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NEWS
May 13, 2007
On May 7, 2007, MILDRED AGNES devoted mother of Victor Evans and Valerie Bunker-Mitchell. She is also survived by three grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Sunday after 10 A.M. The family will receive friends at Holy Family Catholic Church, 9531 Liberty Road on Monday at 9 A.M., at which time funeral service will begin.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Though seldom emerging from the steel-and-reinforced-concrete bunker under the Baltimore Sun building on North Calvert Street from which I direct news desk operations, I do occasionally appear in public. Two such occasions are near, with one on the horizon.  Tomorrow morning and a week from tomorrow I will be at the console of the once-mighty Casavant at Memorial Episcopal Church in Bolton Hill, accompanying the congregation during the 9:30 service.  More remotely, I have been invited to present a workshop at the Editors' Association of Canada's first international conference in Toronto, June 12-14, 2015.
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SPORTS
August 19, 2010
Maybe they should just hold meetings. Get everybody in one room, pass out the sheet of local rules and go over it point by point. Allow time for questions. Offer two briefing times if that makes it easier on players. Heck, offer three. If a player can't be bothered to attend, send his caddie. Hey, NASCAR does it. Two hours before each Sprint Cup race, every driver and crew chief is required to attend the drivers' meeting. Among the items reviewed are speed limits on pit road, top speed under caution periods and where pit road technically begins and ends.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 5, 2013
I think Edith Bunker did more to liberate the caged American housewife than Betty Friedan ever did. The author of "The Feminine Mystique" is the one who identified the nameless dissatisfaction of women at home with the kids and the kitchen chores. But it was Archie Bunker's wife, Edith - so memorably portrayed by Jean Stapleton, who died last week at 90 - who brought it home, literally. "All in The Family" was the most popular show on network television for years in the 1970s - back in the days of appointment television, when families gathered together to watch their favorite shows.
SPORTS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1994
Former pitcher Wally Bunker has known three secrets of success in baseball and beyond: location, location, location.Lately, for example, he has been living in Coeur D'Alene, Idaho, a relentlessly scenic city of about 25,000 people surrounded by lakes, mountains and national forest in the state's northern panhandle. This suits Bunker, who was born in and grew up in two other cities known for good photo opportunities: Seattle and San Francisco, respectively.Since he left baseball in 1971, Bunker and his wife, Kathy, have made much of location, investing in real estate in out-of-the-way or depressed places and waiting as the tide turned.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | July 22, 2009
Forty-five years ago, he was baseball's boy wonder, a pitching phenom who, as a teenager, nearly fetched the 1964 Orioles a pennant. Then Wally Bunker was gone. Overnight, or so it seemed, he vanished, done in by a bum right arm that finished his career almost as quickly as it had begun. The Orioles' stopper at 19, he quit the game at 26. Bitter? Not Bunker. "No complaints," he said from his home in Ridgeland, S.C. "Playing baseball was magnificent, a dream come true. I was definitely really good, with a great sinker, but ... what can you do?
FEATURES
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1999
Maybe the polar ice caps have melted, plunging the greenswards and putting greens of the Worthington Valley under water.Perhaps nuclear fallout has poisoned the once-pastoral countryside where horses grazed and foxes darted for their lives.Or a global oil shortage has caused economic chaos, prompting murderous marauders to scour the county for food and shelter.Fire or ice, whimper or bang, if things fall apart, Zoh and Bob Hieronimus are ready. They've been ready for awhile, and by now, the untold chores of subterranean survival -- rotating canned goods, stuffing and burying food "torpedoes," stockpiling cotton swabs -- are no longer novel, but tiresome necessities.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2000
WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W. Va. -- The bus lets us off on a wooded hillside, and our tour guide gestures at an innocuous-looking green door at the entrance to what appears to be some sort of garage. "We're going in there," John Newsick says. Our little group of 20 or so stares at the door uncertainly. This is because a sign on the door says "Danger -- High Voltage," and there is something in the human animal that automatically shies away from incineration. "That sign was used only as a deterrent," Newsick announces with a smile.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1997
CHESTERTOWN -- Shelley Savage made a 50-foot bunker shot on the 18th hole to clinch the annual women's amateur championship of the Middle Atlantic Golf Association at wind-swept Chester River Yacht & Country Club yesterday.The birdie enabled Savage, the 1991 champion from Army Navy CC in Arlington, Va., to shoot a closing 76 for a 36-hole total of 151. This marked her first title in several years, although she has been a runner-up in the Virginia women's stroke-play championship three of the last five years.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 7, 1996
WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va. -- Larry Ickes ends his tour of the once-secret congressional bomb shelter built under the posh Greenbrier resort with a discussion of wallpaper.Standing at the entrance of a hallway, Mr. Ickes gestures at the wall covering, a trellis-like pattern in kelly green and white. He eyes the wall. Suspiciously. He turns to the hotel guests. Knowingly."I think this was intentional," says Mr. Ickes, an accountant by trade, "to create a busy effect. They don't want you to focus on this "With a sweep of his arm, he points to six hinges on the wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Simon Habtemariam | October 20, 2011
So apparently back in 1999, Sweet Dee Reynolds convinced the Gang to build a bunker to store supplies in preparation for Y2K. After the mass hysteria passed, and computers did NOT take over the world, the bunker was utilized for alternative purposes. Dennis has been bringing women down to the bunker for recreational activities, while Charlie has been surviving on their dried food products. When the “Storm of the Century” hits the East Coast, Mac, Charlie and Dennis head to the makeshift Walmart, to supply the bunker while Dee boards up the windows and Frank eats a boiled egg in his pocket.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune newspapers | October 7, 2010
By now, Hunter Mahan surely has realized the sun comes up again. Day after day after day. And with each day that passes, the sting of being the man from whom Europe figuratively wrested the Ryder Cup in all likelihood eases a bit. It hit pretty hard in the immediate aftermath at Celtic Manor, where Mahan struggled more than once to get words out as he discussed the pressure that went with having the Cup tilt on the final match's result....
