Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBureaucracy
IN THE NEWS

Bureaucracy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 20, 2011
It seems the Baltimore County Public School system is bent on prohibiting as many non-school day activities in its facilities as it can ("No fair — Parents protest ban on craft shows," Jan. 18). My children's elementary school was recently denied permission by BCPS's facilities department to hold an electronics recycling collection on a Saturday in the parking lot. The reason given was that there were liability issues (with household electronics?!) and the "uncertainty of 3rd party vendors" (i.e.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
You don't have to tell Brian Boston that the Highland Inn , his project near Clarksville in southwest Howard County, has been a long time coming. "It's been a little frustrating," said Boston, the executive chef and operating partner of the acclaimed Milton Inn in Baltimore County. But Highland Inn's opening really is getting closer. It will be open before the end of the year, in late November or early December, Boston said. "Most of the inside is finished," Boston said. "The kitchen has been in for quite some time.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 30, 1995
Critics of Carroll County's school system won't find much comfort in The Sun's recent survey of high-paid administrators in other Baltimore-area systems. Contrary to popular belief, Carroll's education bureaucracy is not overstaffed with overpaid bureaucrats.Compared to other jurisdictions, Carroll falls in just about the middle in terms of the number of school administrators earning upper-level pay, which the paper determined to be an annual salary of $60,000 or more. Only Harford County and Baltimore City had a smaller percentage of high-paid administrators.
NEWS
September 23, 2013
On the face of it, you can hardly blame City Council members for voting unanimously last week to block Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's proposal to transfer $100,000 from the Department of Recreation and Parks to the State's Attorney's Office. The optics of taking money away from programs that help city young people stay out of trouble and giving it instead to an agency that puts them in jail were beyond awful. On top of that, many council members and their constituents were rightly taken aback by the idea the city would raid parks and recreation's piggy bank whenever it needs extra cash for other projects.
NEWS
February 11, 1993
Economies of scale can be deceiving, especially when you're talking about government bureaucracy. That's the case with House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell's plan to merge the Departments of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Environment to cut state spending.Too many diverse programs, with conflicting priorities, make for a management nightmare. Environmental regulators sharing offices with managers of state lands and waters and with promoters of intensive land productivity -- it's hard to imagine a worse mix of competing interests.
NEWS
March 23, 1995
In the past three months, the information flow from the bureaucracy of Carroll government -- never a torrent -- has diminished to a trickle. Inquiries about the most innocuous of state grants, tourism statistics and environmental and planning matters are routed to department and bureau directors or not returned at all.Strangely, the behavior of the bureaucrats contrasts with the county's commissioners, who are accessible and, so far, have made a genuine effort...
NEWS
January 12, 1994
It is a welcome sign that the Carroll commissioners are rethinking their proposal to house the headquarters of the county's education department in portable office buildings. However, the proposal to use the old Telemecanique Inc. manufacturing plant on Bethel Road also has its drawbacks.Large, vacant industrial buildings are a scare commodity in Carroll. Commissioner Julia W. Gouge has reservations about taking the former factory off the tax rolls and converting it into a county building.
NEWS
By JOYCE GABRIEL | August 19, 1993
The good guys in any organization make things happen in spite of the bureaucracy. I learned this in high school when a couple of teachers with talent and vision guided a group of rough, tough kids through musical and theatrical feats which amaze me even in retrospect.I don't think the school administration was quite prepared for these guys. They deserve to be named because they wrought miracles in tough circumstances. The leader of the pack was a giant of a man -- physically and musically -- named Peter Runfolo.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | October 7, 1991
JERICHO, Israeli-Occupied West Bank -- Khaled Ammar needed to renew his driver's license, which is no simple matter.An Israeli can get a new license by mail. Mr. Ammar, a Palestinian, needed to visit scattered offices of the Israeli military government that rules the West Bank and Gaza Strip and has imposed an intentionally daunting bureaucracy on the Arab population.Before getting in line for the license, Mr. Ammar needed the police to certify that he was not wanted for a crime. He needed one tax office to agree that he owed no property taxes and another to declare that all was in order with his income taxes.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | July 30, 2002
NEW YORK - Several years ago, an Indian journalist friend of mine, who was working in Indonesia, remarked to me that corruption in the Indonesian bureaucracy was so endemic that when he paid a bribe to renew his residency permit, the Indonesian official he paid off gave him a receipt for his bribe so my friend could be reimbursed by his newspaper. For anyone who has worked abroad, such stories are not unusual. But they are also a useful prism for examining the epidemic of corporate cheating now wracking America.
NEWS
By Gene M. Ransom III | August 29, 2011
As we all know, it's not necessarily what you do that matters but how you do it. In response to the Maryland General Assembly's mandate to slash an additional $40 million from this year's fiscal budget, the state's Medicaid Advisory Committee (MAC) and the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) are being forced to consider a series of radical cost-cutting measures for the state's Medicaid program. Make no mistake: Spending must be curbed. It's how costs are contained that matters.
