Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBurma
IN THE NEWS

Burma

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 2, 1995
OPPOSITION LEADER, Aung San Suu Kyi, was both gutty and right in pulling her National League for Democracy from the on-again, off-again National Convention writing a constitution for Burma.That body was convened by, hand-picked by and represents the military junta, which overturned the 1990 election, arrested Mrs. Suu Kyi, suppressed dissent and brooks no real opposition. It goes by the acronym SLORC, for State Law and Order Restoration Council.One of the funnier proposed constitutional articles would ban top office to anyone married to a foreigner.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Dr. James Ellicott Tyson Hopkins, a retired thoracic surgeon and decorated World War II veteran who drew on his battlefield experience to advocate for the use of body armor, died of heart failure Monday at his home near Bel Air. He was 99. He served during World War II with a fabled unit, Merrill's Marauders, behind enemy lines in Burma. Born on his family's farm near Highland in Howard County, he was a descendant of Johns Hopkins, the Quaker philanthropist who founded the Baltimore hospital and university.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 18, 1991
Burma has been led by isolationists for so long that most of the world had all but forgotten its existence when, in 1989, its military rulers changed the country's name to Myanmar. The regime had come to power a year earlier, when widespread protests forced the resignation of U Ne Win, the country's dictatorial ruler for almost 30 years. Those protests brought to the fore a remarkable woman, who this week was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was born to leadership. Her father is regarded as the founder of modern Burma and would almost certainly have served as its first prime minister had he not been assassinated in 1947, only months before the country became free of British rule.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 24, 2012
What people go through to live their lives — war and terror, disease and pain, poverty and hunger, long journeys across continents and oceans, loss and heartbreak — always leaves me awed and humbled. You hear a story, like the one I'm offering this Christmas, and you want to raise a glass to that thing we call human spirit. Milla Dawt Hniang, who travels with crutches and guitar, has it in bunches. It has taken her 20 years past the age when her parents thought she would die. She's a Burmese-born singer-songwriter about to release her first CD and send more music of the American country-pop variety — think Taylor Swift — into the world.
NEWS
February 25, 1994
Burma (now officially called Myanmar) is a backward, isolated, impoverished country missing the economic prosperity of its neighbors because its military junta keeps it that way.The State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC) knows it is the problem -- not the slender and eloquent woman who has been kept under house arrest four-and-a-half years. Yet the SLORC's sensitivity to its isolation and its desire for a better reputation led it to lift the curtain just enough to allow her first non-family, non-SLORC visitors: Rep. Bill Richardson, D-N.M.
NEWS
By Richard D. Lyons and Richard D. Lyons,New York Times News Service | January 23, 1994
Allan G. Odell, who developed the roadside advertising campaign of rhyming jingles for Burma Shave that became a fixture of rural America for almost 40 years, died Monday at his home in Edina, Minn. He was 90.The cause was "just old age" said his son George.Fresh out of college in 1925, Mr. Odell joined a patent medicine company, Burma Vita Inc., which was operated by his father, Clinton.The elder Odell had just come up with a formula for a brushless shave cream, and Allan won his father's approval to spend $200 on an innovative advertising campaign.
NEWS
October 3, 2005
The National League for Democracy was legitimately elected to power by a landslide15 years ago in Myanmar, the too often forgotten nation better known as Burma. For most of that time, the NLD's leader, Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, has been kept under detention by a military junta. Also for most of that time, the United Nations has been dispatching special envoys to engage the Burmese generals on their human-rights violations, drug trade and role in spreading AIDs - without success. A stronger U.N. effort to save Myanmar is long overdue.
BUSINESS
By Lauren Weber and Lauren Weber,NEWSDAY | March 20, 2004
The official merchandise Web site for President Bush's re-election campaign has sold clothing made in Burma, whose goods were banned by him from the United States last year to punish its military dictatorship. The merchandise sold on the Web site georgebushstore.com includes a $49.95 fleece pullover, embroidered with the Bush-Cheney '04 logo and bearing a label stating it was made in Burma, now Myanmar. The jacket was sent to Newsday as part of an order that included a shirt made in Mexico and a hat not bearing a country-of-origin label.
