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By Perry L. Weed | March 24, 2014
The Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) employment projections from 2012 through 2022 confirm what Americans already know: The nation is in a structural unemployment crisis, and the outlook is bleak. The U.S. job market has changed radically. Jobs are much harder to get, and better paying jobs require higher education or more advanced technical training. In 2012, workers with a post-secondary education or higher earned a median income of $57,770 - more than twice the $27,670 earned by those with only a high school diploma.
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NEWS
By Perry L. Weed | March 24, 2014
The Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) employment projections from 2012 through 2022 confirm what Americans already know: The nation is in a structural unemployment crisis, and the outlook is bleak. The U.S. job market has changed radically. Jobs are much harder to get, and better paying jobs require higher education or more advanced technical training. In 2012, workers with a post-secondary education or higher earned a median income of $57,770 - more than twice the $27,670 earned by those with only a high school diploma.
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NEWS
April 17, 1998
Audrey Freedman, 68, a supervising economist at the Bureau of Labor Statistics from 1958 to 1973 who championed the cause of women in the workplace, died Sunday in New York. She had leukemia.A member and former leader of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' business research advisory council, Mrs. Freedman argued against the belief that female workers are more expensive than men, because of child rearing. She said far more costly drains on corporate productivity, such as alcohol and drug abuse and corporate fraud, were likely to be committed by men.Pub Date: 4/17/98
NEWS
January 21, 1992
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that American women still lag behind their counterparts in several other Western democracies in closing the salary gap with men.The Evening Sun wants to know if you believe a gender pay gap exists where you work. Call SUNDIAL, the Baltimore Sun's telephone information system, on a Touch-Tone phone. The call is local, and answers will be registered between 10 a.m. and midnight. The SUNDIAL phone number is 783-1800 or, in Anne Arundel County, 268-7736.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2005
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Event of the week The Bureau of Labor Statistics releases the unemployment rate and payroll numbers for March on Friday. Unemployment was 5.4 percent in February, and the consensus estimate on Briefing.com is for it to drop to 5.3 percent. Monday Earnings reports: Brookstone, Walgreen Tuesday Consumer confidence for March Earnings reports: Apollo Group, Micron Technology Wednesday Final fourth-quarter gross domestic product numbers Earnings reports: Best Buy, Carmax Group, Circuit City, Ruby Tuesday Thursday Personal income and spending for February; factory orders for February; Chicago purchasing managers index for March Earnings reports: A.G. Edwards, Cognos, Red Hat Friday Auto and truck sales for March; construction spending for February; revised University of Michigan consumer sentiment report for March
BUSINESS
By A Sun Staff Writer | February 11, 1995
Pay raises for Baltimore area residents didn't keep pace with inflation in 1993, the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics reported yesterday.Baltimore area residents earned an average of $27,236 in 1993, a percent increase from the previous year. The Consumer Price Index in 1993 rose by 2.1 percent.BLS economist Alan Paisner said 1993's statistics may be skewed by tax changes that encouraged people to take bonuses and other income in 1992. In previous years, area residents have seen raises match or exceed inflation, he said.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2010
A majority of union members now work for the government, partly because layoffs in the recession plunged the private sector's union levels to a record low. Local, state and government workers make up 51.5 percent of all union members - becoming the majority of organized labor for the first time, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday. The shift shows the difficulty unions face in trying to revive a movement that has declined since its peak in the 1950s. And it undermines the traditional ability of unions to push private sector wages higher.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
Median household income 2000 2008 Anne Arundel 61,000 83,000 Baltimore 29,000 40,000 Baltimore Co. 49,000 63,000 Carroll 62,000 78,000 Harford 59,000 77,000 Howard 77,000 102,000 2000 average 172 2008 average ...
NEWS
January 25, 2010
Since the cost of everything that I purchase, including rent, food, clothing, utilities, insurance, gasoline, etc. had risen significantly from the third quarter of 2008 to the third quarter of 2009, it is obvious that the Bureau of Labor Statistics made a serious error in claiming that the Consumer Price Index (CPI) had not risen, and as a result, there was no cost of living increase for Social Security recipients, government and railroad retirees, and many others. The price increases are so obvious that all of us receiving retirement checks are wondering why we are being ripped off. And because it is so obvious, a great many of us wonder if the current administration ordered the bogus CPI to help curb costs, at the expense of the retired sector who receive government retirement checks.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
Maryland workers made slower gains in average pay than others in the country last year for the first time since the boom years of the late 1980s. But their progress was enough to hang onto the state's relatively enviable pay-level ranking, 10th in the country.Pay levels for Marylanders covered by state and federal unemployment insurance rose to an average of $27,145 from 1991 to 1992, an increase of 4.6 percent. By comparison, average pay for all covered Americans rose 5.4 percent to $25,903.
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