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Burglar Alarm

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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young is calling for increased scrutiny of the city's False Alarm Reduction Program, which he says is partly responsible for the city government's seizure of thousands of homes. "People [can rack up] thousands of dollars in false alarms," said Lester Davis, Young's spokesman. "The city can seize your home over unpaid bills. You want the city to have some teeth, but you also want to be smart. If someone is not paying, does it make sense to take someone's home and now the city is responsible for another vacant property?"
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
An Anne Arundel County officer shot at a suspect after police encountered a car heist in progress in Hanover early Wednesday morning. Police said officers went to Baltimore Washington Auto Outlet in the 2700 block of Annapolis Road at around 12:30 a.m. after the building's burglar alarm was triggered. Two men wearing masks were at the scene when police arrived. One ran to a red 2005 Chevrolet Corvette, which police said was stolen from the business and parked nearby, and drove at an officer who was outside of his patrol car, according to police.
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NEWS
February 25, 2014
Aberdeen William Lee Daniels, 23, of the first block of Ray Avenue, was arrested Thursday on a bench warrant in a case he was charged with driving while his license was suspended. Joshua Paul Antlitz, 29, of the 600 block of Law Street and the 500 block of Cider Press Loop in Joppa, was arrested Friday on a bench warrant in a case in which he was charged with driving while his license was suspended, driving with a suspended registration, failure to display his license and speeding.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
Aberdeen William Lee Daniels, 23, of the first block of Ray Avenue, was arrested Thursday on a bench warrant in a case he was charged with driving while his license was suspended. Joshua Paul Antlitz, 29, of the 600 block of Law Street and the 500 block of Cider Press Loop in Joppa, was arrested Friday on a bench warrant in a case in which he was charged with driving while his license was suspended, driving with a suspended registration, failure to display his license and speeding.
NEWS
December 28, 1994
Police checking a burglar alarm at St. Claire Elementary School Saturday morning arrested a Glen Burnie youth.The boy, 16, was charged as a juvenile with fourth-degree burglary, trespassing and destruction of property after admitting breaking into the school, police said, and was released to the custody of his parents.Officers found him standing in front of the school when they drove up about 1:15 a.m., police said. He told the officers he had smashed several windows to get into the school, in the 900 block of Blue Ridge Road, police said.
NEWS
October 12, 1993
POLICE LOG* Windy Knolls: Burglars stole $26,000 worth of jewelry from a house in the first block of Larbo Road sometime between Thursday morning and 9:45 a.m. Friday.* Old Mill: Someone threw a rock through the window of the Soda Pop shop in the 600 block of Old Mill Road at 4:50 a.m. Sunday and stole several cartons of cigarettes. County police said they were called to the store when its burglar alarm went off, but they arrived too late.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1991
Police investigating the fatal shooting of a 17-year-old Pimlico-area youth in the kitchen of his foster home say the victim apparently activated an interior burglar alarm while being chased by his killer.Northwestern District police, who responded to the alarm about 10:11 a.m. yesterday, checked the house for signs of forced entry and left when none were found. The victim's body was found about 3:18 p.m. when a resident of the house returned home.Other residents of the house last saw the victim about 8 a.m."
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1994
Call it a bad sequel -- The Burglar Alarm From Hell Part II.That's what some Timber Grove residents thought when a vacationing neighbor's burglar alarm went off three days ago and kept going.Luckily for them, Garrison District police officers and a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. electronic technician took care of the problem yesterday afternoon before things got nasty -- unlike a similar Randallstown incident in May when neighbors suffered through six days of almost nonstop whoop-whoop-whooping and continuing media coverage.
NEWS
June 3, 1994
The recent episode of the Randallstown burglar alarm that wouldn't shut up isn't your typical false alarm story. Indeed, many people (none of them Randallstowners) found it a mildly amusing tale.To police departments nationwide, though, false alarms are no laughing matter. As the fear of crime scares more homeowners into buying burglar alarm systems -- 8 percent of U.S. homes were wired in 1992, a figure expected to approach 20 percent by 2000 -- the number of false alarm calls has consequently increased.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1994
Baltimore County police today will seek a court order to get permission to enter a house on Forest Garden Avenue in Lochearn to turn off a burglar alarm that has been blaring off-and-on since yesterday evening.Police said the owner of the house is out of town and that efforts to contact him have not been successful.However, a neighbor who reportedly has a key to the house had not been located last night.The incident is similar to one in Woodlawn several weeks ago when an outside burglar alarm kept neighbors awake for several days while the owner of the house was vacationing in Asia.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young is calling for increased scrutiny of the city's False Alarm Reduction Program, which he says is partly responsible for the city government's seizure of thousands of homes. "People [can rack up] thousands of dollars in false alarms," said Lester Davis, Young's spokesman. "The city can seize your home over unpaid bills. You want the city to have some teeth, but you also want to be smart. If someone is not paying, does it make sense to take someone's home and now the city is responsible for another vacant property?"
