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NEWS
April 17, 1998
Audrey Freedman, 68, a supervising economist at the Bureau of Labor Statistics from 1958 to 1973 who championed the cause of women in the workplace, died Sunday in New York. She had leukemia.A member and former leader of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' business research advisory council, Mrs. Freedman argued against the belief that female workers are more expensive than men, because of child rearing. She said far more costly drains on corporate productivity, such as alcohol and drug abuse and corporate fraud, were likely to be committed by men.Pub Date: 4/17/98
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NEWS
By Perry L. Weed | March 24, 2014
The Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) employment projections from 2012 through 2022 confirm what Americans already know: The nation is in a structural unemployment crisis, and the outlook is bleak. The U.S. job market has changed radically. Jobs are much harder to get, and better paying jobs require higher education or more advanced technical training. In 2012, workers with a post-secondary education or higher earned a median income of $57,770 - more than twice the $27,670 earned by those with only a high school diploma.
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BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
Maryland workers made slower gains in average pay than others in the country last year for the first time since the boom years of the late 1980s. But their progress was enough to hang onto the state's relatively enviable pay-level ranking, 10th in the country.Pay levels for Marylanders covered by state and federal unemployment insurance rose to an average of $27,145 from 1991 to 1992, an increase of 4.6 percent. By comparison, average pay for all covered Americans rose 5.4 percent to $25,903.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 21, 2007
The end of denial always requires a jarring encounter with reality. Mine came at the Giant, where a $4 gallon of milk made clear - in a way that somehow $3 gas hadn't - that forces pushing up consumer prices are aligned as they haven't been since the 1980s. A worldwide boom has driven up the costs of basics such as energy, food and metals as well as shipping capacity and smart workers. The computer-productivity and global-outsourcing trends that enabled a decade of low inflation seem to be running out of steam.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 1998
LAS VEGAS -- With the AFL-CIO focusing on recruiting more workers, the labor leaders gathered here for the federation's winter meeting were stunned and stumped by the latest news on union membership.According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, union membership fell by 159,000 last year, to 16.1 million, even though unions have pumped millions of dollars more into organizing and said they recruited 385,000 more workers in 1997. This decline was especially worrisome, union officials acknowledged, because the economy added 2.8 million jobs.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1996
While prices rose 0.3 percent across the country last month, they have fallen recently in metro Baltimore, according to the Department of Labor. The Consumer Price Index for the region fell 0.2 percent in August and September.At least one analyst thinks a falling Baltimore CPI reflects a tepid regional business climate."My reading of it is, the economy is quite soft," said Charles McMillion, chief economist for MBG Information Services in Washington.Government officials, however, said short-term dips sometimes are caused by seasonal fluctuations.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
From the sniper attacks that killed a Maryland bus driver to the collapse of a Rockville parking lot that crushed three construction workers, the number of on-the-job fatalities across the state grew by more than 50 percent in 2002, according to statistics released yesterday. Though the deaths - many of them homicides and highway crashes - represent a sliver of Maryland's work force of about 2.4 million, the rise marks the state's largest annual increase in a decade. The spike in Maryland's numbers comes at a time when the workplace fatalities across the country are dropping.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | December 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- After 13 1/2 years as head of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Janet L. Norwood retires from the government today with a fax machine presented by 325 admiring colleagues, a near-legendary reputation for non-partisanship, and plaudits that include one senator's designation of her as a "national treasure."If an informed public is essential for democracy, Norwood says, solid data are essential for an informed public."You can't have a democratic society without having a good data base," she said.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 4, 1995
The next decade looks good for travel agents, private detectives and subway operators. But don't even think about becoming a butcher, watchmaker or shipfitter.So says the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, which periodically borrows a standard commercial computer model of the economy, massages the numbers a bit and then grinds out predictions of where the jobs will be.As a soothsayer, the bureau is distinctly fallible: Too much, after all, turns on such imponderables as the rate of military spending and the Federal Reserve's ability to keep the economy out of recession.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | October 30, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Janet L. Norwood, veteran U.S. commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, decries Washington's lack of leadership on economic problems, saying the country is being polarized by the growth of the most severe gap between the poorest and richest Americans she has seen in 38 years of government service."
