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NEWS
November 26, 2012
For years we've been told that speed cameras have always been about safety and not revenue enhancement. Again we have been lied to by our politicians, and the proof is that inaccurate cameras are allowed to continue issuing $40 tickets ("Not so fast," Nov. 20). Isn't it about time that responsible parties actually are held responsible? The bureaucrat who allowed this to continue should be fired and forced to pay for the wrongly issued tickets. Leonard Magsamen, Nottingham
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 23, 2014
For understandable reasons, the IRS scandal has largely focused on the political question of whether the White House deliberately targeted opponents. To date there's no evidence that it did. That's good for the president, but it may not be good for the country, because if the administration didn't target opponents, that would mean the IRS has become corrupt all on its own. In 1939, Bruno Rizzi, a largely forgotten communist intellectual, wrote a hugely controversial book, "The Bureaucratization of the World.
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NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | November 22, 1993
If we are going to reinvent the federal government, as President Clinton vows, the first thing that should be done is to appoint a chief nickel-biter.This cheapo-czar, as he might also be called, would be in charge of a Department of Nickel-Biting, which would be made up of people who have never been bureaucrats, who loathe bureaucrats and have experience making a living in the real world.Ideally, they would be individuals who have built and run small businesses despite the snooping, stumbling and bumbling of intrusive bureaucrats.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
Actually, I am talking about the space in health care .  The Associated Press Stylebook  still holds fast to health care  as two words. And because it is a noun-noun combination, you would not want to hyphenate it as a compound modifier: health care initiative  rather than health-care initiative .  But look around. You will see increasingly that medical professionals and bureaucrats are fusing the term into healthcare . The Baltimore Alliance for Careers in Healthcare . The Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program . The American Society for Healthcare Risk Managemen t. There are still plenty of outfits keeping health care  as two words, but I think we can see where this is going.  This is not President Obama trying to steal the space between the words to rob you of your freedoms. Fusing compounds is an old trick of English, deep in its Germanic DNA. My guess is that the bureaucrats will ultimately prevail, partly because journalists reflexively echo them and pass the jargon into common discourse.  But English is still a big tent.
NEWS
By LUCIA MAGARIAN | February 5, 1995
OK. Here's my plan. We unplug America. We demagnetize the metal strips on the back of plastic cards; we permanently lose the remote control; and we place roadblocks at all the entrance ramps to the information superhighway. In other words, we ought to go back to the days before computer chips when life was slower and people were nicer.I don't hate high-tech gadgetry. I just don't see how it has made life that much easier. "Techno-rot" one writer calls it -- his name for telephone answering systems that send you in circles, data banks that know more about you than your mother, and all the computerized stuff that's too complicated for the average person to figure out.Bureaucrats and jerks love anything that has a computer chip in it. They take new technology and figure out ways to use it to make your life miserable.
NEWS
By Frank Greve and Frank Greve,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- When federal bureaucrats are graded by their bosses, A's come easy. Only 1 in 500 flunks. More than 80 percent earn above-average grades.And bureaucrats seem to be getting better all the time. Fifteen years ago, barely 1 in 100 of the top 150,000 managers earned an outstanding job rating. Last year, 3 in 10 earned it, according to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management."It could be that the quality of work has improved," says OPM analyst Effie Siegel. "Clearly, that is a possibility."
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 23, 2014
For understandable reasons, the IRS scandal has largely focused on the political question of whether the White House deliberately targeted opponents. To date there's no evidence that it did. That's good for the president, but it may not be good for the country, because if the administration didn't target opponents, that would mean the IRS has become corrupt all on its own. In 1939, Bruno Rizzi, a largely forgotten communist intellectual, wrote a hugely controversial book, "The Bureaucratization of the World.
NEWS
March 30, 2011
How much are the "talking" buses going to cost taxpayers? This is surreal. Obviously, if this is how our bureaucrats are spending their time and energy, the government is entirely too big. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2001
TOKYO - In a move aimed at expanding efficiency and shifting the power balance from bureaucrats to politicians, Japan has trimmed the number of national ministries and agencies by nearly half, effective this week. Hallways throughout Tokyo's Kasumigaseki district, the base of the central government, were piled high over the weekend with more than 130,000 boxes, as bureaucrats scurried to find mislaid documents and moving vans outside disgorged more in the biggest revamping since World War II. The government has not provided an official cost for the operation, but some estimates place it in excess of $350 million.
NEWS
August 31, 1992
The London Economist, which first proclaimed Parkinson's Law (Work expands to fill the time available for its completion) in 1955, has made a horrifying discovery. The original dogma explained the growth of government: Bureaucrats create work to justify their own positions. The computer chip and other electronic wonders of the modern office should by now have "rescued us from the bureaucratic suffocation envisioned by Mr. Parkinson," the British journal reasons."Would it were so," the Economist concludes.