NEWS
July 25, 1996
MYANMAR, as Burma's rulers call the country, passed no human rights test to win observer status from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), or membership in its ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF) on security. The ASEAN members are vigorous economies but not model democracies themselves. Singapore led the charge for legitimizing the reclusive military dictatorship, partly because Singapore investment is developing the country. A second motive is to wean Burma from mighty China.To its credit, the ruling State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC)
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1997
Zaw Zawmyintthein, a career diplomat and former ambassador for Burma who immigrated to the United States and settled in Baltimore County 18 years ago, died of complications during open- heart surgery Friday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 82.Abbreviating his name in this country to U Zaw-Win, he was known affectionately as "Mr. Z" in the White Marsh neighborhood where he lived. He became a U.S. citizen in 1976 after serving in the diplomatic corps for the former Burma, now known as Myanmar.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
A reporter inquires about the way we refer to U.S. Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, because his staff says that he prefers to be known as plain old Ben Cardin. (He's running for re-election.) Can we do that? Sure. We're easy. We accommodated Jimmy Carter and Bob Dole, so Ben Cardin should be no strain.  Our practice at The Baltimore Sun  is to refer to people by the names they choose to use for public purposes. So we indulge k.d. lang and bell hooks in their typographical eccentricities* as well as just-plain-folks seekers of public office. Sometimes people change their names formally for purposes of being listed on the ballot, as did American Joe Miedusiewski, a former Maryland state senator.
NEWS
By Elaine Pearson | October 2, 2009
In June, Gaithersburg resident Kyaw Zaw Lwin traveled from Thailand to New York to deliver a petition to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's special adviser on Burma. The petition, with 680,000 signatures, called on the secretary-general to exert pressure for the release of more than 2,000 political prisoners. Now, in a tragic twist - and as the Obama administration moves forward with a new policy of increased engagement with Burma - Mr. Zaw Lwin, a U.S. citizen who often goes by the name Nyi Nyi Aung, has disappeared into a Burmese jail cell himself.
NEWS
December 27, 2006
BO MYA, 79 Myanmar guerrilla leader Bo Mya, longtime leader of Myanmar's largest guerrilla group, died early Sunday in a Thai hospital. Bo Mya most recently held the title of defense minister in the Karen National Union, which has fought for autonomy since Myanmar - formerly known as Burma - gained independence in 1948.
NEWS
July 16, 2006
Joseph F. Hejduk Sr., who worked on the Titan I missile program and the Gemini project at Martin Marietta Corp., died of pneumonia July 7 at Lorien Riverside Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Belcamp. He was 84 and had lived in Overlea. Born in East Baltimore, Mr. Hejduk was raised on Curley Street and graduated from Baltimore public schools. In 1942, he entered the Army, serving in World War II in China, Burma and India as a military policeman. After the war, he went to work at Martin Marietta as an aircraft electrical planner.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
The decision by the United States last week to increase pressure on Myanmar by seeking a U.N. Security Council resolution against its continuing human rights abuses is necessary and laudable. But the negative reactions of key world powers to the U.S. diplomatic escalation are distressingly toothless. China, Russia and, shockingly, Japan reportedly argued in a closed Security Council meeting last Wednesday that the lack of political freedoms in the country formerly known as Burma doesn't pose a threat to world security - and therefore doesn't meet the test for such a resolution.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
To the list of forces that can trigger a global pandemic of avian flu - such as mutating viruses and migrating birds - some scientists add another: regimes that that trample human rights. Early in March, the deadly H5N1 flu strain appeared in chickens on a farm in rural Burma, a nation ruled by a military junta since 1962 and embroiled in a series of civil wars with ethnic separatists since it gained independence in 1948. The reclusive government, which calls the country Myanmar, delayed reporting the H5N1 outbreak to the public and to international health authorities for eight days.
NEWS
By Elaine Pearson | October 2, 2009
In June, Gaithersburg resident Kyaw Zaw Lwin traveled from Thailand to New York to deliver a petition to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's special adviser on Burma. The petition, with 680,000 signatures, called on the secretary-general to exert pressure for the release of more than 2,000 political prisoners. Now, in a tragic twist - and as the Obama administration moves forward with a new policy of increased engagement with Burma - Mr. Zaw Lwin, a U.S. citizen who often goes by the name Nyi Nyi Aung, has disappeared into a Burmese jail cell himself.
NEWS
By Dennis Bernstein and Leslie Kean | July 26, 1998
Two Akha girls taken from their rural village by Burmese troops and used as army porters could not have imagined the lethal brutality they would face during their forced internment. A 61-year-old village headman of the Akha ethnic minority living in Burma's eastern highlands told Amnesty International that he knew both girls and spoke with them after they were released by government soldiers.He said 15-year-old Mia Au and 16-year-old Mi She were "happy, healthy girls" before they were kidnapped.
NEWS
October 3, 2005
The National League for Democracy was legitimately elected to power by a landslide15 years ago in Myanmar, the too often forgotten nation better known as Burma. For most of that time, the NLD's leader, Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, has been kept under detention by a military junta. Also for most of that time, the United Nations has been dispatching special envoys to engage the Burmese generals on their human-rights violations, drug trade and role in spreading AIDs - without success. A stronger U.N. effort to save Myanmar is long overdue.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.