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
From the sniper attacks that killed a Maryland bus driver to the collapse of a Rockville parking lot that crushed three construction workers, the number of on-the-job fatalities across the state grew by more than 50 percent in 2002, according to statistics released yesterday. Though the deaths - many of them homicides and highway crashes - represent a sliver of Maryland's work force of about 2.4 million, the rise marks the state's largest annual increase in a decade. The spike in Maryland's numbers comes at a time when the workplace fatalities across the country are dropping.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Lorraine Mirabella and Stacey Hirsh and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
For John Godleski, winter has meant no more cable television or weekly family outings to McDonald's or Pizza Hut. Christmas meant no gift for his wife and a price limit on toys for his children. And going to the Domino Sugar plant - where he has worked for more than a dozen years - meant that instead of loading sugar onto trucks, Godleski would brave the bitter cold as he and his co-workers march on strike outside the plant's front gate. "What keeps me going is my kids. I've got four kids to take care of," said Godleski.
NEWS
April 17, 1998
Audrey Freedman, 68, a supervising economist at the Bureau of Labor Statistics from 1958 to 1973 who championed the cause of women in the workplace, died Sunday in New York. She had leukemia.A member and former leader of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' business research advisory council, Mrs. Freedman argued against the belief that female workers are more expensive than men, because of child rearing. She said far more costly drains on corporate productivity, such as alcohol and drug abuse and corporate fraud, were likely to be committed by men.Pub Date: 4/17/98
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 1998
LAS VEGAS -- With the AFL-CIO focusing on recruiting more workers, the labor leaders gathered here for the federation's winter meeting were stunned and stumped by the latest news on union membership.According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, union membership fell by 159,000 last year, to 16.1 million, even though unions have pumped millions of dollars more into organizing and said they recruited 385,000 more workers in 1997. This decline was especially worrisome, union officials acknowledged, because the economy added 2.8 million jobs.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1996
While prices rose 0.3 percent across the country last month, they have fallen recently in metro Baltimore, according to the Department of Labor. The Consumer Price Index for the region fell 0.2 percent in August and September.At least one analyst thinks a falling Baltimore CPI reflects a tepid regional business climate."My reading of it is, the economy is quite soft," said Charles McMillion, chief economist for MBG Information Services in Washington.Government officials, however, said short-term dips sometimes are caused by seasonal fluctuations.
NEWS
By H. Erich Heinemann | February 28, 1996
NEW YORK -- Pundits are saying the presidential debate this year will be about falling wages and record profits. Politicians aver both are ''bad.'' Voters, however, should ask whether wages are really falling. Record profits, if they exist, should be celebrated, not attacked.Even Sen. Robert Dole, the Republican front-runner, has climbed on the populist bandwagon. Shame on him. The claim of falling wages is false. He should know better.Stop a minute and think. If real, inflation-adjusted wages had actually fallen for the last 20 years -- as politicians claim and news people mindlessly repeat -- why did retail stores hire 8.5 million more workers from 1975 to 1995?
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
What were you doing most of last week? Were you working, looking for work, or keeping house?The question may sound innocuous enough, but because of its final three words, the U.S. unemployment rate was substantially underreported for nearly three decades until this January.That is because pollsters for the Bureau of Labor Statistics asked the question, in that form, only of women. For men, the question left off "or keeping house.""A lot of women chose to say that they had been keeping house, even though they might have worked part time or spent a few hours looking for work," bureau economist Peter Cattan said.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 11, 1995
Bureau of Labor Statistics, tell me it isn't so.Say that come 1998, Baltimore and Washington won't be smashed into one 7,000-square mile region called Washimore.I wake up screaming in a nightmare of confusion. Does a single Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area stretching from the Susquehanna River to Culpepper County mean the end of regional differences and pleasant idiosyncrasies.Will State Department officials, educated at Yale University, start adding the terms "Hon" and "zink" to their active vocabulary?
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | December 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The budget battle has a good side. It has brought attention to some new data that should shake the credibility of the central economic argument of our time, espoused by politicians as diverse as Bill Clinton and Pat Buchanan. Not a moment too soon.The idea that in recent years Americans have made little economic progress or have actually lost ground -- that the rich got richer while the poor got poorer -- is wrong and harmful.Take, for example, the Bureau of Labor Statistics data showing that price-adjusted median weekly earnings of all full-time workers from 1979 to 1994 has decreased by 6 percent.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 4, 1995
The next decade looks good for travel agents, private detectives and subway operators. But don't even think about becoming a butcher, watchmaker or shipfitter.So says the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, which periodically borrows a standard commercial computer model of the economy, massages the numbers a bit and then grinds out predictions of where the jobs will be.As a soothsayer, the bureau is distinctly fallible: Too much, after all, turns on such imponderables as the rate of military spending and the Federal Reserve's ability to keep the economy out of recession.
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