too long.Yes, it was I who rang your telephone and dragged you dripping from the shower. It was I who disrupted dinner, clamoring to caulk your driveway. And, it was I who called at the climax of "Citizen Kane" curious as to your brand of bathroom cleaner. But, please, have mercy. I was only doing my job.For I am the telemarketer -- expert in bad timing, professional of bad manners. Public enemy No. 1.Wait, wait. Before you slam down this article on me as you do your telephone receiver, let me try to explain just who I am and where I come from.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 15, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Pete Sampras remains too good too be true.He respects umpires, lauds opponents, signs autographs and obliges sponsors. In a more genteel age, none of this would be out of the ordinary. But after the contentious reigns of Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe, after gaudy appearance fees and seven-figure endorsement contracts eroded the game's structure, after the tennis boom and the tennis bust, Sampras still is the refreshing throwback all dressed up in white.Sampras would be excused for showing at least some signs of becoming a spoiled tennis brat surrounded by sycophants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
Ari Fleischer's announcement this past week that he will resign as President Bush's press secretary was greeted by many media as an extraordinary event, unexpected and worthy of page-one news. But Martha Joynt Kumar, a political science professor at Towson University and scholar on the curious, often antagonistic, relationship between the White House and the press who cover it, says no press secretary can last for long, especially in an age of 24-hour cable news and instant analysis. Kumar has studied the art of presidential communications for years, and two years ago, she wrote the White House 2002 Project, a 600-page briefing book for the incoming administration.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2002
THE WARNING signs are all over the place: Africa is once again facing famine. Drought has hit two places on the continent -- several countries in the south and Ethiopia further to the north. With politics and AIDS complicating matters, an estimated 20 million to 25 million people face a dire food crisis. "It is the longest drought [in southern Africa] in 20 years," says Howard Leathers, a professor of agriculture and resource economics at the University of Maryland, College Park. "It was compounded in an ironic way by hard rainfall during the harvest which made it impossible to get the crop out of the field."
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