Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBurgundy
IN THE NEWS

Burgundy

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By MICHAEL DRESSER | February 27, 1994
Give Jean-Francois Bouchard credit for guts.The managing director of the large Burgundy shipping firm Bouchard Pere & Fils breezed into Baltimore this month with a boatload of Burgundy -- not just his own but those of his fellow producers.He was ready to take on all comers in a blind tasting, and the rivals he chose were no mere sparring partners. They were the heavyweights of Burgundy -- renowned small producers such as Armand Girardin and Henri Jayer, highly respected fellow shippers such as Louis Jadot and Joseph Drouhin and even the Domaine de la Romanee-Conti, the region's most famous estate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2014
From: California Price: $5 Serve: Pizza, pasta, chili, hamburgers Yes, Gallo Hearty Burgundy. You got a problem with that? This iconic wine, which led Gallo's move away from sweet fortified wines and into the realm of table wine, is celebrating its 50 t h anniversary. For as long as I can remember it's been a superb value. In 1972, "Time" put the wine on its cover and called it the best wine value in the United States. Not much has changed. It offers generous fruit, vinified dry, and a soft texture.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | January 6, 1991
When you think about wine bargains, about the last place you think of is Burgundy.It is a region whose name -- whether you use the English Burgundy or the French Bourgogne -- is synonymous with expensive. The best Burgundies, red or white, can fetch $300 a bottle, and even a so-so wine that bears a famous village name can set you back more than $30. With no other region is extravagant spending less of a guarantee of quality in the bottle.With Burgundy's whites, that poses only minor problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2011
The Santa Lucia Highlands area of California is an increasingly reliable source of fine wines, including pinot noir. This well-made example offers full-bodied, lush fruit with hints of black cherry and blackberries. Its creamy texture is very Californian, but it has earthy, herbal notes that hark back to Burgundy. From: Santa Lucia Highlands, Calif. Price: $25 Serve with: Red meat, tuna steak, roast poultry
FEATURES
By Susan Kaye and Susan Kaye,Contributing Writer | July 26, 1992
The thin bicycle tires spun through puddles, spewing water like a fountain run amok on the 24 cyclists sloshing past the celebrated red wine vineyards of Nuits-St-Georges.It was a sodden, chilly day that cyclists could do without. Yet, with zeppelin-gray clouds hovering above the Burgundian vineyards, the let's-wait-for-the-weather-to-clear tactic wasn't an option.Rain, though, doesn't dampen cyclists' spirits nearly as much as it does those of tourists contending with umbrellas, foggy windows and the option of spending the day inside a museum.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | February 1, 1998
Burgundy is not a wine region that is usually associated with great value.Through most of the 1970s and 1980s, in fact, no famous wine region of France gave poorer return on the consumer's wine dollar.That appears to be changing -- at least for now. No, Burgundy producers are not slashing their prices, but they do not appear to be raising them as aggressively as their compatriots in many other regions. The dollar is strong -- always a plus for devotees of French wines.Meanwhile, nature has brought the region known to the French as Bourgogne a string of fine vintages.
NEWS
February 22, 1994
POLICE LOG* Town Center: 10400 block of Little Patuxent Parkway: A burgundy 1987 Oldsmobile Cutlass with Maryland tags YZG 206 was stolen from the Columbia Mall parking lot Thursday.
NEWS
March 5, 1996
Police logTown Center: 5500 block of Sterrett Place: A burgundy 1988 Toyota Cressida with temporary Maryland tags was stolen Saturday or Sunday, police said.Pub Date: 3/05/96
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | July 5, 1995
Once again, Rodet's regional pinot noir is the finest value in red Burgundy. I've been touting this wine since 1990, but this might be the best vintage yet. Its exuberant fruitiness delights the palate, and its structure and acidity mark it as a true Burgundy. This light- to medium-bodied wine isn't complex or nuanced, but it delivers straightforward pinot noir flavor with no punches pulled. This delicious summertime red puts most $15- $20 red Burgundies with more prestigious village names to shame.
