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By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1998
Five Baltimore high school students have been honored by the mayor for rescuing two people, including a woman in a wheelchair, who were trapped in a burning building.The teen-agers, all of whom attend Forest Park High School, were walking home from classes Jan. 26 when they saw smoke pouring from a rowhouse in the 4000 block of Annellen Road in Northwest Baltimore.Duane Alexander, Desi Alexander, David Johnson, Jonathan Wilson and Terrell Patterson ran inside and helped the two occupants to safety from a smoke-filled first floor.
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NEWS
By Dee Wright | January 16, 2012
If it takes the proverbial village to raise a child, it takes that same village to protect the elderly. Where was Mary Hines' village from July 2011, when her electricity was turned off, until her body was discovered, stabbed, in her burning rowhouse on Jan. 5, 2012? The 84-year old retired teacher was found murdered in a burning house and left for firefighters to clean up the ashes of her human tragedy. If the financially burdened widow were as beloved and as respected by family, neighbors and church leaders as has been reported, did this "village" observe her darkened home and her inability to refrigerate and cook nutritious meals for seven months without a twinge of guilt?
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1996
Having flown an Army helicopter into enemy airspace over Iraq, Eric Feustel knew better than to think too hard before dashing into a burning Pikesville apartment building."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
The Howard County fire department has reinstituted a training program that sends firefighters into burning structures as realistic preparation for emergencies - bringing back a practice that it had stopped amid a spate of injuries nationwide and the 2007 death of a Baltimore fire recruit. Officials in Howard and around Maryland regard such training as valuable because the conditions are most like those that firefighters will face at the scene of a fire. The training, also used by Baltimore and Montgomery counties, usually is held at houses that are slated for demolition.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer Staff writer Traci M. Johnson contributed to this article | December 23, 1992
A two-alarm fire sent flames and smoke hundreds of feet into the evening sky as it destroyed a sawmill on Klee Mill Road about 4:55 p.m. yesterday.The fire, in one of two sawmills at Hoff Lumber Co., brought equipment from the Winfield, Sykesville, Gamber, Liberty Road, Westminster and West Friendship fire companies to battle the blaze in the 100-foot by 35-foot open building.Flames could be seen up to 10 miles away before firefighters got the blaze under control at 5:43 p.m., after running hoses from underground water tanks through pumper trucks to the fire.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2005
A raging fire fueled by foam materials destroyed a manufacturing building in the Brooklyn area late last night, sending workers running for safety. The blaze at the Life-Like Products facility on Chesapeake Avenue was reported about 10:30 p.m., and quickly went to four alarms as flames and thick black smoke rose from the large corrugated metal building. Nancy Leone, 54, said she was in the "screening room" packaging foam crates made in the building when Styrofoam insulation plugging a drafty spot nearby "started popping."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1999
Andrew P. Shows began fighting fires in Baltimore 44 years ago, and has risen to become the most senior battalion chief in the department. But he has now embarked on a new battle -- this time over his age and whether he is fit for work.The city says it's time Shows, 67, ended his career and retired. He was diagnosed with congestive heart disease in April 1998 after he woke up at home early one morning struggling to breathe.For all practical purposes, Shows is on unpaid leave. He spends some mornings at his old station house on Harford Road sipping coffee with his buddies -- though the city stopped paying him in April in hopes of forcing his retirement.
