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By Deborah I. Greene and Deborah I. Greene,Carroll County Bureau of The Sun | October 7, 1991
Not much has disturbed the peace of Col. William Jordan since the Revolutionary War hero was laid to rest more thanTC century ago beneath a mulberry bush in the middle of a Carroll County field.Like the resting places of other county forefathers, there was little more than the distant rumbling of a farmer's tractor around planting time to break the stillness of this abandoned gravesite.That is, not until now.Mystic Kane Manor, a 22-lot subdivision, soon will sprout up around the 19th century gravesite of Colonel Jordan, and developers plan more houses in a field across Route 32 near Nicodemus Road.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2011
A gal with a meat cleaver embedded in her head. A living skeleton. Lots of witches, with pointy hats and long noses. And plenty of guys dressed like your host for the evening, the estimable author and, though dead for 162 years, favorite son of old Baltimore, Mr. Edgar Allan Poe. Such was the scene Sunday night at the Westminster Hall and Burying Grounds. Hundreds gathered to tour the centuries-old cemetery and catacombs, be entertained by one of its most famous residents — that would be Poe, buried here after dying in Baltimore under still-unexplained circumstances in 1849 — and, not coincidentally, do their part to help the home he once lived in remain open as a museum and tourist attraction.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2002
MEMBERS OF the Coalition to Protect Maryland Burial Sites met at the Blue Point Grill in Ellicott City on April 20 for the coalition's annual meeting. About 35 members from throughout the state ate a buffet brunch, heard guest speakers talk about Maryland cemeteries, and then visited two Baltimore cemeteries. The coalition, a nonprofit organization based in Ellicott City, was founded in 1991 and is involved in "educational advocacy for burial sites," said Kristin Kraske, who has been president for two years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2011
For years, St. Paul's Cemetery, a Victorian city of the dead on a knoll in a remote corner of Druid Hill Park, was nothing more than a nearly forgotten, weed-choked, overgrown burial ground that had been subjected to mindless vandalism through the decades. Today, it's brimming with new life as volunteers and members of Martini Lutheran Church man humming lawn mowers and screaming chainsaws as they cut grass and remove felled trees. Their common goal is to restore the cemetery, which dates to 1854, to its former glory.
NEWS
July 8, 1992
Cemetery cartoon 'trashy'From: Barbara SiegEllicott CityAnother idol has fallen! Never would I have expected to see on the pages of the Howard County Sun the insensitive, irresponsible and offensive cartoon relating to the bulldozing of St. Mary's Cemetery that appeared in the Sunday, July 5, edition especially after the excellent reporting of the tragic and outrageous events at the cemetery by your staff writer James M. Coram.Such trashy journalism is to be expected of the supermarket tabloids, not of our county bureau of The Sun. You owe a public apology to your readers, and especially to:* The families of those buried at St. Mary's Cemetery.
TRAVEL
By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Tribune Newspapers | September 13, 2009
'Memphis & the Delta Blues Trail' Countryman Press, $19.95: Anyone who loves the blues and rock 'n' roll will love this guide. Authors Melissa Gage and Justin Gage describe in loving detail both well-known and obscure locations, including the best places to hear authentic blues. They begin their journey in Memphis, the birthplace of rock 'n' roll, and include stops at such sites as Beale Street in the heart of Memphis, Elvis Presley's Graceland as well as several music studios and museums: Stax Museum of American Soul Music, Sun Studio and the W.C. Handy House Museum.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
Columbia's first and only cemetery apparently is getting a longer lease on life.Columbia Memorial Park owner Harvey Geller and the Rouse Co., the developer of the unincorporated city, are working out plans to expand the 5-year-old cemetery by about 10 acres, which would provide enough burial space to accommodate an additional generation of people, Mr. Geller said."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
State officials and preservationists are trying to publicize the location of every cemetery in Maryland to keep people from building over them - accidentally or on purpose. They hope to compile computer databases pinpointing graveyards in each county, designed specifically for local officials who issue development permits. Activists say the effort should help protect graves, especially those in old cemeteries no longer maintained by families, churches or companies, which are particularly vulnerable.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
State officials and preservationists are trying to publicize the location of every cemetery in Maryland to keep people from building over them - accidentally or on purpose. They hope to compile computer databases pinpointing graveyards in each county, designed specifically for local officials who issue development permits. Activists say the effort should help protect graves, especially those in old cemeteries no longer maintained by families, churches or companies, which are particularly vulnerable.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | August 25, 1992
Karen Dattilio devotes a good chunk of her daylight hours to the dead.She tries to find and protect their overlooked graves -- out of appreciation for their historical and cultural significance and respect for the living heirs. A current member and past president of the Carroll County Genealogical Society, the Westminster resident is an advocate for the deceased."I work nights and save cemeteries by day," she said about her job as a medical lab technologist and her passion for researching, detecting and recording old graveyards.
