Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBunt
IN THE NEWS

Bunt

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | May 1, 2012
Gilman first baseman Ryan Ripken, tall and lanky, pounds his fist in his glove as he watches his pitcher Matt Collins get in position for his next throw. "We're all going off movement and putting pressure on the batter," said Ripken, a senior who will be attending South Carolina in the fall. As the pitcher pulls his arm back, Ripken rushes toward home plate. It's a move other teams make. Gilman coach Larry Sheets calls it "typical bunt defense". But seldom do you see a first basemen get as close to the batter as Ripken did Monday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
OAKLAND, Calif. - A day after blowing his third save opportunity of the season in a 5-4, walk-off loss Friday to the Oakland Athletics, Orioles closer Zach Britton wanted to get back on the mound as soon as possible. “I hope we either have a huge lead or I have to opportunity to be out there,” Britton said. “I think the one thing about being a reliever is that you're able to turn the page much quicker. You understand it's one bad inning, and you just kind of move on. You make adjustments, and if the same situation comes in, you know how to attack it differently than I did last night.” Britton failed to retire a batter in the ninth inning, and Oakland won on Josh Donaldson's three-run homer to center field.
Advertisement
SPORTS
May 12, 2010
It was a good idea Phil Rogers Chicago Tribune Good baseball is always about doing what's called for in the situation. Evan Longoria's bunt attempt in the middle of Dallas Braden's perfect game on Sunday was a good idea at the time, and well within anyone's understanding of baseball etiquette. Longoria was leading off the fifth inning, with Tampa Bay trailing 4-0. While he's a power hitter, the four-run deficit meant the Rays needed a big inning. He was only thinking about getting on base to spark that when he tried to bunt Braden's first pitch for a hit. He fouled it off and would go on to strike out. Afterward, Braden called the try "intelligent," and he was right.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
The Museum of Industry announced Monday it had received a surprise donation from Unilever of roughly two dozen boxes of photographs, documents, and advertising materials related to Noxzema, the widely-used skin cream first sold in the early 1900s from a North Avenue pharmacy in Baltimore. Baltimore pharmacist George Bunting, who named his company the Noxell Corp., later expanded into other areas, including CoverGirl cosmetics. Noxell had about 1,400 Hunt Valley employees in 1989, when Procter & Gamble bought the business for $1.3 billion.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1995
It was a good news/bad news situation for Curtis Goodwin in the fifth inning last night.The good news was that he showed he hasn't forgotten one of his best offensive weapons -- the bunt. The bad news was that he didn't get the ball on the ground and it was caught by Boston first baseman Mo Vaughn.When he first joined the Orioles and was on a mercurial .500 (batting average) ride that everyone knew couldn't continue, Goodwin was successful in his first two attempts to bunt for a hit.His early success had a dramatic effect -- those ground-ball singles Goodwin has been able to squeeze through the right side are not complete accidents.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1994
Putting the ball down in order to get a batting average up is not a completely lost art. Just one that needs an occasional reminder.The Orioles, in a subtle way, have been doing just that lately with Brady Anderson. His power gives him an added dimension for a speed player, but the ability to bunt more often for a base hit would enhance his overall effectiveness as a leadoff hitter.Recently, it has been noted that Anderson has, in baseball lingo, "put the ball on the ground" more than he has in the past two years.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | July 31, 1994
When Jamie Moyer got dinked for two runs in the first inning of the Orioles' 4-3 loss to Toronto on Friday night, the most artistic hit came off a bat that wasn't even swung.It was a bunt single by an unexpected source, Paul Molitor, that drove in the first run of the game and set up the second. Coming from one of the game's top hitters, in an unlikely situation (runners on first and third with nobody out), it was yet another demonstration of Molitor's do-it-all offensive ability.The perfectly placed roller along the third base line was an indication of how effective a drag bunt can be. It was also a reminder that the art is lost on all but a few skilled players.