NEWS
March 14, 2011
Reading the article in The Sun ("Balto. Co. high schools plan cuts," March 14) was not the way I wanted to start my day. My husband and I have five children. Next year, four of them will be at Towson High School, and I am greatly disturbed to see that we will lose the services of 9.5 teachers. According to the article, Baltimore County intends to cut almost 200 teaching positions in its high schools. Class sizes are already too big and with these cuts the average sizes will grow even more, up to an average of 29 students per classroom.
NEWS
January 20, 2011
It seems the Baltimore County Public School system is bent on prohibiting as many non-school day activities in its facilities as it can ("No fair — Parents protest ban on craft shows," Jan. 18). My children's elementary school was recently denied permission by BCPS's facilities department to hold an electronics recycling collection on a Saturday in the parking lot. The reason given was that there were liability issues (with household electronics?!) and the "uncertainty of 3rd party vendors" (i.e.
NEWS
September 23, 2010
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is offering primary care doctors a 12 percent increase in reimbursement for preventive care ("CareFirst's promising idea for primary care," Sept. 23). Primary care doctors are expected to draw up care plans, have in depth encounters with their patients and follow their patients more frequently to be eligible, and if they show good outcomes with less hospitalizations and surgeries for the same patients, they will be rewarded up to 80 percent of the savings in cost that CareFirst anticipates it will reap from this program.
NEWS
By Jay P. Greene, Brian Kisida, and Jonathan Mills | August 17, 2010
As students return to college this fall, parents and taxpayers are probably wondering ‎where all of the money we give to universities actually goes. They may be ‎disappointed to discover that administration is consuming a large and rapidly growing ‎portion of university resources. Funds devoted to instruction, research and ‎service — the primary functions of a university — are growing much more slowly.‎ In a recently released report for the Goldwater Institute, we examined data collected by ‎the federal government from the country's leading 198 public and private universities.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | July 22, 2010
The phrase "too big to fail" has become a watchword since the Great Recession struck and our government leaped into action with its notorious TARP bailout, now totaling $3.7 trillion. Goldman Sachs is in that category; so are insurance giant AIG and General (now Government) Motors. Lehmann Bros. was allowed to fail, being the unwanted stepchild of Wall Street. But that's another story. The one I want to mention again here is about something "too big not to fail." And that is, sorry to say, our very own federal government.
NEWS
By David Evans | November 11, 1992
PRESIDENT-ELECT Bill Clinton has said he wants to put the military on a diet and trim the size of the operating forces. Why is it that trigger-pullers are the first to be fired and paper-pushers are last?Mr. Clinton might consider starting instead in Washington, where an enormous, redundant and superfluous military bureaucracy remains stoutly entrenched.This bureaucracy is so big that the biggest office building in the world, the Pentagon, houses less than a fifth of it -- 20,000 people. However, according to the most recent statistics, there are 116,000 Defense Department civilian and uniformed military personnel in the so-called Greater Washington Metropolitan Area.
NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,Contributing Writer | November 6, 1994
Hundreds of drinking vessels carefully collaged with documents and newspaper clippings sit on a shelf that spirals inward and upward 9 feet into the air.It beckons you to its center.Within moments, you are encircled by chronicles of an artist's battle with bureaucracy -- which ultimately resulted in the closing of a troubled Harford County landfill.Jan Pierce Stinchcomb fought City Hall and won. Now she has immortalized her struggle in "Solid Waste/Work in Progress," on view through Friday in Harford Community College's Chesapeake Gallery.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2010
When Vivian Holley got tossed from his boat into the choppy, cold Patapsco River off Fort McHenry Saturday afternoon, he very well could have lost his life, never mind the gold ring he was wearing. That both were saved after Holley spent 90 perilous minutes in the water is testament to the quick-thinking rescuers who not only tossed him a life-line but also grabbed the ring as it started to fall off his finger and disappear into the water. In the chaos of the rescue effort, Cathy Isphording, one of the passengers on the sailboat who helped save the 84-year-old Holley and a friend, stuffed the ring into her pocket.
NEWS
May 3, 2010
The Baltimore Sun and its editorial board are as guilty of scare-mongering as it says the opponents of the proposed Baltimore City Bottle Tax are in its editorial of April 29 ("Bottle tax scare"). Your words are as much of a disservice to the community as the anti-tax ads. I have no dog in this fight. I live in Baltimore County and work in Baltimore County. Yet, when the local paper takes the standard liberal view, it offends me to no end. When talking about the budget cuts that may be required if this tax is not passed, the editorial board resorts to the standard untouchable third rails of local politics: police, fire, roads and the children.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.