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NEWS
April 28, 2014
In response to Katherine Ambrose's complaints about the timing of The Sun's coverage of the MICA exhibit on Baltimore burlesque ( "Was Easter the right time for a two-age spread on burlesque in The Sun?" April 22), I suppose the paper should also refrain from reporting about murders and rape on religious holidays as well. Or anything this dear lady might find distasteful? Oh, I forgot. Murder and mayhem is fine but a woman's breasts are unacceptable! Who will think of the children?
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2014
The closet of an empowered female stretches further than a gray pantsuit. For Hamilton resident Ruby Rockafella, female empowerment includes fake eyelashes, wigs, drag makeup and even waist cinchers. Rockafella, 31, is a burlesque performer and one of the founding members of Baltimore's newest burlesque troupe, Bawdy Shop Burlesque. Contrary to social construction, burlesque is a raw art form that allows women to explore and celebrate themselves, explained Rockafella. "As girls, we grow up being told what length of skirt is appropriate, when it's OK to speak up, that we have to be 'proper,'" she said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Sunny Sighed remembers her first exposure to modern burlesque very well. She loved it, but never dreamed she'd soon be a part of it. Stripping off her clothes in front of an audience - well, even for a performer trained in acting, singing and dancing, that seemed a bit much. "I at first could not imagine being able to do it myself," she says of the night about eight years ago when she first saw local legends Trixie Little and the Evil Hate Monkey (real names: Beatrix Burneston and Adam Krandle)
NEWS
April 28, 2014
In response to Katherine Ambrose's complaints about the timing of The Sun's coverage of the MICA exhibit on Baltimore burlesque ( "Was Easter the right time for a two-age spread on burlesque in The Sun?" April 22), I suppose the paper should also refrain from reporting about murders and rape on religious holidays as well. Or anything this dear lady might find distasteful? Oh, I forgot. Murder and mayhem is fine but a woman's breasts are unacceptable! Who will think of the children?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Once the Queen of Baltimore burlesque, Fannie Belle Fleming — better known as Blaze Starr — has been living the quiet life in rural West Virginia for more than 30 years now, far away from the blinking neon signs, barkers and strippers of The Block. The Block was her venue, where she reigned supreme for more than 20 years. She is still fondly remembered by generations of gents, sans wife or girlfriend, traveling salesmen and servicemen all out for a night on the town, and for the rose petals that she gently blew across her ample bosom to admiring audiences from the runway of her Two O'Clock Club.
FEATURES
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2003
Arts and history buff Kara Mae Harris and college just didn't mix. But when the Prince George's County native dropped out of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in 2000, she didn't retreat to her parent's house in Beltsville. Instead, the feisty 18-year-old quickly moved to the city and got a full-time job. "I fled to Baltimore as soon as I got the chance," said Harris, now 22 and working as an administrative assistant for a downtown temp agency. For her, the old port town was more authentic and down-to-earth than stuffy Washington, a city where she'd whiled away many hapless teen-age nights.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
It isn't right for Jean Honus to be all alone on Barney Street.The house is quiet; hours are long.And there's no action.Not like the days when men gave her diamond watches just because they liked the way she moved.When strangers by the hundreds whooped and hollered and whistled as she sashayed her knockout figure across a stage.Back when Jean Honus did the striptease on Baltimore's Block in the glory days of burlesque.The theaters and musicians, the bookies, the barkers, the wise guys, the prizefighters and the straight men, all gone.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
In the raspy voice of an inveterate club hopper, the performer known professionally as Dirty Martini explains how she came to be a burlesque sensation at Manhattan venues with names like the Va Va Voom Room and the Slipper Room. "I was told my whole life that I would never be right in any way for dance," says Martini, who claims to be the first fan dancer to perform in postwar Sarajevo. "I just had a burning desire to do that. There was nothing else I could do, except find a way I could be a dancer."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | January 27, 1991
As a middle-vintage baby boomer, I'm too young to have seen burlesque . . . err . . . in the flesh, but I sure got a delightful dose of it at the Annapolis Dinner Theater's production of "Sugar Babies."Sexy, incessant, unsubtle, anarchic, off-color, peppy, physical -- pick an adjective you like and enjoy, because this is a show and a cast that will "give ya that boom-boom right in the eye" and leave you wanting more.The "Top Banana" emcee role in "Sugar Babies" is truly a license to steal, and Dan Higgs is a larcenist of the first order.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Katie Leslie and Katie Leslie,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
What's more American than apple pie? How about apple pie with a side of burlesque? If this sounds like more fun than fireworks, check out Trixie Little's Stars and Stripes Show on Saturday at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson. Charm City's own burlesque star, Trixie Little, is slated to perform with her sidekick, the Evil Tap-Dancing Hate Monkey, and New York's "World Famous Pontani Sisters" at a show with a July Fourth theme. "This show is going to be lots of fun, like the seedy side of Mayberry," says Little, also known as Keri Burneston, 28, who along with her boyfriend, 25-year-old Adam Krandle, created the characters of superhero Trixie and her foil, the Hate Monkey, almost three years ago. "There will be lots of acrobatics, tap dance and lots of comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Sunny Sighed remembers her first exposure to modern burlesque very well. She loved it, but never dreamed she'd soon be a part of it. Stripping off her clothes in front of an audience - well, even for a performer trained in acting, singing and dancing, that seemed a bit much. "I at first could not imagine being able to do it myself," she says of the night about eight years ago when she first saw local legends Trixie Little and the Evil Hate Monkey (real names: Beatrix Burneston and Adam Krandle)