NEWS
October 28, 1992
Scholarships by legislators wasted moneyTwo commendations are in order pursuant to your lead editorial of Oct. 15.The Evening Sun is deserving of plaudits for your perseverance over the years in opposition to education patronage.And we should applaud the eight state delegates who have committed to oppose the program in the next session of the legislature.They are giving up a lucrative political plum at home, and their colleagues in Annapolis will shame them for their betrayal of their institution.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
A 40- by 70-foot wooden building used for refinishing furniture burned to the ground yesterday in a fire equal to three alarms.The building in the 5400 block of Buffalo Road, Mount Airy, carried the name Jack's Refinishing. There were four men inside when the fire erupted around a machine used in the refinishing procedure, according to Deputy State Fire Marshal Frank M. Rauschenberg.Jack Douglas operated the business in a building owned by his mother, Cathy Douglas, according to the deputy fire marshal.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2007
A state agency charged the Baltimore City Fire Department yesterday with "intentionally" and "knowingly" violating safety rules resulting in "a substantial probability [of] death or serious physical harm" during a Feb. 9 training exercise that killed a fire cadet. The Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, after a five-month investigation, cited the department for 33 safety violations and singled out two fire commanders for the haphazard planning and execution of the live burn that claimed the life of Racheal M. Wilson, 29, and injured two others in a vacant rowhouse on South Calverton Road in Southwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2011
Three Baltimore County police officers were ending their shift in the early morning hours of Halloween last year when they were dispatched to a house fire in Pikesville. There, a man in the yard yelled that his paralyzed father was trapped on the top floor. Officers Michael Forish, Michael Gerard Lynch and Zachary Small rushed into the house and found a 275-pound man in his bed, yelling for help. The three officers, gasping amid the smoke, carried him from the building as it began to collapse.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
The mayor gave firefighter Jeffrey Novack the medal of valor Thursday, and for a brief moment all was good in the city. Baltimore's chief executive joked about Novack's boyish appearance, his being just 23 years old and all, and already a hero. It was a perfect stage: the opening ceremony of the Firehouse Expo, which attracts thousands of firefighters from all over the country to Baltimore to learn better training and safety. Participants gave Novack a standing ovation as the shy young man stood in front of colleagues from departments in New York, Boston, Chicago and beyond.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | August 27, 2007
Lt. Samuel Darby sat on the roof of the burning building with a power saw. It was a live-burn exercise in a vacant West Baltimore rowhouse, and he was teaching cadets how to cut holes in the roof to give smoke and fire a way to escape. The heat scorched two knuckles on his right hand. Darby said his protective gloves were wet and didn't offer proper protection. An independent report raised the possibility that he might not have been wearing them at all. Either way, he was sidelined. So was one of the cadets, who was burned in the face when he broke safety protocols and removed his air mask.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2007
A state agency charged the Baltimore City Fire Department yesterday with "intentionally" and "knowingly" violating safety rules resulting in "a substantial probability [of] death or serious physical harm" during a Feb. 9 training exercise that killed a fire cadet. The Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, after a five-month investigation, cited the department for 33 safety violations and singled out two fire commanders for the haphazard planning and execution of the live burn that claimed the life of Racheal M. Wilson, 29, and injured two others in a vacant rowhouse on South Calverton Road in Southwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | February 13, 2007
Baltimore fire officials agreed yesterday to stop igniting city buildings for training - a practice rarely used in large Northeastern cities because it is widely considered unsafe - until an investigation into the death of a cadet is complete. A Fire Department spokesman also said that other training practices will be re-examined to avoid further tragedies. The cadet, Racheal Wilson, 29, died Friday in a fire set by her instructors in a vacant rowhouse on South Calverton Road that was in a block slated for demolition.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2005
A raging fire fueled by foam materials destroyed a manufacturing building in the Brooklyn area late last night, sending workers running for safety. The blaze at the Life-Like Products facility on Chesapeake Avenue was reported about 10:30 p.m., and quickly went to four alarms as flames and thick black smoke rose from the large corrugated metal building. Nancy Leone, 54, said she was in the "screening room" packaging foam crates made in the building when Styrofoam insulation plugging a drafty spot nearby "started popping."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | August 27, 2007
Lt. Samuel Darby sat on the roof of the burning building with a power saw. It was a live-burn exercise in a vacant West Baltimore rowhouse, and he was teaching cadets how to cut holes in the roof to give smoke and fire a way to escape. The heat scorched two knuckles on his right hand. Darby said his protective gloves were wet and didn't offer proper protection. An independent report raised the possibility that he might not have been wearing them at all. Either way, he was sidelined. So was one of the cadets, who was burned in the face when he broke safety protocols and removed his air mask.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 22, 1992
It might have been "no big deal," as Pete O'Connor himself said. It might have been a common practice in big-city fire departments, and something every firefighter in Baltimore knew and even took for granted.But it's something the public probably did not know -- I certainly never did -- and it just slipped out yesterday while O'Connor talked about his 38 years of service in the city Fire Department.When that big fire erupted at Henderson's Wharf in Fells Point a few years ago, O'Connor went inside the burning warehouse.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2004
MOSCOW - Thousands of Russian troops scoured the southern republic of Ingushetia yesterday for Chechen rebels suspected of overnight attacks that killed 57 people and burned several Russian government buildings. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said those responsible for the attacks, which began late Monday night and lasted into early yesterday morning, should be "found and destroyed." "Those whom it is possible to take alive we should hand over to the courts," Putin said. The attacks, the largest rebel operation in the Ingush region since war between separatists and Moscow erupted in Chechnya a decade ago, was another blow to Putin's claim that Russian forces were in control of the separatist region.
NEWS
February 9, 2003
Police in Montgomery County are investigating the death of a North Potomacwoman whose body was found inside a burning building yesterday in Rockville. Firefighters responding to a fire in a commercial building on West Montgomery Avenue discovered the body of Vanessa Yvette Johnson, 39, of the 14000 block of Masterpiece Lane. Police said Johnson was the owner of a consignment shop in the building. Johnson's injuries did not appear to be related to the fire, police said, and her death is being treated as a homicide.
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