NEWS
October 18, 1993
POLICE LOG* Ellicott City: 3700 block of Valerie Carol Court: A burglar who entered through an unlocked door was scared away when a resident yelled at him on Tuesday afternoon.7700 block of Waterloo Road: A Burgundy 1986 Chrysler Lebaron with Maryland tags YGC42 was stolen between Monday and Wednesday, police said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
City police are searching for the occupants of a burgundy van with temporary tags who witnesses say took a man from his front porch Wednesday night. A witness told police that the man was sitting on his front porch in the 2300 block of Lauretta Ave. when the van pulled up and several people with guns forced the man from his porch into the van, said Agent Donny Moses, Police Department spokesman. Moses said homicide is investigating, which is standard procedure in an abduction investigation.
TRAVEL
By Doyle McManus and Doyle McManus,Los Angeles Times | October 21, 2007
The winemakers of Beaujolais are not happy this year. That seems odd, considering they live in some of France's most beautiful villages, where old stone houses are decked with flowers amid hillside vineyards heavy with grapes, a half-day's drive south of Paris. But to hear the growers tell it, the world is in a perilous state. New wines from Australia are flooding the market, even in France. The cost of labor -- each grower hires students, retirees and migrant workers to pick the grapes -- keeps going up every fall.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | November 29, 2006
Kurt Erickson Wine manager Beltway Fine Wine and Spirits, Towson Salary --$18 an hour Age --26 Years on the job --One How he got started --Erickson graduated from Purdue University with a degree in food science. He worked as a wine technician while at Purdue. The university is involved in wine-growing research to help Indiana's wine industry. He then worked as an assistant winemaker in Ohio and later in Florida. He said he took the Towson wine manager's job because he was looking for greater responsibility and more opportunity to learn.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | December 1, 2004
It is usually easier to admire the red wines of Burgundy than to recommend them. Burgundy, known in French as Bourgogne, is one of the world's most renowned wine regions. Its name has been heartily hijacked by pretenders from all around the world - most notoriously by Gallo. True burgundy has a style all its own among the red wines of the world - seldom approximated even by those who lovingly cultivate the pinot noir grape. It depends less on concentration than finesse to make its point, and when it is at its peak, it ripples across the palate with a suppleness that few other wines of the world can match.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | March 6, 2002
Pinot noir is to a restaurant wine list what an infielder who can play three positions is to a baseball team: invaluable. Wines made from the classic Burgundy grape have a versatility you don't find in cabernet sauvignon or merlot. They can span the gap between your salmon and your companion's steak. They have an extra measure of acidity that pairs well with grilled foods. Their relatively light tannins make them pleasant to drink young. At their best, whether from Burgundy or from the American West, they can be sublime.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
It took eight months and more than 100 bricklayers, but the last of 1.2 million burgundy-colored bricks has been cemented into place at the Ravens stadium, giving the project its most distinctive visual signature.Designers of the $220 million stadium hope the brick will both integrate the structure with nearby Oriole Park and give it a flourish that will be copied in other cities.But at least for the time being, it will stand alone. Despite baseball's enthusiastic embrace of brick facades, the Ravens' is the first football stadium in decades to use the graceful, but pricey siding.
NEWS
August 29, 1995
POLICE LOG* Wilde Lake: 5900 block of Turnabout Lane: A burglar broke a vacant apartment's rear sliding glass door and stole a microwave oven Thursday or Friday, police said.* Town Center: 10300 block of Little Patuxent Parkway: A burgundy, 1989 Pontiac Grand Am with Maryland tags EZ CUT was stolen Friday, police said.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | March 15, 1998
Sometimes life actually does get better in America. Sometimes now is clearly superior to then. Sometimes progress doesn't exact a horrific price.Consider beer. A decade ago, foreigners pitied us and our bland national brands. Now it seems that every county seat has a microbrewery that puts the Bavarians to shame.Consider cars. Fifteen years ago, you bought an American automobile as a patriotic sacrifice. Now you buy them because they're well-made.In the world of wine, consider California pinot noir.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.