EXPLORE
September 24, 2011
FINKSBURG - The Carroll County Sheriff's Office reported Sept. 21 that twin brothers from Howard County had been arrested and charged with a pair of burglaries last month in the county. Timothy Brian Feick and Matthew Dean Feick, 26, of Clarksville, were charged in the August burglaries of pharmacies in Finksburg and Woodbine. On Aug. 4, sheriff's deputies responded a burglar alarm at the King's Pharmacy in the Woodbine Shopping Center just after 2 a.m. Investigators found the pharmacy's front window shattered and more than $13,000 in medications missing.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
Lucy L. Glenn has protected her East Baltimore townhouse with a burglar alarm for nearly 20 years. But new city-imposed fees for such systems have her feeling robbed nonetheless. "I have to buy my medicine, I pay my taxes and I pay my mortgage," said Glenn, 72, of North Aisquith Avenue. "I pay $37 a month for the [burglar alarm] monitoring and now I have to pay a $20 registration fee?" The law, which took effect late last year and drew protests from alarm customers, says she has to pay. But City Councilwoman Lisa Joi Stancil introduced a bill last night that proposes to pass along that fee to burglar alarm companies that monitor security systems.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2003
Responding to angry e-mails, letters and phone calls, the City Council is rethinking a program that charges residents a $20 annual burglar alarm fee. Councilwoman Helen L. Holton introduced a bill last night that would make the fee a one-time charge instead of annual. Under the plan, businesses would continue to pay the yearly fee -- and anyone would face fines for repeated false alarms. The bill was referred to the taxation committee for study. "The outcry has been so strong from the citizens of Baltimore," Holton said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 18, 2001
Baltimore County police are crediting the county's alarm-reduction ordinance for a sharp drop in the number of false alarms last year. The department released statistics this week showing that the number of calls for alarms dropped 21 percent last year compared with the year before. Authorities estimate that 98 percent of alarm calls are false. The County Council established fines in 1998 for businesses that experience more than three false alarms in a year. The fines range from $50 to $1,000.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 23, 2000
I PICKED UP a flashlight, summoned my courage and told my wife: "If the police nab me, come down to the station house and bail me out." She said she might. With that tepid assurance, I set out on a mission, namely to get in and out of a house without setting off the burglar alarm. I know people do this every day. But most of them are entering and exiting their own houses, punching their own alarms. I was going to try to do this at a neighbor's house. I had inherited this job. It had been passed along to me during morning carpool duty.
EXPLORE
September 24, 2011
FINKSBURG - The Carroll County Sheriff's Office reported Sept. 21 that twin brothers from Howard County had been arrested and charged with a pair of burglaries last month in the county. Timothy Brian Feick and Matthew Dean Feick, 26, of Clarksville, were charged in the August burglaries of pharmacies in Finksburg and Woodbine. On Aug. 4, sheriff's deputies responded a burglar alarm at the King's Pharmacy in the Woodbine Shopping Center just after 2 a.m. Investigators found the pharmacy's front window shattered and more than $13,000 in medications missing.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
Lucy L. Glenn has protected her East Baltimore townhouse with a burglar alarm for nearly 20 years. But new city-imposed fees for such systems have her feeling robbed nonetheless. "I have to buy my medicine, I pay my taxes and I pay my mortgage," said Glenn, 72, of North Aisquith Avenue. "I pay $37 a month for the [burglar alarm] monitoring and now I have to pay a $20 registration fee?" The law, which took effect late last year and drew protests from alarm customers, says she has to pay. But City Councilwoman Lisa Joi Stancil introduced a bill last night that proposes to pass along that fee to burglar alarm companies that monitor security systems.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2000
A task force is searching for ways to fine-tune Baltimore County's false-alarm ordinance, a law that police say is working, but that some business owners say unfairly penalizes them. The task force, composed of 11 business owners and county councilmen Joseph Bartenfelder, Vincent J. Gardina and John A. Olszewski Sr., will offer proposals that would allow businesses to avoid fines by alerting police to false alarms. "I don't think they are looking to do away with the system. ... We are looking for consistency," said Olszewski.
NEWS
May 13, 1997
HOWARD COUNTY wasted $1 million of taxpayer money responding to false burglar alarms last year. Other local jurisdictions wasted millions more. Pets, windstorms and homeowners and hired help who don't know how security systems work are tripping alarms at alarming rates.In 1996, Howard County police responded to 19,883 bogus calls, about 55 a day. The problem is not local. Police departments across the country are faced with significant losses of money and manpower caused by home and business alarm systems.
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