TRAVEL
By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Tribune Newspapers | September 13, 2009
'Memphis & the Delta Blues Trail' Countryman Press, $19.95: Anyone who loves the blues and rock 'n' roll will love this guide. Authors Melissa Gage and Justin Gage describe in loving detail both well-known and obscure locations, including the best places to hear authentic blues. They begin their journey in Memphis, the birthplace of rock 'n' roll, and include stops at such sites as Beale Street in the heart of Memphis, Elvis Presley's Graceland as well as several music studios and museums: Stax Museum of American Soul Music, Sun Studio and the W.C. Handy House Museum.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | October 16, 2007
William McKenrick died of cancer on a December morning in 2004, three days before his 71st birthday. His wife of 51 years, Barbara McKenrick, has not had a moment of peace since. And neither, she worries, has he. Mrs. McKenrick's troubles started when she went to Glen Haven Memorial Park in Glen Burnie to inquire about her husband's burial. To her surprise, she was told that the spaces the couple had picked out and paid for almost 10 years in advance weren't ready. Glen Haven offered to temporarily place her husband's body in a not-so-final resting place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2004
An article in last Sunday's Arts & Society section may have given a misimpression about the holder of a Maryland sportfishing record. In 1980, the late George H.W. Pierson of Baltimore landed the heaviest white marlin on record in state waters. Charles Kratz of West Friendship, who was featured in the article, was captain and owner of the boat, The Five C's, on which Pierson made his catch. Charlie Kratz is one lucky man. As the native of Highlandtown looks back over his 80 years - something he has had ample occasion to do lately - he feels as if he's watching a film so good he has no idea where to stop for highlights.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Philip Berrigan's grave sits inside an overgrown West Baltimore cemetery, giving inspiration to members of Jonah House who continue to protest war, violence and U.S. military spending from a house they built there. Eight years ago, Jonah House's war resisters, led by Berrigan and his wife, Elizabeth McAlister, became the official caretakers of St. Peter's graveyard, the final resting place of former parishioners of St. Peter the Apostle Roman Catholic Church, at Hollins and Poppleton streets.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
The grass is clipped and a new fence surrounds the small cemetery on Rattlesnake Ridge, where Joan H. Porterfield collects a few sticks and trash from around her great-great-great-grandparents' graves. This restored plot encompasses the Richards family burying ground - the probable resting place of Edward Richards, an English Quaker whose family founded the town of Hampstead, beginning with 50 acres granted to him in 1739 by Lord Baltimore. The cemetery - circa 1750 to 1870 - lies on a grassy knoll with two new schools, and single-family homes and condominiums are under construction around it. The graveyard is to be rededicated at 2 p.m. Sunday in a ceremony that will include several Richards descendants.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
The grass is clipped and a new fence surrounds the small cemetery on Rattlesnake Ridge, where Joan H. Porterfield collects a few sticks and trash from around her great-great-great-grandparents' graves. This restored plot encompasses the Richards family burying ground - the probable resting place of Edward Richards, an English Quaker whose family founded the town of Hampstead, beginning with 50 acres granted to him in 1739 by Lord Baltimore. The cemetery - circa 1750 to 1870 - lies on a grassy knoll with two new schools, and single-family homes and condominiums are under construction around it. The graveyard is to be rededicated at 2 p.m. Sunday in a ceremony that will include several Richards descendants.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
State officials and preservationists are trying to publicize the location of every cemetery in Maryland to keep people from building over them - accidentally or on purpose. They hope to compile computer databases pinpointing graveyards in each county, designed specifically for local officials who issue development permits. Activists say the effort should help protect graves, especially those in old cemeteries no longer maintained by families, churches or companies, which are particularly vulnerable.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1999
Jean W. Keenan wishes that people would think about graveyards year-round, not just on Halloween.If only they paid more attention, she says, no Maryland grave would be forgotten, vandalized, desecrated, or bulldozed to make way for development.If only they cared, she, as president of the Ellicott City-based Coalition to Protect Maryland Burial Sites, wouldn't have to work quite so hard all the time, or worry quite so much about it.But Keenan hears about gravesite problems, of one kind or another, all the time.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2002
MEMBERS OF the Coalition to Protect Maryland Burial Sites met at the Blue Point Grill in Ellicott City on April 20 for the coalition's annual meeting. About 35 members from throughout the state ate a buffet brunch, heard guest speakers talk about Maryland cemeteries, and then visited two Baltimore cemeteries. The coalition, a nonprofit organization based in Ellicott City, was founded in 1991 and is involved in "educational advocacy for burial sites," said Kristin Kraske, who has been president for two years.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2001
Tucked between an asphalt plant and a construction company on Guilford Road in Howard County is the burial site of Kings. They are the Kings who married into the Whites, one of the oldest - and, as surprised county officials now know, proudest - families in all of Maryland. From far and wide, descendants of the Whites and Kings swarmed the county this week - not for a wedding, not for a funeral, but to protect the honor of their family. Their common foe: a road project. As part of a planned widening of Guilford Road between Interstate 95 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, county officials have tentatively decided to cut about 30 feet into an open lot across from the Dorsey Run Business Center.
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