SPORTS
By Joe Gergen and Joe Gergen,Newsday | February 28, 1992
PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. -- On the first day, Bobby Bonilla bunted. Check that. He attempted to bunt.It was a rude (and hilarious) awakening for the highest-paid player in baseball, an honor he is expected to concede whenever Ryne Sandberg puts pen to contract.No sooner had Bonilla slipped into a New York Met uniform -- No. 25, for those scoring at home -- and joined his new teammates for a workout yesterday than he found himself in an uncomfortable position: crouched in a batting cage, with his hands spread far apart on the weapon that will earn him $29 million during the next five seasons.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
More often than not, a sacrifice bunt turns out to be just that -- the sacrifice of an out.However, there are rare instances, when the execution is perfect on the offensive end, that the play becomes the key factor not only in an inning, but also in a game. Such was the case for the Orioles in Monday night's 4-1 win over the Toronto Blue Jays.Even though Jack Voigt's seventh-inning bunt single didn't produce the big inning it could have, it did set up what proved to be the winning run. And it should be pointed out that although the "book" dictated a sacrifice attempt in that situation, it wasn't manager Johnny Oates' first strategical choice.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | April 10, 2000
It was a seemingly trivial exchange, a routine conversation between a manager and his leadoff man. But it was an exchange that showed how far Mike Hargrove has come, and how he already is making a difference with the Orioles. Hargrove drew criticism last season in Cleveland for failing to communicate with players. Brady Anderson drew criticism in Baltimore for failing to execute a sacrifice bunt in Texas under former manager Ray Miller. Well, there was Hargrove before yesterday's game, thanking Anderson for two pivotal sacrifice bunts that the player delivered in Saturday's 2-1 victory over Detroit in 10 innings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
John W. Bunting III, a former program specialist for the state Department of Social Services who was an HIV/AIDS activist, died Nov. 5 of heart failure at his Sutton Place Apartments home. He was 69. The son of a salesman and a school teacher, John William Bunting III was born in Huntington, W.Va., and was a 1962 graduate of Barboursville High School in Barboursville, W.Va. He attended the University of Baltimore and served in the Navy from 1966 to 1968 aboard the carrier USS Independence.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel, For The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
The dominance of Severna Park's boys and South River's girls teams was the big story at Thursday's Anne Arundel County cross country championships at Annapolis. Ryan Forsyth won the race as the top-ranked Falcons grabbed seven of the top eight finishes for a third straight team title. Carly Bunting won the girls race as her No. 8 Seahawks took the first three spots and the second team title in school history. Severna Park's Forsyth won his race in a course-record time of 16 minutes, 6.12 seconds.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
Ever since racing returned to their hometown in 2011 with the then-Baltimore Grand Prix, longtime friends Marc Bunting and Kieffer Rittenhouse have tried to combine their love for the sport with their love for the city. Despite a more competitive field and the rather costly investment that comes with racing in the American Le Mans Series, Bunting and Rittenhouse will return for the Labor Day weekend event. An official announcement is expected Monday, but Bunting and Rittenhouse said Sunday that Team Baltimore will take part in the Grand Prix of Baltimore's ALMS GTC Class race on Aug. 31. "It's pretty much a continuation of what we've done the first two years," said Bunting, who used to race fulltime on the Grand-Am Rolex GT circuit.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Lloyd M. Bunting Jr., a four-time All-American lacrosse player who was one of the outstanding Johns Hopkins University players of the late 1940s, died July 6 of complications from a staph infection at the Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. He was 87. "If I were to pick one athlete whose credentials stood out in my 65 years at Hopkins, it would be Lloyd," said Robert H. "Bob" Scott, who was a midfielder on the 1950 lacrosse team with Mr. Bunting and later coached the sport at Hopkins for two decades.
SPORTS
By Everett Cook and The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
It was the second inning and Orioles were already in position to blow the game open. Mark Reynolds had started the inning off with a home run - his fourth in six games. Then Manny Machado doubled and Omar Quintanilla walked. There were no outs, and with Nick Markakis up, the Orioles had Red Sox starter Clay Buchholz on the ropes. On the first pitch of the at bat, Markakis tried to get a bunt down and bounced the ball right in front of the plate. Boston catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia had plenty of time to throw out Machado at third, which wouldn't have been the end of the world if Markakis was running out the bunt.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2012
This has been Orioles rookie Wei-Yin Chen's first foray into interleague play, where American League pitchers are forced to bat in National League parks, but the Taiwanese left-hander has already seen enough to know he's not a fan. “Not really, because I hate hitting,” Chen said through an interpreter. But Chen and the Orioles left Turner Field on Sunday afternoon able to boast that they beat the Braves at their own game - excelling in an NL style of baseball that leans on manufactured runs, solid pitching and technique-minded defense - for a 2-0 series-clinching win over Atlanta.
SPORTS
By PAT O'MALLEY and PAT O'MALLEY,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2006
Tiny came up big while home runs were the order yesterday at the opening of the seventh Cal Ripken 12-and-under World Series in Aberdeen. At least one homer was hit in four of six games, two of them game-winners, but it was a bunt by one of the smallest players in the tournament, 3-foot-7 Anson Arruda, that carried defending champion Hilo, Hawaii, to a 2-0 victory over Kennewick, Wash. Hilo and Kennewick opened the series in the first game ever played at the Ripken Academy's Fenway field, which has a mini- Green Monster in left field.
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | October 7, 2007
DEAR CAL -- I am 15 and play high school and Babe Ruth baseball. I have decent speed and am told many times to bunt. But I find it hard to bunt an inside pitch down the third base line. Should I take the pitch down the first base line or should I try to bring my hands closer to my body and still try to put it down the third base line? Joshua Plowman, Greenville, N.C. DEAR JOSHUA -- We like to teach players to bunt the ball where it is pitched, just as with hitting. Doing that increases your chances of being successful.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Right-hander Jake Arrieta's demotion to the bullpen didn't last long. Arrieta will start tonight against the Pirates here at Camden Yards, as Orioles manager Buck Showalter decided to push scheduled starter Brian Matusz back two days after he bunted a ball off his nose before Tuesday's game. Arrieta, who has lost eight of his last nine starts, will work on normal rest, which made the decision easy for the Orioles. Arrieta was told he would start about four hours before the game.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | May 1, 2012
Gilman first baseman Ryan Ripken, tall and lanky, pounds his fist in his glove as he watches his pitcher Matt Collins get in position for his next throw. "We're all going off movement and putting pressure on the batter," said Ripken, a senior who will be attending South Carolina in the fall. As the pitcher pulls his arm back, Ripken rushes toward home plate. It's a move other teams make. Gilman coach Larry Sheets calls it "typical bunt defense". But seldom do you see a first basemen get as close to the batter as Ripken did Monday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.