TRAVEL
By Theresa Sintetos, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
New York City Orchid show Seven thousand orchids, the largest curated orchid show in the country, will be displayed in the Victorian-style glasshouse at the New York Botanical Garden. The show runs Saturday through April 22, and on Saturdays, music from around the world will be featured - representing the regions where the orchids originate. The Orchid Show starts Saturday and runs through April 22 at the New York Botanical Gardens. The gardens are open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
Elvis will not be leaving the building Saturday. Nor will any of the other contestants in Elvis' Birthday Fight Club, a combination battle-to-the-finish boxing grudge match and burlesque show where past champions have included a chicken and a vibrating robot. "We like to think of ourselves as either burlesque-plus or theater-minus," explains Elvis' Birthday Fight Club (we'll go by EBFC from here on) founder-promoter-participant Jared Davis, who is bringing his creation to Highlandtown's Creative Alliance at the Patterson for the second straight year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
Carl Leo Dietrich, who had been chairman of the music department at what is now McDaniel College and later was a founder of the Columbia Orchestra, died May 24 of a fall at his Naples, Fla., home. The former Columbia resident was 85. "His influence of joyful exuberance is still very much a part of the spirit of music-making here in the department today," said Dr. Margaret Boudreaux, who succeeded Mr. Dietrich as department chair in 1991. "He was my immediate predecessor as chair, and the person that hired me," said Dr. Boudreaux.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
The "Jaws" theme music plays over the Windup Space's sound system as a short, striking young woman stretches out on stage in a shimmering green mermaid costume. Buh-duh. Buh-duh. The woman stays very still, until she notices it - a five-foot-long shark, bearing its teeth and wagging its fin, floating directly above the pasties-adorned mermaid. And then the crowd, along with the night's model, Little Luna, erupts with laughter. It's just another Monday night at Dr. Sketchy's Anti-Art School, the burlesque-meets-life-drawing session that normally takes place the second and fourth weeks of every month at the Station North bar. This Monday, GiGi Holliday of Sticky Buns Burlesque will take the stage at 7 p.m. And in June, the Baltimore chapter - co-created and run by Mount Vernon's Alexis de la Rosa, 32, and Aaron Bush, 36 - will celebrate its fourth anniversary.
ENTERTAINMENT
Laura Lefavor | September 21, 2011
By day she is Lily Hindrew, but by night she is burlesque seductress Nona Narcisse. The 26-year-old from Santa Fe, N.M., is one of the producers of Slow Burn Burlesque, a professional dance and variety show based in New Orleans. Once a fashion student, Hindrew now makes most of her own smoldering costumes and helps create the props and sets for Slow Burn. Next month you can see her as the featured model at one of Dr. Sketchy's live drawing sessions, or catch her performing with Gilded Lily Burlesque at the Ottobar . Here she give us the scoop on some of life's necessities: pizza, friends and lots and lots of sequins.
NEWS
By Cynthia Bournellis and Cynthia Bournellis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 12, 1999
HELENDALE, Calif. -- In the middle of the desert, by the Mojave River and the Santa Fe railroad, past meets present as people from all walks of life gather to honor a lost art form. The place is Exotic World. The art is burlesque.The Miss Exotic World Competition and StripTease Reunion, held annually on the first weekend in June, is an exercise in nostalgia and a chance to see some of burlesque's legends strut their stuff. It is also an opportunity to romanticize the past and deplore the present state of striptease.
FEATURES
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | February 14, 2006
Before the backstage mirror, barely dressed dancers fret about limp curls, gooseflesh and uneven panty fringe. But Catherine Bohne stands apart from them in her four-inch-high Mary Janes, contemplating a more serious problem: Her cat ate her pasties. It happened about 11:30 p.m. Friday, the eve of this, her first-ever burlesque performance, when the two red, sparkly stars were to be all that stood between her and total toplessness. She discovered their mangled remains on the floor of the spare bedroom, cursed out the cat and despaired.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
This has been a good year for Baltimore representation in the New York theater scene. In March, Trixie Little and the Evil Hate Monkey, the madcap acrobatic burlesque performers known for any number of adventures in Charm City, had their first off-Broadway show. This month, Michael Patrick Flanagan Smith, who directed some Baltimore ventures for that duo years ago, saw his play "Woody Guthrie Dreams" open off-off-Broadway. Although the Trixie/Monkey production of "All or Nothing" at the Ars Nova Theater was only for two weeks, a taste of it can be savored soon in an episode of "Unleashed by Garo" — that's fanciful fashion designer Garo Sparo — scheduled to air Sept.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
Kristin Weisman loves a look that's "kind of bohemian, but at the same time, really feminine. I like girly things that have a little funk to them." Her style mirrors her professional life. The 30-year-old Parkville resident is an English teacher at Kenwood High School, a part-time burlesque performer with the Gilded Lily troupe, and a part-time yoga instructor. We "glimpsed" Weisman at another of her part-time gigs — as a hostess at Hampden's hip Rocket to Venus restaurant — in a navy rayon Sine romper and a wide segmented brown leather belt — both from Anthropologie.
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