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By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
Many people imagine having a little bungalow by the beach. In 2005, Kurt and Gail Zanelotti were lucky enough to make that dream a reality. In what may possibly be one of the smallest houses in Fenwick Island, Del., the couple's thinking on their home is summed up in the words of a little plaque hanging on a wall of their enclosed front porch: "It is What It Is. " Kurt Zanelotti, 53, the owner of a commercial and residential floor-covering business,...
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
The existence of eastern Baltimore County's waterfront neighborhoods, dotted with an ever-growing number of summer cottages and year-round homes, came as a surprise to Frank and Nancy Lanzi. Neither of them even knew about the narrow Wilson Point peninsula jutting out into the Middle River. Now, almost 10 years after that introduction, the couple enjoys life on the river in their new custom-built bungalow, unable to imagine life anywhere else. "We call our house an unexpected blessing because we actually were not looking for a dream house," said Nancy Lanzi, a 56-year-old mother of three grown children and a middle school math teacher.
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NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
Ruxton residents have agreed not to push for the inclusion of an early 1900s bungalow on the county's historical landmarks list in exchange for assurances from a developer that he will restore the house. Over the past year, the bungalow on Berwick Road became a flash point for community anxiety about development in established communities and for developers' complaints about the county's landmarks preservation procedure. But this week, just before the County Council was to vote it onto the landmarks list, Council Chairman Kevin Kamenetz, a Democrat who represents the area, announced that the two sides had worked out their differences.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Ellicott City residents Rosario and Maria Di Marco never lost their desire to have a second home by the sea in Lewes, Del. To this day, the quiet resort town holds happy memories of summer vacations at Fort Miles near Cape Henlopen Park when their children were growing up. "Three years ago, while Googling for properties in the Lewes area, Rosario came across an abandoned home," Maria Di Marco recalled. "The house was in deplorable condition. The roof had caved in, snakes were hanging from the ceiling, and other creatures had decided to make it their home.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1996
Sometimes, even the mayor needs to get out of Baltimore.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who likes to promote the benefits of living in the big city, and his wife, Patricia, have chosen another place for weekend retreats -- a quiet home on the waterfront near Annapolis.The Schmokes have purchased a $300,000 bungalow on a shady, waterfront lot in the Arundel on the Bay community, a few miles outside Maryland's capital.Mrs. Schmoke, an ophthalmologist who spent her childhood summers with her grandparents in nearby Oyster Harbor, noticed the vacant home on a visit some time ago and fell in love with it, the mayor said.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
The existence of eastern Baltimore County's waterfront neighborhoods, dotted with an ever-growing number of summer cottages and year-round homes, came as a surprise to Frank and Nancy Lanzi. Neither of them even knew about the narrow Wilson Point peninsula jutting out into the Middle River. Now, almost 10 years after that introduction, the couple enjoys life on the river in their new custom-built bungalow, unable to imagine life anywhere else. "We call our house an unexpected blessing because we actually were not looking for a dream house," said Nancy Lanzi, a 56-year-old mother of three grown children and a middle school math teacher.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2003
A little bungalow in Ruxton is creating some big problems. Residents, seeking to preserve the character of their old, upper-crust neighborhood, are using the county's landmarks preservation process to try to stop a developer from knocking down the bungalow and building four houses in its place - an increasingly common practice as lots become scarce and established communities more desirable. But the developer, Melvin Benhoff, argues that the house is not historic and that the case illustrates the haphazard way Baltimore County has conducted its preservation business for years.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Hanging on the wall of Mike and Jean Tumbarello's new retreat at Deep Creek Lake is an old framed greeting card with a primitive drawing of a brown log cabin nestled among trees aglow with autumn colors. The scene is rendered in crayon with a sentiment that reads, in part: "Jean, here's our cottage in the country. I wish I were in it with you right now. …" "The card was sent before we married — probably 1974, when we were dating in college, when you actually had to use snail mail," Jean Tumbarello recalled.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007
BUNGALOWS GWYNN OAK 2006 Windsor Place-- $189,900 The property -- three bedrooms, one bath, 832 square feet Taxes -- $1,966 Features -- Located in the Windsor Terrace neighborhood in Baltimore County, this 1935 bungalow has an above-ground swimming pool and a new privacy fence. The kitchen, windows and bath also have been updated. BALTIMORE CITY 3109 Louise Ave. -- $229,900 The property -- three bedrooms, two baths, 1,240 square feet Taxes -- $2,991 Features -- This updated bungalow, originally built in 1926, has new paint and Berber carpet, refinished hardwood floors, finished basement, hot tub, a patio with a fenced backyard and a one-car garage.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1996
Sometimes, even the mayor needs to get out of Baltimore.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who likes to promote the benefits of living in the big city, and his wife, Patricia, have chosen another place for weekend retreats -- a quiet home on the waterfront near Annapolis.The Schmokes have purchased a $300,000 bungalow on a shady, waterfront lot in the Arundel on the Bay community, a few miles outside Maryland's capital.Mrs. Schmoke, an ophthalmologist who spent her childhood summers with her grandparents in nearby Oyster Harbor, noticed the vacant home on a visit sometime ago and fell in love with it, the mayor said.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Hanging on the wall of Mike and Jean Tumbarello's new retreat at Deep Creek Lake is an old framed greeting card with a primitive drawing of a brown log cabin nestled among trees aglow with autumn colors. The scene is rendered in crayon with a sentiment that reads, in part: "Jean, here's our cottage in the country. I wish I were in it with you right now. …" "The card was sent before we married — probably 1974, when we were dating in college, when you actually had to use snail mail," Jean Tumbarello recalled.