NEWS
June 22, 2013
The recent Sun editorial regarding Baltimore's budget sounded like it was written at City Hall - the story of the heartfelt push by city government to reform itself into a positive middle class-builder ("Building a middle class," June 19). It's really just more of the Maryland governmental spin cycle: Tax, spend, and repeat! In Baltimore, we listen to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's shell game of lowering the property tax rate, while riding high on the city's maximum income tax rate, increasing the city's budget, creating new taxes, and raising existing taxes and fees on everything but the air we breathe.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
For years we've been told that speed cameras have always been about safety and not revenue enhancement. Again we have been lied to by our politicians, and the proof is that inaccurate cameras are allowed to continue issuing $40 tickets ("Not so fast," Nov. 20). Isn't it about time that responsible parties actually are held responsible? The bureaucrat who allowed this to continue should be fired and forced to pay for the wrongly issued tickets. Leonard Magsamen, Nottingham
EXPLORE
February 9, 2012
One of the first solutions suggested when the subject of government being out of touch with the voters comes up is term limits. By limiting the number of years in office someone can serve, so goes the logic, it is assured new people who are closer to the issues are always entering elected office and making decisions. Presumably, such well-intentioned sentiments are behind a proposed change to Harford County's charter to limit county council members to two consecutive four-year terms, the same limit imposed on the office of county executive.
NEWS
December 25, 2011
What if Maryland's governor initiated a plan to incrementally reduce local planning authority and concentrate it in the hands of unaccountable technocrats in Annapolis? What if he dusted off a 37-year-old law and used it as a pretext to implement this plan? What if the science behind the effort was not genuine, objective science, but junk science? What if the process of developing the plan has not been one of true consensus building and collaboration, as Maryland Planning Secretary Richard Hall has repeatedly suggested?
NEWS
July 4, 2011
I must say that I'm impressed with The Sun and the great wages it obviously must pay its employees. We have Michael Dresser who, for the last two weeks, has written several articles telling us how it's just dandy and about time that Maryland raised the tolls for all us poor folk. Never mind that most of these bridges and tunnels have been paid for several times over. What Mr. Dresser or some adventurous journalist should be doing is to finding out just how much money these tolls amount to, and then how much of that ends up paying for administrative bureaucracy.
NEWS
March 30, 2011
How much are the "talking" buses going to cost taxpayers? This is surreal. Obviously, if this is how our bureaucrats are spending their time and energy, the government is entirely too big. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
Actually, I am talking about the space in health care .  The Associated Press Stylebook  still holds fast to health care  as two words. And because it is a noun-noun combination, you would not want to hyphenate it as a compound modifier: health care initiative  rather than health-care initiative .  But look around. You will see increasingly that medical professionals and bureaucrats are fusing the term into healthcare . The Baltimore Alliance for Careers in Healthcare . The Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program . The American Society for Healthcare Risk Managemen t. There are still plenty of outfits keeping health care  as two words, but I think we can see where this is going.  This is not President Obama trying to steal the space between the words to rob you of your freedoms. Fusing compounds is an old trick of English, deep in its Germanic DNA. My guess is that the bureaucrats will ultimately prevail, partly because journalists reflexively echo them and pass the jargon into common discourse.  But English is still a big tent.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | May 9, 1993
Havre de Grace. -- For years now, Harford County has been an anomaly among Maryland's large and medium-sized jurisdictions because its police force has been headed by an elected politician instead of a bureaucrat.Bureaucrats and local policy wonks find this displeasing. The practice of letting the voters select the top police officer, who in Harford County is the sheriff, seems dangerous to those who put their faith in resumes, advanced degrees and other "professional" qualifications. It doesn't defer sufficiently to expert opinion.
NEWS
By James F. Burdick | December 31, 2010
The first salvo from the forces aligned to bring down the Obama health care plan has been fired. Your health may land in the lap of the Supreme Court as it adjudicates the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Leaving aside the legal language and overheated rhetoric, where will that leave us? As a doctor, I am thinking of the central focus: the frightened patient, perhaps in pain from a new illness, conferring with the doctor. Would the Founding Fathers have meant for the Constitution to allow access to care for any American who needs it?
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 10, 2010
Soon after he read my Sunday column, in which I listed the things that deserve the tea party's anger — increased poverty, the loss of manufacturing jobs, stagnant wages, the decline of labor unions, the concentration of wealth, the destruction of the middle class — George Newman dropped me a line. It was one of many letters I received in response to the column, only Mr. Newman's came with a dare: "I dare you to print this email wholly and entirely without an edit. My guess is you won't.
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