SPORTS
August 19, 2010
Maybe they should just hold meetings. Get everybody in one room, pass out the sheet of local rules and go over it point by point. Allow time for questions. Offer two briefing times if that makes it easier on players. Heck, offer three. If a player can't be bothered to attend, send his caddie. Hey, NASCAR does it. Two hours before each Sprint Cup race, every driver and crew chief is required to attend the drivers' meeting. Among the items reviewed are speed limits on pit road, top speed under caution periods and where pit road technically begins and ends.
NEWS
By Teddy Greenstein, Tribune newspapers | August 16, 2010
SHEBOYGAN, Wis. — The 1968 Masters will be forever remembered for a clerical error by Roberto De Vicenzo, who signed for a wrong score and disqualified himself from a playoff with Bob Goalby. "What a stupid I am," De Vicenzo said. The indelible image of the 2010 PGA Championship? It came when Dustin Johnson, seated in the scorer's office, used the back end of a pencil to erase his "5" on No. 18. Sorry, Martin Kaymer. The 25-year-old German won his first major but will be a footnote to history, similar to when Jean Van de Velde handed the 1999 British Open to Paul Lawrie.
NEWS
By Teddy Greenstein, Tribune reporter | August 16, 2010
SHEBOYGAN, Wis. — Some will rip Jeff Overton for playing speed golf Sunday. They'll say he phoned it in — perhaps concerned about roaming charges — and didn't care enough to shoot better than a 7-over 79, his worst score of the week by five shots. But in this age of laborious pre-shot routines and five-hour-plus rounds, we applaud a man for completing 18 holes of a major in 2 hours, 9 minutes, an unofficial PGA Championship record. When the Associated Press' Doug Ferguson gave Overton the news, the 27-year-old Indiana native replied: "Awesome!
NEWS
By Chris Hine, Tribune newspapers | August 16, 2010
SHEBOYGAN, Wis. — The first item on the rules sheet the PGA of America handed out last week warned players to watch out — they could be hitting out of one of the 900-plus bunkers at Whistling Straits and not even know it. "That might mean many areas outside the ropes that might contain many footprints, heel prints or even tire tracks from golf cars or other vehicles," said Mark Wilson, co-chairman of the rules committee, which even...
TRAVEL
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff | November 18, 2001
The Greenbrier bills itself as "America's Resort," and if that conveys a certain arrogance and where-do-they-get-off hauteur, it's almost understandable. For one thing, the venerable West Virginia resort dates to the late 18th century, when wealthy visitors came to this isolated part of the Allegheny Mountains seeking the healing powers of its mineral springs. For another, while that first humble inn near White Sulphur Springs is now a first-class resort spread over 6,500 lush acres complete with a soaring Georgian-style main building and 670 guest rooms, it still attracts the rich, famous and powerful, who come these days for the golf, trout fishing, whitewater rafting and excellent cuisine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 20, 2007
Robert C. McGowan, a retired CSX official who had guided the affiliation of the Baltimore & Ohio and the Chesapeake & Ohio railroads in the 1960s, and also was in charge of the top-secret congressional bunker underneath a West Virginia resort hotel, died of Parkinson's disease Monday at the Brightwood Center in Lutherville. He was 83. Mr. McGowan was born and raised in Bloomfield, N.J. His college studies at Bucknell University were interrupted during World War II, when he enlisted in the Navy and served as an ensign aboard a destroyer in the South Pacific.
SPORTS
By Teddy Greenstein, Tribune reporter | August 15, 2010
SHEBOYGAN, Wis. — Several pros mocked Whistling Straits' 18th hole after the 2004 PGA Championship, saying it seemed contrived and had too small a green. Fuzzy Zoeller called the 500-yard par-4 "a joke" and added, "There's nothing good about it. " Now it's all good. Architect Pete Dye expanded the fairway, allowing players to try to bomb it over the giant bunker complex on the left. Steve Stricker used the new strip of fairway as a lay-up area in the first round — and got up-and-down for par after a gorgeous wedge shot from 142 yards.
SPORTS
By Teddy Greenstein, Tribune reporter | August 13, 2010
SHEBOYGAN, Wis. — Sergio Garcia went ballistic Thursday after blasting out of a greenside bunker during a bogey-bogey-bogey stretch. He slammed his wedge into the bunker five times, then threw the club at his bag, leaving his caddie to clean up his mess. The former No. 2 player in the world has slumped since suffering a broken heart at the hands of Morgan-Leigh Norman — the daughter of Greg — in the spring of 2009. "It hurt," he said. Garcia announced last weekend he will take a two-month break after the PGA Championship, bypassing the FedEx Cup events and the Ryder Cup. "I need to miss the game a little bit," he explained.
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