TRAVEL
By Brooks Welsh, Special to The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 11, 2012
If you're a college student or recent graduate lucky enough to have a full-time job or paid internship, it doesn't mean you have to give up summer on the shore. All you need is a small group of friends and a solid beach bungalow where you and your fellow weekend warriors can let loose. Here are the top five things you should be considering when grabbing a weekend seasonal rental: Expectations: First you must define what exactly are you looking to get out of your summer. Are you looking for a spot simply to party in or are you looking more so for a place to relax and unwind?
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
Many people imagine having a little bungalow by the beach. In 2005, Kurt and Gail Zanelotti were lucky enough to make that dream a reality. In what may possibly be one of the smallest houses in Fenwick Island, Del., the couple's thinking on their home is summed up in the words of a little plaque hanging on a wall of their enclosed front porch: "It is What It Is. " Kurt Zanelotti, 53, the owner of a commercial and residential floor-covering business,...
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2011
The best way to view Peck and Patti Miller's home on Assawoman Bay is from the stern of their 22-foot runabout — to slice the water across the little cove and to see the gables of their cottage in Ocean City come closer and closer as people wave from the pier. "Now this is how to experience it," said Peck Miller, a 55-year-old transplant from Towson who came to work "downy ocean" in 1973 when he was a teen and happened to stay. " Ocean City can be a noisy place. This area is called 'Little Salisbury' [because]
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2009
Peggy Poisal's friends are less taken aback at the interior of her home than the casual visitor, whose first reaction tends to be a gasp of wonder, followed by an overwhelming desire to take everything in at one fast turn of the head. A fire roars in a fireplace decorated with garland, fruit and stockings. The mantel is dressed with more flourishes of garland along with two small lighted topiaries at either end. A covered radiator in front of the living room window is a showplace of wooden folk art Santas and angels.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
When Ron Serio dug beneath the 800-square-foot bungalow he bought in 1978 to create a basement, he separated so many stones from the dirt that he used only some of the rocks for the exterior of the one-story home's foundation. He salvaged chestnut boards from old outbuildings on the property for paneling. That alone took 15 years. "I had a lot of time leaning on that shovel to think about what I wanted to do with the place," Serio said. What he wanted was to capitalize on the storybook setting.
NEWS
By Brendan Kearney and Brendan Kearney,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2002
The Baltimore County Council has added eight area properties to the county's list of historic landmarks, a move designed to preserve the architectural character of the buildings. The properties are the McCubbin-Quinn Bungalow in Glyndon, Christian's Chance near Butler, Roslyn and the Hamburger-Hefter Bungalow in Pikesville, Samuel's Hope in Ruxton, the Ridge School and Riderwood railroad station in Riderwood, and the Brooklandville railroad station. They were named landmarks last month.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | June 29, 2008
We recently purchased an 80-year-old house that needs a lot of interior renovation. Can you give us some guidelines on how to proceed? The real estate agent described the house as an example of the Prairie Style. We're not sure what that means, but there's plenty of dark oak on the walls and floors, which we may not want to retain. To identify one's needs and wishes - both aesthetic and functional - it's essential to be aware of a home's architectural style. Such an understanding will help in deciding what design direction to follow ... or to depart from.
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